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James Newton Howard

NEWS
December 5, 2007 | TOM O'NEIL
RECENT changes in the voting process and campaigning for music Oscars may be altering old patterns of who wins. Starting this year, contenders are no longer permitted to send audio CDs of songs and scores to members of the academy's music branch; voters now must experience tunes within the visual context of a film. In 2005, voters began determining song nominees by judging three-minute video clips from each film that are strung together at screenings held in Los Angeles and New York.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1998
THE BIG 8 Picture Kenneth Turan: Titanic Kevin Thomas: Titanic Actress Kenneth Turan: Helen Hunt (As Good as It Gets) Kevin Thomas: Hunt Actor Kenneth Turan: Robert Duvall (The Apostle) Kevin Thomas: Peter Fonda (Ulee's Gold) Supporting Actress Kenneth Turan: Gloria Stuart (Titanic) Kevin Thomas: Gloria Stuart Supporting Actor Kenneth Turan: Robin Williams (Good Will Hunting) Kevin Thomas: Burt Reynolds (Boogie Nights) Director Kenneth Turan: James Cameron (Titanic) Kevin Thomas: Cameron
NEWS
January 16, 1991 | BETTY GOODWIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There was no ignoring the gulf crisis, even amid the fur coats, jeweled necklines and dinner tables sprouting yellow orchids at the annual scholarship fund-raiser for Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Security on Sunday night was noticeably beefed up at the Century Plaza because of concerns about terrorist activity in U.S. hotels, and there was a certain pall to the gaiety. Noted Gregory Peck: "What can I say?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2008 | Lisa Rosen
EVEN with its big-ticket attractions, the Palm Springs International Film Festival keeps a casual, hometown feel. Sure, it's the place to see all the documentaries and short films on the Oscar short list, most of the submissions for the academy's foreign-language film category and a ballroom full of stars at the awards-night gala. But there are plenty of other rides at this fair, all accessible, and some are quite tuneful.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1993
Leonard Feather's dismissal of the film soundtrack as a viable source of listening pleasure--"Except for those written for musicals, few soundtrack scores have a logical raison d'etre"--is demonstrative of the cavalier attitude The Times has exhibited toward this exacting and very wonderful genre ("Bits, Pieces of 'X' Can Only Deliver Stirring Moments," Dec. 13). First, it is a rare film (feature or TV) review that deigns to even name the composer, much less intelligently discuss the music's merits as an important and often pivotal aspect of the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2000 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
A man's face fills the screen. His eyes expand in terror, his mouth opens double-wide, he screams "AVALANCHE" as if the fate of nations hung on the word. You can run, you can hide, but ready or not, "Vertical Limit" is that kind of a movie. In theory, these high-octane extravaganzas, old-fashioned in form but bristling with up-to-the-minute special-effects technology, should be business as usual for Hollywood. In reality, making a success of high-altitude heroics is something of a lost art.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1996 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Primal Fear" makes fools of us and makes us like it. A tight courtroom melodrama that serves up twist after twist like so many baffling knuckle balls, this film handles its suspenseful material with skill and style. Adapted from a best-selling William Diehl potboiler by Steve Shagan and Ann Biderman, "Primal Fear" follows top Chicago defense attorney Martin Vail through the case of his life, one with enough ups and downs to reduce Perry Mason to tears.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2008 | Todd Martens and Margaret Wappler
What's a bust for some is a boon for others. The music industry might be fragmenting to bits, but other media are picking up the pieces. Movies, television and YouTube are increasingly proving to be the way to find out about a great song or artist. Witness the ascension of M.I.A.'s "Paper Planes" -- an underground sleeper one minute, the next a Grammy-nominated hit, thanks to exposure in the trailer for "Pineapple Express" and more recently, the critically adored "Slumdog Millionaire."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1993 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Dr. Richard Kimble never quits, never rests, barely even stops to catch his breath, and neither does the film that capitalizes on his dilemma. "The Fugitive" (citywide) is a super-adrenalized stemwinder, a crisp and jolting melodrama that screws the tension so pitilessly tight it does everything but squeak. Laced though it is with breakneck chases and eye-widening stunts, "The Fugitive" paradoxically succeeds because of qualities like intelligence and wit not always associated with thrillers.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2005 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
Back in the days of Apollo -- the space missions, not the Greek and Roman god -- teachers used to bring in TVs to allow schoolchildren to watch the splashdown of space capsules carrying men returning from the moon. Like weekday World Series games, the experience is now alien to a generation of kids more familiar with science fiction than science fact. Tom Hanks was 13 on July 20, 1969, when Neil Armstrong became the first man to walk on the moon.
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