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James Michener

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April 7, 1991 | Andrew Ferguson, Ferguson is an editorial writer with Scripps Howard News Service in Washington, D.C.
Any reader familiar with James Michener's books will approach his new novel, called "The Novel," with some uneasiness. "Hawaii," "Iberia," "Poland," "Texas" and the many other doorstop books on which Michener has built his fortune are distinguished most by their startling comprehensiveness.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2007 | Christopher Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
JAMES A. MICHENER, dead 10 years, has a new novel out, a two-generation love story called "Matecumbe." It's not much good. But the story of its publication is, like a car crash, hard to ignore. The short version is this: The author was in his 60s and at the peak of his fame when a writer-researcher he was working with introduced him to a young woman named Melissa, who lived in the Florida Keys.
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NEWS
December 18, 1991 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You expect a certain image from one of America's favorite storytellers; expect that a man whose books have sold so many millions of copies would march in and act like a star. You imagine that the author of "Tales of the South Pacific," "Hawaii," "Alaska," and "Texas" would overwhelm with a carefully constructed personality. But James Michener is all business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1997
Re "Blockbuster Author Michener Dies," Oct. 17: When I hear the name James A. Michener, my head is flooded with stories, history, embellishments and an imagination that didn't slow down for 90 years. He stated that he was not an author, and did not have a brilliant mind. Well Mr. Michener, this individual says you are wrong in that assessment, because you were exactly that and so much more that it cannot be put into words. When I think of the name Michener, what comes to mind is a Frenchman paddling down the Snake River in Colorado, by the name of Pasquinel, on his way to get beaver pelts.
NEWS
November 7, 1994 | JACK SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Recessional" is about life among the elderly residents, living and dying, at the Palms, a Florida retirement home. Andy Zorn, a young obstetrician who has lost his license in a scurrilous lawsuit, is hired to manage it, with an eye to increasing profits. He elects to drive from Chicago to Tampa in icy weather and near Chattanooga he is involved in a horrible multivehicle accident in which a young woman's legs are amputated below the knees.
NEWS
January 25, 1993 | CAROLYN SEE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The premise of this short book is this: In 1959, after he had finished his blockbuster novel, "Hawaii," James Michener, as he writes here in his first paragraph, "cast about to decide what subject I should tackle next." It would either be Scotland, which he decided against, or Mexico, which he went for.
NEWS
May 8, 1994
Concerning your Reruns to Rewatch (TV Times, April 17): James Michener and James Clavell do have the same first names, and they both write historical fiction, but "Shogun" was written by Clavell, not Michener. A small error, but for James Michener and James Clavell fans, an important fact. Bob Zhe, Westminster
NEWS
June 30, 1985
Dr. Robert Goodwin questioned the quality of the space information in the CBS miniseries "Space" (Talkback, May 26). I can't vouch for James Michener's research, but I know the producers went out of their way to get the most accurate story possible. My father, who was a member of the film crew, made a lot of people very happy when they found out that he had worked in the early space program. They were so happy, in fact, that they made him a consultant for the duration of the filming.
MAGAZINE
October 19, 1986 | JERRY HULSE
Pulitzer prize-winning author James A. Michener's first book of fiction, "Tales of the South Pacific,"enraptured millions. In this issue of Traveling In Style, Michener takes our readers back to the same islands on another visit, 40 years later. In "Return to the South Pacific," the noted author meets again a number of characters from his book, including the legendary Aggie Grey, who fed and sheltered American Marines in Western Samoa during World War II.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
James Michener says he plans to keep writing five hours a day while he spends his winters teaching and taking part in a college program for 216 retired professionals and their spouses. The author said Wednesday that he and his wife, Mari, have settled on the Academy of Senior Professionals at Eckerd College in which to pass their time from October to February. They had looked at about 40 possibilities. "It's what people my age look for," said Michener, 83.
MAGAZINE
October 12, 1997 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, Christopher Reynolds is The Times' travel writer. His last magazine story was on Wales
Wow. It's not yet 9 on a sparkling Friday morning, and two new tourists have just landed at Bora-Bora. They are tired, and perhaps they are hallucinating. Having flown eight hours through the night to Tahiti, then 45 minutes from Tahiti to this pebble of an outlying island, the American tourists step from a small plane to the runway, and from the runway to the tiny terminal.
NEWS
November 7, 1994 | JACK SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Recessional" is about life among the elderly residents, living and dying, at the Palms, a Florida retirement home. Andy Zorn, a young obstetrician who has lost his license in a scurrilous lawsuit, is hired to manage it, with an eye to increasing profits. He elects to drive from Chicago to Tampa in icy weather and near Chattanooga he is involved in a horrible multivehicle accident in which a young woman's legs are amputated below the knees.
NEWS
May 8, 1994
Concerning your Reruns to Rewatch (TV Times, April 17): James Michener and James Clavell do have the same first names, and they both write historical fiction, but "Shogun" was written by Clavell, not Michener. A small error, but for James Michener and James Clavell fans, an important fact. Bob Zhe, Westminster
NEWS
January 28, 1994 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; T.H. McCulloh writes regularly about theater for The Times
Is it a trend, turning successful films into stage musicals? Not necessarily. "Sunset Boulevard" at the Shubert Theatre is the film, with music added. The musical version of James Michener's "Sayonara," which opened last night at the newly refurbished Alex Theatre, ignores the popular Marlon Brando film and finds its source in Michener's original novel, without Hollywood's, and Brando's, adjustments. It's also not a Johnny-come-lately.
NEWS
January 25, 1993 | CAROLYN SEE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The premise of this short book is this: In 1959, after he had finished his blockbuster novel, "Hawaii," James Michener, as he writes here in his first paragraph, "cast about to decide what subject I should tackle next." It would either be Scotland, which he decided against, or Mexico, which he went for.
BOOKS
January 12, 1992 | Bill Barich, Barich, the author of "Laughing in the Hills" and other books, is completing a new book about California
In his new memoir, "The World Is My Home," James Michener puts to rest the idea that there are no second acts in American lives. As the old saying goes, his life really began at 40, when, during World War II, he sat down in a Quonset hut on Espiritu Santo Island, lit a smoky lantern, and turned out the linked stories that became "Tales of the South Pacific," which won him a Pulitzer Prize in 1947.
NEWS
April 18, 1990
Author James Michener said good weather and a stimulating educational atmosphere are among the reasons he and his wife have decided to make St. Petersburg their winter retirement home. "I think that the climate of Florida is very attractive to older people. Believe me, it gets more so every year," the 83-year-old author said Tuesday. Michener, who bought a summer residence in Brunswick, Me.
NEWS
December 18, 1991 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You expect a certain image from one of America's favorite storytellers; expect that a man whose books have sold so many millions of copies would march in and act like a star. You imagine that the author of "Tales of the South Pacific," "Hawaii," "Alaska," and "Texas" would overwhelm with a carefully constructed personality. But James Michener is all business.
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