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James Morrison

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
The movies have " 'Crocodile' Dundee"; jazz has James Morrison. The 25-year-old multi-instrumentalist from a small town in the Australian outback has long since conquered his native land; during several visits to the United States (he spent five months here last year), audiences at clubs in major cities have marveled at his mastery of the trombone, trumpet, euphonium, fluegelhorn, alto saxophone and piano.
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SPORTS
July 11, 2013 | By David Wharton
There's no use denying that Phil Mickelson needed a while to get over the hurt of finishing second at the U.S. Open last month. "But part of professional golf is dealing with losing and dealing with disappointment and being resilient and bouncing back and using it as a steppingstone," Mickelson said. The world's eighth-ranked golfer showed signs of snapping back into form on Thursday, shooting a 6-under 66 in the first round of the Scottish Open at Castle Stuart Golf Links in Inverness.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1996 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Where do you find a playwright? George S. Kaufman and Walter Kerr, not to mention George Bernard Shaw, were critics first. You might find a playwright lurking behind a novelist, such as Somerset Maugham. These days you might look into the ranks of actors. Sam Shepard made his name as a playwright, as did Christopher Durang and Wallace Shawn. On the local scene, an actor has a play opening this weekend at The Road Theatre at North Hollywood's Lankershim Arts Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2008
I have a few words for James Morrison, whose letter disparaged Terrence Howard, asserting that, "He doesn't get the play ['Cat on a Hot Tin Roof']" [Letters, March 9]. Obviously Mr. Morrison has not seen Terrence in the play. I had the pleasure of seeing the play last week and I assure you, he absolutely gets it. If anything, I took issue with Debbie Allen's direction, giving moments of the play the feel of a sitcom. But Terrence's interpretation of Brick is nuanced, modern and highly effective.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2005
One of the many reasons film critics come close to being universally reviled and will never be taken seriously is that they lack the imagination and insight to examine anything without divulging plot points that ruin films for those of us who have not yet seen the pictures. Congratulations to Carina Chocano for continuing the trend. James Morrison Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1997
A driver suspected of being drunk lost control of his car on Robinson Ranch Road on Friday and struck and killed a woman on the sidewalk, authorities said. James Morrison, 53, of Trabuco Canyon was driving east when his car struck the right curb and swerved to the westbound sidewalk, California Highway Patrol Officer Joan Rivas said. The 50-year-old pedestrian, whose name was not released, died at the scene. Morrison was booked on suspicion of drunk driving.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2008
I have a few words for James Morrison, whose letter disparaged Terrence Howard, asserting that, "He doesn't get the play ['Cat on a Hot Tin Roof']" [Letters, March 9]. Obviously Mr. Morrison has not seen Terrence in the play. I had the pleasure of seeing the play last week and I assure you, he absolutely gets it. If anything, I took issue with Debbie Allen's direction, giving moments of the play the feel of a sitcom. But Terrence's interpretation of Brick is nuanced, modern and highly effective.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2008
WITH peevish arrogance, Terrence Howard speaks ["Ready for a New Fight," March 2] of searching, like any good "warrior," for "the thing that's going to make me fail." He obviously expects to be congratulated for his "courage." But if he thinks that the point of Tennessee Williams' "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" -- this beautiful play about the agonies of the closet and the tortures of internalized homophobia -- is to expose the "hypocrisy and mendacity" of a society that won't let men put their arms around each other without being "accused" of being gay -- well, then I guess he is to be congratulated, because he's already failed.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER
James Morrison, a multi-instrumentalist from New South Wales, recently recorded an album for which he overdubbed four trumpets, four trombones and five saxes. Clearly, this is not a trick that can be repeated in person, nor did his local club debut Thursday at Central Park West offer much by way of compensation. Between his Australian accent and the conversational buzz (this has to be one of the noisiest rooms in town), it was hard to follow what Morrison was saying or playing.
