Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJames Meredith
IN THE NEWS

James Meredith

FEATURED ARTICLES
NATIONAL
February 21, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
University of Mississippi police are pushing for criminal charges to be filed against three 19-year-old male freshmen suspected of placing a noose and a flag with a Confederate battle emblem on the campus statue of civil rights icon James Meredith. The students declined through their attorneys to be questioned by university police about the Sunday morning incident, which the school has described as vandalism on the bronze statue of Ole Miss' first African American student. Campus Police Chief Calvin Sellers said in a statement Friday that he and the university's lawyer believed that “sufficient evidence exists to bring criminal charges against the suspects,” and pledged to help state and federal authorities in the investigation.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
February 21, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
University of Mississippi police are pushing for criminal charges to be filed against three 19-year-old male freshmen suspected of placing a noose and a flag with a Confederate battle emblem on the campus statue of civil rights icon James Meredith. The students declined through their attorneys to be questioned by university police about the Sunday morning incident, which the school has described as vandalism on the bronze statue of Ole Miss' first African American student. Campus Police Chief Calvin Sellers said in a statement Friday that he and the university's lawyer believed that “sufficient evidence exists to bring criminal charges against the suspects,” and pledged to help state and federal authorities in the investigation.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
February 18, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
James Meredith, a civil rights icon whose enrollment at the University of Mississippi broke a racial barrier in 1962, has one thing to say to the vandals who desecrated his campus statue by putting a noose around its neck and draping it with a controversial flag. "That just clearly shows that we're not training our children like the Bible says," Meredith, 80, told the Los Angeles Times from his Mississippi home Tuesday. "They don't know right and wrong, good and bad and how to apply it to life.
NATIONAL
February 18, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
James Meredith, a civil rights icon whose enrollment at the University of Mississippi broke a racial barrier in 1962, has one thing to say to the vandals who desecrated his campus statue by putting a noose around its neck and draping it with a controversial flag. "That just clearly shows that we're not training our children like the Bible says," Meredith, 80, told the Los Angeles Times from his Mississippi home Tuesday. "They don't know right and wrong, good and bad and how to apply it to life.
NEWS
May 9, 1991 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To many, the name James Meredith is, in itself, a symbol. This man sitting in a small house on a quiet street in San Diego was the first African-American student enrolled in the University of Mississippi. The year: 1962. For that reason alone, Meredith, 57, is a civil rights pioneer. Like Rosa Parks and Jackie Robinson before him, he is recognized for having been first, in some critical way, in the struggle for racial equality.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1991 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To many in the United States, the name James Meredith is, in itself, a symbol. This man sitting in a small house on a quiet street in San Diego was the first black student ever enrolled in the University of Mississippi. The year: 1962. For that reason alone, Meredith, 57, is a civil rights pioneer. Like Rosa Parks and Jackie Robinson before him, he is recognized for having been first, in some critical way, in the struggle for racial equality. "James Meredith is a pioneer in American history and certainly in the civil rights movement," said Niger Innis, director of the Washington chapter of the Congress of Racial Equality, or CORE.
NEWS
March 9, 1996
James Fredrick Deckard, 58, Emmy-winning cinematographer of documentaries for television. He won an Emmy and the Cine Golden Eagle Award for the 1980 National Geographic special "Polar Bear Alert," which he created, produced and photographed. In 1991, Deckard produced and directed the award-winning environmental documentary "Hell on Earth: The Kuwaiti Oil Fires" for the Arts & Entertainment cable network.
NEWS
September 26, 1989 | United Press International
Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.) said in an interview today he has hired James Meredith, the first black to attend the University of Mississippi, but not just because Meredith is black. Meredith, now 56, was escorted by 30,000 federal troops and U.S. marshals when he entered the segregated Mississippi campus in 1963. Ensuing riots left two dead. Helms hired Meredith as a special assistant, the conservative senator told the Winston-Salem Journal. "I did not hire Dr. Meredith because he was black.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2012 | Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Karl Fleming, a former Newsweek reporter who helped draw national attention to the civil rights movement in the 1960s - and risked his life covering it with perceptive stories about its major figures and the inequalities that fueled it - died Saturday at his home in Los Angeles. He was 84. The cause was related to a number of respiratory ailments, said his son Charles Fleming. Born and bred in the Jim Crow South, Fleming worked his way through small North Carolina newspapers to become chief of Newsweek's Atlanta bureau in 1961.
NEWS
March 9, 1996
James Fredrick Deckard, 58, Emmy-winning cinematographer of documentaries for television. He won an Emmy and the Cine Golden Eagle Award for the 1980 National Geographic special "Polar Bear Alert," which he created, produced and photographed. In 1991, Deckard produced and directed the award-winning environmental documentary "Hell on Earth: The Kuwaiti Oil Fires" for the Arts & Entertainment cable network.
NEWS
December 2, 1991 | By Times staff writers
AD WARS: The first commercial for a 1992 presidential candidate has been broadcast in New Hampshire, but the nature of the impending media battle in that key state remains something of a mystery. Former Massachusetts Sen. Paul E. Tsongas fired the opening salvo with an advertisement that, in part, addresses one of his apparent liabilities--questions about his health.
NEWS
May 9, 1991 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To many, the name James Meredith is, in itself, a symbol. This man sitting in a small house on a quiet street in San Diego was the first African-American student enrolled in the University of Mississippi. The year: 1962. For that reason alone, Meredith, 57, is a civil rights pioneer. Like Rosa Parks and Jackie Robinson before him, he is recognized for having been first, in some critical way, in the struggle for racial equality.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1991 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To many in the United States, the name James Meredith is, in itself, a symbol. This man sitting in a small house on a quiet street in San Diego was the first black student ever enrolled in the University of Mississippi. The year: 1962. For that reason alone, Meredith, 57, is a civil rights pioneer. Like Rosa Parks and Jackie Robinson before him, he is recognized for having been first, in some critical way, in the struggle for racial equality. "James Meredith is a pioneer in American history and certainly in the civil rights movement," said Niger Innis, director of the Washington chapter of the Congress of Racial Equality, or CORE.
NEWS
December 2, 1991 | By Times staff writers
AD WARS: The first commercial for a 1992 presidential candidate has been broadcast in New Hampshire, but the nature of the impending media battle in that key state remains something of a mystery. Former Massachusetts Sen. Paul E. Tsongas fired the opening salvo with an advertisement that, in part, addresses one of his apparent liabilities--questions about his health.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2012 | Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Karl Fleming, a former Newsweek reporter who helped draw national attention to the civil rights movement in the 1960s - and risked his life covering it with perceptive stories about its major figures and the inequalities that fueled it - died Saturday at his home in Los Angeles. He was 84. The cause was related to a number of respiratory ailments, said his son Charles Fleming. Born and bred in the Jim Crow South, Fleming worked his way through small North Carolina newspapers to become chief of Newsweek's Atlanta bureau in 1961.
NEWS
September 26, 1989 | United Press International
Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.) said in an interview today he has hired James Meredith, the first black to attend the University of Mississippi, but not just because Meredith is black. Meredith, now 56, was escorted by 30,000 federal troops and U.S. marshals when he entered the segregated Mississippi campus in 1963. Ensuing riots left two dead. Helms hired Meredith as a special assistant, the conservative senator told the Winston-Salem Journal. "I did not hire Dr. Meredith because he was black.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|