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James Moody

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Why isn't James Moody better known? Why doesn't this creatively charged, supremely entertaining jazz artist have a larger following of fans? Good questions, with no real answers. Listening and watching Moody's captivating performance at the Jazz Bakery on Tuesday night, it was hard to understand how this gifted musician could have reached the age of 73 without becoming a nationally recognized jazz icon.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2012
A monster of the Hammond B-3 organ who has performed with jazz heavyweights David Sanborn, James Moody and Elvin Jones, Joey DeFrancesco conjures the ghosts of former greats Jimmy Smith and Larry Young with a tone that burns through touches of blues and funk with equal parts fire and grace. Upstairs at Vitello's, 4349 Tujunga Ave., Studio City. 8 and 10 p.m. Thu.-Fri. $25. http://www.vitellosjazz.com .
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1994 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
How's this for a quick way to start a jazz set: Kick off a high- speed version of "Anthropology," then dig into the fast lane for, oh, say 14 or 15 nonstop choruses. No, it's not the kind of risk that very many jazz players--young or old--care to take. But it didn't intimidate James Moody at all in his opening set at the Jazz Bakery on Wednesday night.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2010 | By Don Heckman, Special to The Times
James Moody, a jazz saxophonist and flutist whose improvised solo on a recording of the song "I'm in the Mood for Love" became a jazz classic, died Thursday in San Diego, where he had lived in recent years. He was 85 and had pancreatic cancer. His death was confirmed by a spokeswoman for the San Diego Hospice. The recording, made in Stockholm in 1949, became a rare jazz hit as an instrumental. When singer King Pleasure recorded Eddie Jefferson's lyrics for Moody's improvisation in 1954, it became a cross-genre hit, subsequently recorded by singers ranging from Van Morrison, George Benson and Aretha Franklin to Tito Puente and Amy Winehouse.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2002 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
The ageless bundle of musical inventiveness and outrageous humor named James Moody just keeps rolling along. On Saturday he brought his irrepressible presence to Clancy's Crab Shack in Glendale -- a warm and homey room that is quickly emerging as an important weekend jazz destination.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2012
A monster of the Hammond B-3 organ who has performed with jazz heavyweights David Sanborn, James Moody and Elvin Jones, Joey DeFrancesco conjures the ghosts of former greats Jimmy Smith and Larry Young with a tone that burns through touches of blues and funk with equal parts fire and grace. Upstairs at Vitello's, 4349 Tujunga Ave., Studio City. 8 and 10 p.m. Thu.-Fri. $25. http://www.vitellosjazz.com .
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER
** 1/2 James Moody, "Honey," Novus/RCA. At age 66, Moody remains a cheerfully creative innovator. He makes a surprise switch to soprano sax on several cuts, showing the same mastery he has long displayed on other horns. "It Might as Well Be Spring" is a duet on alto sax with the propulsive pianist Kenny Barron; "Look Into My Eyes" pairs Moody's tenor with Todd Coolman's bass. Albums are rated on a scale of one asterisk (poor) to five (a classic).
