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August 24, 2007 | Mary McNamara, Times Staff Writer
Of course it couldn't end well. In the original book "The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" both fellows wound up dead, victim to the former's inability to control the latter's evil ways. So it's not surprising that Saturday's two-hour finale of BBC America's modern-day "Jekyll" racks up a few casualties. It's just too bad that the suspense and neck-prickling thrill of the previous episodes of what we still hope will be an ongoing series are among them.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2009 | Susan King
Despite the fact that he grew up in Northern Ireland during the height of the bloody conflict between Protestants and Catholics, actor James Nesbitt admits he "kind of had an idyllic and rural upbringing -- or so my parents keep telling me." Still, says the 44-year-old Protestant, "in a way, I think that was a complication for many like me. As the rest of the world was viewing where we came from with such pessimism, I thought it was the most beautiful place in the world to grow up."
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2005 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
The morning of the day he was to return home to England, James Nesbitt sat smoking in the patio of a Sunset Strip hotel, hung over but with his moss-green eyes still piercingly clear, and considered the newest phase of what he calls his "absurdly lucky" career. The Northern Ireland-born, 40-year-old star of the BBC cop drama "Murphy's Law" became a household name in Britain after his run as Adam, a romantic with bad habits, in BBC's smart "Friends"-like comedy "Cold Feet," which ended in 2003.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2007 | Mary McNamara, Times Staff Writer
Of course it couldn't end well. In the original book "The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" both fellows wound up dead, victim to the former's inability to control the latter's evil ways. So it's not surprising that Saturday's two-hour finale of BBC America's modern-day "Jekyll" racks up a few casualties. It's just too bad that the suspense and neck-prickling thrill of the previous episodes of what we still hope will be an ongoing series are among them.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2009 | Susan King
Despite the fact that he grew up in Northern Ireland during the height of the bloody conflict between Protestants and Catholics, actor James Nesbitt admits he "kind of had an idyllic and rural upbringing -- or so my parents keep telling me." Still, says the 44-year-old Protestant, "in a way, I think that was a complication for many like me. As the rest of the world was viewing where we came from with such pessimism, I thought it was the most beautiful place in the world to grow up."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2005
As an actor struggling to make a decent living in an increasingly difficult and overcrowded business, I have three words for Irish-born actor James Nesbitt ["Should He Stay or Should He Go Hollywood?" Jan. 23] as he grapples with the question of whether to remain in his native Great Britain or to make the jump to Hollywood: Please stay home. Dan Gilvezan Beverly Hills
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2002 | From Associated Press
He didn't win the best actor prize for which he'd been nominated, but the late Richard Harris was honored nonetheless at the fifth annual British Independent Film Awards. The award for his lifetime contribution to the cinema was accepted in London on Wednesday night by Harris' three sons: Damian, Jared and Jamie.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2007 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
The Golden Globe nominations appear to reflect the continuing British invasion of American television, with at least 16 nominations involving the United Kingdom and its actors. Hugh Laurie was nominated for Fox's "House"; Jim Broadbent, Andy Serkis and Samantha Morton for HBO's "Longford," and Ruth Wilson for PBS' "Jane Eyre." Jason Isaacs received a nod for "The State Within," as did James Nesbitt for "Jekyll," both of which were made in partnership between the BBC and BBC America.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2011 | By Sheri Linden, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Borrowing from "The Wizard of Oz," Emilio Estevez sets a ragtag quartet of seekers on a long trek in his new film, "The Way. " Their Yellow Brick Road is the Way of St. James, or El Camino de Santiago, one of Western Europe's most famous Christian pilgrimage routes. The gentle drama offers an intriguing look at the contemporary version of an ancient ritual, and is anchored by the on-screen work of the writer-director's father, Martin Sheen. But Estevez doesn't push far enough, opting to focus on generic lessons in camaraderie and the primacy of the moment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jim Nesbitt, 75, who wrote country music songs that drew both laughter and critical acclaim, died Thursday of congestive heart failure at his home in Florence, S.C., his son, Timothy Nesbitt, told the Associated Press. Known by some as the "King of Country Comedy," Nesbitt made the Billboard country charts 13 times from 1961 to 1970. "Looking for More in '64" reached No. 7, and "Please Mr. Kennedy," which had the same melody as "The Ballad of Davy Crockett," hit No. 11 in 1961.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2005 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
The morning of the day he was to return home to England, James Nesbitt sat smoking in the patio of a Sunset Strip hotel, hung over but with his moss-green eyes still piercingly clear, and considered the newest phase of what he calls his "absurdly lucky" career. The Northern Ireland-born, 40-year-old star of the BBC cop drama "Murphy's Law" became a household name in Britain after his run as Adam, a romantic with bad habits, in BBC's smart "Friends"-like comedy "Cold Feet," which ended in 2003.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2002 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Lucky Break" is an amiably engaging British prison comedy with just enough serious shading to set off its humor; it was directed by "The Full Monty's" Peter Cattaneo with the same affection for the vicissitudes of game but feckless men that made the earlier film a hit. Developed from an idea of Cattaneo into a script by Ronan Bennett, "Lucky Break," however, has a strong enough personality not to be merely a reworking of "Monty," despite certain similarities.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2012 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Those who showed Wednesday for “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey” premiere in Wellington, New Zealand, were not to be disappointed by the scope of the film's premiere. Tens of thousands of fans, some in elf ears and wizard hats, were witness to a red carpet a third of a mile long and a flyover by a “Hobbit”-themed Air New Zealand 777 jet as director Peter Jackson's latest J.R.R. Tolkien-inspired effort was revealed down under. Martin Freeman, who plays Bilbo Baggins, bubbled with praise for his director.
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