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James Moseley

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NEWS
June 30, 1990 | United Press International
The Senate Agriculture Committee approved the nomination of Indiana farmer James Moseley to hold the Agriculture Department's top environmental post. The nomination, approved Thursday, now goes to the Senate floor for a final vote. If confirmed as assistant agriculture secretary for natural resources and the environment, Moseley would oversee the Soil Conservation Service and the Forest Service.
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NEWS
June 30, 1990 | United Press International
The Senate Agriculture Committee approved the nomination of Indiana farmer James Moseley to hold the Agriculture Department's top environmental post. The nomination, approved Thursday, now goes to the Senate floor for a final vote. If confirmed as assistant agriculture secretary for natural resources and the environment, Moseley would oversee the Soil Conservation Service and the Forest Service.
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NEWS
August 30, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
A judge today ordered state officials to release a carpenter who has been jailed for 18 months under the state's 156-year-old sodomy law after he admitted having oral sex with his wife. DeKalb County Superior Judge Robert Castellani ordered the state to free James Moseley on his own recognizance until it can be determined if he should have a new trial or if his conviction should be overturned.
NEWS
August 31, 1989
A man who spent 18 months behind bars for having oral sex with his wife was freed from jail in Dacatur, Ga. James D. Moseley, 35, a carpenter, is believed to be the first man convicted under Georgia's 156-year-old sodomy law for conduct between marriage partners. A jury had found him guilty of sodomy without aggravation because he admitted on the stand that he had had oral sex with Bette Roberts, his common-law wife of four years.
NEWS
March 6, 1992 | From Associated Press
The Forest Service complied Thursday with a court order that it protect the northern spotted owl, restricting logging across 5.9 million acres at a projected cost of tens of thousands of jobs in the Northwest. The agency submitted its new owl management plan to U.S. District Judge William Dwyer of Seattle, who a year ago accused the Forest Service of a "deliberate and systematic refusal" to follow environmental laws.
NEWS
August 29, 1991 | Associated Press
Environmentalists on Wednesday condemned the Bush Administration's latest attempt to wipe out a federal wildlife regulation that is protecting the northern spotted owl at the expense of Northwest logging. "The hypocrisy of claiming to be an environmental President" and then perpetrating such a rule change "is corrupt, crooked and rotten," said Tim Hermach of the Native Forest Council in Eugene, Ore. U.S.
NEWS
November 26, 1989 | STEPHANIE SCHOROW, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Two women returned from a trip to Africa with a new avenue for their social and political connections--saving elephants from slaughter. Trisha Moseley and Susanna Colloredo founded International Tusk Force, a fledgling group devoted to banning international ivory trade. Their goal is to make the buying and wearing of ivory as politically unfashionable as eating California grapes during the United Farm Workers boycott of the 1960s and 1970s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1987
The U.S. Department of Education has awarded $89,000 to Chapman College to help underwrite the school's nationally acclaimed Freshman Seminar Program. The program this year is focusing on war and peace, and former U.S. Sen. Eugene McCarthy (D-Minn.) was a recent lecturer. Chapman's receipt of the federal grant was announced by James G. Moseley, the college's vice president for academic affairs.
SPORTS
September 19, 1991 | ANDREW BEYER, WASHINGTON POST
New England used to have a healthy tri-state racing circuit with Boston's Suffolk Downs its centerpiece. But the region became a model of the way not to run a racing industry. Greedy track owners, spurred on by greedy state legislatures, increased their racing dates until they overlapped and resulted in disastrous head-on competition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2013 | By Bob Pool
You don't have to be a rocket scientist to fight wildfires in the West. But it helps. A Valencia resident is turning to space-age technology to create improved fire safety shelters for firefighters who battle blazes in rugged and remote areas. Fire shelters are cocoon-like covers made of foil and woven silica cloth that are designed to provide emergency protection from flames as hot as 500 degrees. But the fire shelters, deployed as a last-ditch effort when firefighters are overrun by fast-moving blazes, have not always been effective.
REAL ESTATE
October 18, 1992 | H. JANE LEHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Lehman is a Washington, D.C., writer who specializes in real estate issues.
Bring up the name John Pozsgai with Henry Lamb and he is all but ready to propose Pozsgai for sainthood. To Jessica Landman, however, Pozsgai is hardly the "innocent victim of an abusive legal system" as he is sometimes portrayed, but a shameless criminal. The strikingly different portraits of Pozsgai are drawn by two warring factions: Lamb's private property rights movement and Landman's environmental lobby.
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