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1996 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As he opened his first set at Catalina Bar & Grill Wednesday, saxophonist James Moody gave a perfunctory nod to his new Frank Sinatra-inspired album by playing--and singing--its title tune "Young at Heart." That out of the way, he got down to more serious musical business. The recent recording of Sinatra covers, featuring strings and a horn section, emphasizes only one of Moody's great strengths: his beautiful yet unsentimental way with a ballad.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Here's a thought for the holiday weekend. Before you go anywhere, stop by Catalina Bar & Grill to hear James Moody in action. An hour or so of exposure to the veteran saxophonist-flutist's engaging performance will put you in the sort of high spirits that will make the vacation all the better. Moody is one of the last of a generation of jazz players who saw no dividing line between art and entertainment, who could follow outrageous humor with adventurous improvising.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1989 | LEONARD FEATHER
James Moody, a San Diegan these days, came to town Tuesday for a stint at Catalina's. Any visit by the veteran saxophonist, who won his be-bop spurs with Dizzy Gillespie, is an occasion for rejoicing, and on his opening night he was in particularly good spirits, playing "Happy Birthday to You" for his daughter and dedicating the set to his wife. Moody is one of a handful of artists who can claim equal proficiency on three instruments.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2005 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
James Moody's 80th Birthday Celebration on Saturday at Walt Disney Concert Hall gave welcome recognition to the contributions of a great jazz artist. Moody may be best known for the improvised tenor saxophone solo that eventually (with Eddie Jefferson's lyrics) became "Moody's Mood for Love." But his lengthy career has been filled with equally imaginative -- if less visible -- musical accomplishments. Moody's performance at the tribute underscored that, for him, 80 is just a number.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2002 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
The ageless bundle of musical inventiveness and outrageous humor named James Moody just keeps rolling along. On Saturday he brought his irrepressible presence to Clancy's Crab Shack in Glendale -- a warm and homey room that is quickly emerging as an important weekend jazz destination.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Here's a thought for the holiday weekend. Before you go anywhere, stop by Catalina Bar & Grill to hear James Moody in action. An hour or so of exposure to the veteran saxophonist-flutist's engaging performance will put you in the sort of high spirits that will make the vacation all the better. Moody is one of the last of a generation of jazz players who saw no dividing line between art and entertainment, who could follow outrageous humor with adventurous improvising.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Why isn't James Moody better known? Why doesn't this creatively charged, supremely entertaining jazz artist have a larger following of fans? Good questions, with no real answers. Listening and watching Moody's captivating performance at the Jazz Bakery on Tuesday night, it was hard to understand how this gifted musician could have reached the age of 73 without becoming a nationally recognized jazz icon.
NEWS
January 24, 1998 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Monica S. Lewinsky claims that President Clinton frequently telephoned her at home late at night, engaged in telephone sex with her and eventually devastated her emotionally by becoming involved with several other women, a person close to the matter said Friday after hearing portions of Lewinsky's secretly tape-recorded conversations.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1997 | Don Heckman
Frank Sinatra has always appealed to jazz musicians. The attraction traces, in part, to his long history of associating himself with the finest players, from his early days with Harry James and Tommy Dorsey to his final performance years, when his backup band was a virtual all-star ensemble. But there were other fascinations, as well. Sinatra's macho, lady-killer image also rang a bell with jazz players, many of whom have held on to their chauvinistic attitudes well into the present.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1991 | DIRK SUTRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Wednesday could have been a night of mere recuperation for saxophonist James Moody. After all, he had barely slept the night before, flying back home to San Diego from New York City after playing Carnegie Hall as part of a tribute to singer Sarah Vaughan. But Moody's ever-present charisma and sense of humor arrived intact for his first show at Elario's, where he appears nightly through Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1988 | Dirk Sutro
Only a few times a year do San Diegans get a chance to hear one of the living treasures of bebop, and even less frequently, to hear one play in an intimate room where the acoustics do justice to the jazz. Mark your calendars. Sax and flute player James Moody, an original bebopper with an open mind, begins a two-week run at Elario's in La Jolla on Wednesday night. Moody learned the ropes from one of the seminal bebop figures, starting his career with Dizzy Gillespie's Big Band in 1947.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1996 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As he opened his first set at Catalina Bar & Grill Wednesday, saxophonist James Moody gave a perfunctory nod to his new Frank Sinatra-inspired album by playing--and singing--its title tune "Young at Heart." That out of the way, he got down to more serious musical business. The recent recording of Sinatra covers, featuring strings and a horn section, emphasizes only one of Moody's great strengths: his beautiful yet unsentimental way with a ballad.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1994 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
How's this for a quick way to start a jazz set: Kick off a high- speed version of "Anthropology," then dig into the fast lane for, oh, say 14 or 15 nonstop choruses. No, it's not the kind of risk that very many jazz players--young or old--care to take. But it didn't intimidate James Moody at all in his opening set at the Jazz Bakery on Wednesday night.
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