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James Mills

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October 7, 1990 | Robert Cullen, Cullen, a former Moscow correspondent, is the author of the recent novel "Soviet Sources" (Atlantic Monthly Press). and
Like certain defense contractors, writers of Cold War fiction nowadays confront a troublesome new world. For 30-odd years, they plied their trade in a propitious atmosphere. Americans lived in the knowledge that the Soviet Union could--and, conceivably, might--blow us apart. Most of us, to get on with our lives, repressed the fear and anxiety this knowledge caused.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1992 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the eve of opening arguments in a multimillion-dollar libel case that pitted one of Los Angeles' best-known lawyers against one of the nation's most prominent publishing houses, both sides announced Wednesday that they had reached a settlement. The settlement comes after more than five years of litigation in a lawsuit filed by criminal defense lawyer Barry Tarlow against the author and publishers of "The Underground Empire: Where Crimes and Governments Embrace."
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BOOKS
November 2, 1986
If David Johnston had not done his investigation of "The Underground Empire," my faith in The Times' Book Review would have been badly shaken. I purchased the book, which was advertised in another publication, a month or two before and on the reputation of the publisher, I took it home without my usual skimming. That I was snookered does not sit well, as you can imagine. I realized I had bought a book without an index. This, to my untrained eye, seemed strange. The question that kept popping into my mind as I read was: Who in the DEA or the FBI would take James Mills into his confidence in an ongoing investigation of such a sensitive subject?
BOOKS
October 7, 1990 | Robert Cullen, Cullen, a former Moscow correspondent, is the author of the recent novel "Soviet Sources" (Atlantic Monthly Press). and
Like certain defense contractors, writers of Cold War fiction nowadays confront a troublesome new world. For 30-odd years, they plied their trade in a propitious atmosphere. Americans lived in the knowledge that the Soviet Union could--and, conceivably, might--blow us apart. Most of us, to get on with our lives, repressed the fear and anxiety this knowledge caused.
NEWS
May 13, 1987
"The Underground Empire," a controversial best-seller which purports to tell the true story of a band of secretive federal drug agents who were breaking up the world's largest drug conspiracy until they were shut down by the FBI, became the target of a $30-million federal libel suit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1992 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the eve of opening arguments in a multimillion-dollar libel case that pitted one of Los Angeles' best-known lawyers against one of the nation's most prominent publishing houses, both sides announced Wednesday that they had reached a settlement. The settlement comes after more than five years of litigation in a lawsuit filed by criminal defense lawyer Barry Tarlow against the author and publishers of "The Underground Empire: Where Crimes and Governments Embrace."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1988 | LEONARD BERNSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
The Metropolitan Transit Development Board tentatively agreed Thursday to pay its chairman, former State Sen. James Mills, $90,000 over the next three years, a decision that apparently makes Mills the first leader of a quasi-public agency in San Diego to earn such compensation.
BOOKS
January 24, 1988 | Jess Bravin, Bravin formerly covered the California Legislature in Sacramento for The Times. and
After scorning his leadership for the last 15 years of his life, Sacramento virtually deified Jesse M. Unruh upon his death Aug. 4, with politicians of both parties tumbling over each other to praise the fallen state treasurer. Republican Gov. George Deukmejian named State Office Building No.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2011 | By Phil Willon, Los Angeles Times
The heartache and redemption that infused the life and soulful voice of Etta James, steeling her to survive the hardest of times, seem to keep playing on for the blues and R&B great. FOR THE RECORD: Etta James: A headline in the Jan. 15 LATExtra section about a court dispute involving the family of ailing singer Etta James stated incorrectly that she is 70 years old. James is 72 years old. As James lies seriously ill in her suburban Riverside home, her husband and sons are locked in a court dispute over control of the singer's $1 million in savings.
BOOKS
January 24, 1988 | Jess Bravin, Bravin formerly covered the California Legislature in Sacramento for The Times. and
After scorning his leadership for the last 15 years of his life, Sacramento virtually deified Jesse M. Unruh upon his death Aug. 4, with politicians of both parties tumbling over each other to praise the fallen state treasurer. Republican Gov. George Deukmejian named State Office Building No.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1988 | LEONARD BERNSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
The Metropolitan Transit Development Board tentatively agreed Thursday to pay its chairman, former State Sen. James Mills, $90,000 over the next three years, a decision that apparently makes Mills the first leader of a quasi-public agency in San Diego to earn such compensation.
NEWS
May 13, 1987
"The Underground Empire," a controversial best-seller which purports to tell the true story of a band of secretive federal drug agents who were breaking up the world's largest drug conspiracy until they were shut down by the FBI, became the target of a $30-million federal libel suit.
BOOKS
November 2, 1986
If David Johnston had not done his investigation of "The Underground Empire," my faith in The Times' Book Review would have been badly shaken. I purchased the book, which was advertised in another publication, a month or two before and on the reputation of the publisher, I took it home without my usual skimming. That I was snookered does not sit well, as you can imagine. I realized I had bought a book without an index. This, to my untrained eye, seemed strange. The question that kept popping into my mind as I read was: Who in the DEA or the FBI would take James Mills into his confidence in an ongoing investigation of such a sensitive subject?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1992
Barry Tarlow, a well-known criminal defense attorney who sued the author and publishers of a controversial 1986 drug war expose, said Tuesday that he had received the settlement check and already set up an appointment to go house shopping with the money. Tarlow maintained that "The Underground Empire," written by James Mills and published in 1985 by Doubleday and Co., libeled him by suggesting that he was involved in money laundering.
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