Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJames Naismith
IN THE NEWS

James Naismith

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
February 28, 2005 | J.A. Adande
Some of the great names in basketball history were in the house, among them Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton and the man who mentored them at UCLA, John Wooden. None carried the weight of Naismith. That's Ian Naismith, grandson of the game's inventor, James A. Naismith. And that's 60 pounds' worth of weight. It's in the form of a golden briefcase that contains the typewritten pages that brought the original 13 rules of basketball to the world.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
October 26, 2007 | Diane Pucin, Times Staff Writer
Luc Richard Mbah a Moute knows this about James Naismith: He invented basketball, and he was from Canada. Mbah a Moute was among three UCLA players nominated Thursday for the 2007-08 Naismith Trophy, awarded to the nation's top college player. Junior guard Darren Collison and junior forward Josh Shipp were also among the 50 nominees. "It's an honor," Mbah a Moute said. "But it doesn't matter right now. All that matters is the team. My health is good, my knees are fine."
Advertisement
SPORTS
October 26, 2007 | Diane Pucin, Times Staff Writer
Luc Richard Mbah a Moute knows this about James Naismith: He invented basketball, and he was from Canada. Mbah a Moute was among three UCLA players nominated Thursday for the 2007-08 Naismith Trophy, awarded to the nation's top college player. Junior guard Darren Collison and junior forward Josh Shipp were also among the 50 nominees. "It's an honor," Mbah a Moute said. "But it doesn't matter right now. All that matters is the team. My health is good, my knees are fine."
SPORTS
February 28, 2005 | J.A. Adande
Some of the great names in basketball history were in the house, among them Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton and the man who mentored them at UCLA, John Wooden. None carried the weight of Naismith. That's Ian Naismith, grandson of the game's inventor, James A. Naismith. And that's 60 pounds' worth of weight. It's in the form of a golden briefcase that contains the typewritten pages that brought the original 13 rules of basketball to the world.
SPORTS
June 5, 2000 | LARRY STEWART
What: "Basketball: the Dream Teams" Where: The History Channel, tonight, 9-11 It's appropriate that this two-hour documentary is on the History Channel because it is essentially a history of basketball. The title is a little misleading, as is the opening. A viewer at first might think it's about Olympic "dream teams." But soon the viewer is taken back to basketball's beginning, to 1891, when Dr. James Naismith invented the game.
SPORTS
December 21, 1991 | MICHAEL ARACE, HARTFORD COURANT
Somewhere in Brazil, the next Pele is shooting free throws. If that is hard to imagine, it shouldn't be. Although soccer remains the most popular sport in the world in terms of number of fans, there are more people in more places dribbling with their hands instead of their feet. Estimates indicate 250 million people in 176 countries are playing competitive basketball, and the game continues to grow at a staggering rate. Dr. James Naismith is responsible.
SPORTS
March 29, 1988 | BOB OATES, Times Staff Writer
The year before James Naismith invented basketball here 97 winters ago, he was a 29-year-old college student who played center on his school's football team, which was coached by a new teacher, Amos Alonzo Stagg. In time, Naismith was to become a medical doctor, but as an 1890 student he wore only three hats.
SPORTS
October 8, 1991
The free YMCA youth basketball clinic to be conducted Saturday by UC Irvine Coach Rod Baker is closed to high school players but is open to boys and girls in the first through eighth grades. High school players are excluded because of NCAA rules restricting contact between coaches and prospective student-athletes. Baker, a former Seton Hall assistant preparing for his first season at Irvine, will lead the one-hour clinic at the Newport-Costa Mesa Family YMCA at 10 a.m. Saturday.
BOOKS
March 1, 1992 | KAREN STABINER
ELEVATING THE GAME: Black Men and Basketball by Nelson George (HarperCollins: $20; 261 pp.) Dr. James Naismith invented the game of basketball 100 years ago, at a YMCA in Springfield, Mass. It took another 59 years before a black man was allowed to play the game professionally, even though, as with baseball, there was a thriving circuit of barnstorming teams, and even greater enthusiasm in schoolyards around the country.
SPORTS
October 14, 2009 | Mike Penner
In honor of John Wooden's 99th birthday, here are 99 things you may, or may not, know about the legendary former UCLA basketball coach: 1 . He was born in Martinsville, Ind., on Oct. 14, 1910. 2. Wooden led Martinsville High to the Indiana state title in 1927 and runner-up finishes in 1926 and 1928. 3. As a boy, one of his role models was Fuzzy Vandivier of the Franklin Wonder Five, a basketball team that dominated Indiana high school basketball from 1919 to 1922.
SPORTS
June 5, 2000 | LARRY STEWART
What: "Basketball: the Dream Teams" Where: The History Channel, tonight, 9-11 It's appropriate that this two-hour documentary is on the History Channel because it is essentially a history of basketball. The title is a little misleading, as is the opening. A viewer at first might think it's about Olympic "dream teams." But soon the viewer is taken back to basketball's beginning, to 1891, when Dr. James Naismith invented the game.
SPORTS
December 21, 1991 | MICHAEL ARACE, HARTFORD COURANT
Somewhere in Brazil, the next Pele is shooting free throws. If that is hard to imagine, it shouldn't be. Although soccer remains the most popular sport in the world in terms of number of fans, there are more people in more places dribbling with their hands instead of their feet. Estimates indicate 250 million people in 176 countries are playing competitive basketball, and the game continues to grow at a staggering rate. Dr. James Naismith is responsible.
SPORTS
March 29, 1988 | BOB OATES, Times Staff Writer
The year before James Naismith invented basketball here 97 winters ago, he was a 29-year-old college student who played center on his school's football team, which was coached by a new teacher, Amos Alonzo Stagg. In time, Naismith was to become a medical doctor, but as an 1890 student he wore only three hats.
TRAVEL
October 6, 2002 | Jane Engle
Hoops fans visiting Boston or Hartford, Conn., might consider a detour to Springfield, Mass., where the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame reopened last weekend as a $45-million high-tech museum. The striking new building, with a nine-story spherical dome lighted by hundreds of colored bulbs, is about twice as big as the previous one, spokesman Howie Davis said. It's part of a $100-million redevelopment of the Connecticut Riverfront area.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|