SPORTS
July 11, 2013 | By David Wharton
There's no use denying that Phil Mickelson needed a while to get over the hurt of finishing second at the U.S. Open last month. "But part of professional golf is dealing with losing and dealing with disappointment and being resilient and bouncing back and using it as a steppingstone," Mickelson said. The world's eighth-ranked golfer showed signs of snapping back into form on Thursday, shooting a 6-under 66 in the first round of the Scottish Open at Castle Stuart Golf Links in Inverness.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2008
WITH peevish arrogance, Terrence Howard speaks ["Ready for a New Fight," March 2] of searching, like any good "warrior," for "the thing that's going to make me fail." He obviously expects to be congratulated for his "courage." But if he thinks that the point of Tennessee Williams' "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" -- this beautiful play about the agonies of the closet and the tortures of internalized homophobia -- is to expose the "hypocrisy and mendacity" of a society that won't let men put their arms around each other without being "accused" of being gay -- well, then I guess he is to be congratulated, because he's already failed.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2005
One of the many reasons film critics come close to being universally reviled and will never be taken seriously is that they lack the imagination and insight to examine anything without divulging plot points that ruin films for those of us who have not yet seen the pictures. Congratulations to Carina Chocano for continuing the trend. James Morrison Los Angeles
BOOKS
June 30, 2002 | ORVILLE SCHELL, Orville Schell is the author of, most recently, "Virtual Tibet: The Search for Shangri-La: From Hollywood to the Himalayas" and is dean of the Graduate School of Journalism at UC Berkeley.
Rarely has there been a remote land more freighted with meaning for the West than Tibet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1997
A driver suspected of being drunk lost control of his car on Robinson Ranch Road on Friday and struck and killed a woman on the sidewalk, authorities said. James Morrison, 53, of Trabuco Canyon was driving east when his car struck the right curb and swerved to the westbound sidewalk, California Highway Patrol Officer Joan Rivas said. The 50-year-old pedestrian, whose name was not released, died at the scene. Morrison was booked on suspicion of drunk driving.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1996 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Where do you find a playwright? George S. Kaufman and Walter Kerr, not to mention George Bernard Shaw, were critics first. You might find a playwright lurking behind a novelist, such as Somerset Maugham. These days you might look into the ranks of actors. Sam Shepard made his name as a playwright, as did Christopher Durang and Wallace Shawn. On the local scene, an actor has a play opening this weekend at The Road Theatre at North Hollywood's Lankershim Arts Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER
James Morrison, a multi-instrumentalist from New South Wales, recently recorded an album for which he overdubbed four trumpets, four trombones and five saxes. Clearly, this is not a trick that can be repeated in person, nor did his local club debut Thursday at Central Park West offer much by way of compensation. Between his Australian accent and the conversational buzz (this has to be one of the noisiest rooms in town), it was hard to follow what Morrison was saying or playing.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1988 | DON HECKMAN
Talk about versatility. Or maybe the word is multipurpose. Or all-faceted. Take your choice. Any or all of the above apply to the playing of a remarkable Australian jazz musician named James Morrison. Working a one-nighter at Catalina's Bar & Grill Thursday, Morrison shifted, with no strain at all, between fluegelhorn, trombone and trumpet. A baritone horn, also available for action, didn't quite make it into the first set of music.
BOOKS
June 30, 2002 | ORVILLE SCHELL, Orville Schell is the author of, most recently, "Virtual Tibet: The Search for Shangri-La: From Hollywood to the Himalayas" and is dean of the Graduate School of Journalism at UC Berkeley.
Rarely has there been a remote land more freighted with meaning for the West than Tibet.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
The movies have " 'Crocodile' Dundee"; jazz has James Morrison. The 25-year-old multi-instrumentalist from a small town in the Australian outback has long since conquered his native land; during several visits to the United States (he spent five months here last year), audiences at clubs in major cities have marveled at his mastery of the trombone, trumpet, euphonium, fluegelhorn, alto saxophone and piano.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1988 | DON HECKMAN
Talk about versatility. Or maybe the word is multipurpose. Or all-faceted. Take your choice. Any or all of the above apply to the playing of a remarkable Australian jazz musician named James Morrison. Working a one-nighter at Catalina's Bar & Grill Thursday, Morrison shifted, with no strain at all, between fluegelhorn, trombone and trumpet. A baritone horn, also available for action, didn't quite make it into the first set of music.
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