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NEWS
May 24, 1995 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anti-government activist James D. Nichols received a low-key welcome home to Michigan's "thumb" region Tuesday from a small group of friends, neighbors and fellow farmers who tended his crops while he was in custody on federal explosives charges and as a possible material witness in the Oklahoma City bombing. Nichols tearfully told reporters earlier in the day that he wanted "to try to get my life back together" by returning to his farm chores.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2014 | Richard Winton
Jurors are scheduled to begin deliberating Friday in the excessive force and civil rights case of Brian Mulligan, a former co-chairman of Universal Pictures, against the Los Angeles Police Department. The onetime Deutsche Bank vice chairman suffered multiple nose fractures, a broken shoulder blade and a bloody scalp after two officers took him into custody in Highland Park in May 2012, he says. Mulligan's attorney, Louis “Skip” Miller, said Thursday in closing arguments that his client's testimony and medical evidence show he was struck in the face with a baton by officer James Nichols.
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NEWS
May 23, 1995 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a setback for the prosecution, a federal judge Monday ordered the release of James D. Nichols, who was being held as a possible witness in the Oklahoma City bombing investigation. Nichols, under indictment on grounds that he conspired to make explosives on his Michigan farm with two others accused in the bombing, was freed on his personal recognizance after being jailed for a month. In freeing the 41-year-old Nichols, U.S. District Judge Paul D.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2014 | By Richard Winton
A federal jury found Friday that two Los Angeles police officers had not used excessive force when arresting a onetime bank and Hollywood executive whom they believed to be under the influence of drugs known as bath salts. Brian Mulligan, 54, a former Deutsche Bank vice chairman, sued the Los Angeles Police Department and two of its officers, claiming that James Nichols and John Miller had used batons to break his nose and shoulder during the May 16, 2012, encounter. After hearing three days of testimony, jurors took less than three hours to reach a verdict, finding that the officers had not violated Mulligan's federal or state civil rights or battered him. Much of the trial focused on Mulligan's mental state that night.
NEWS
April 23, 1995 | JUDY PASTERNAK and GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Just days ago, when it was still an ordinary spring, the farmers, loggers and factory hands in these parts had plenty on their minds: the cold weather that kept corn stubble littering the untilled fields, the high cost of fertilizer, the faraway O.J. Simpson trial and, of course, the Oklahoma City bombing that killed more people than any terrorist action on this nation's soil. Most sighed over the scores of lost lives and opined that the roots of the deadly explosion likely lay overseas.
NEWS
April 27, 1995
President Clinton wore one. So did Billy Graham. They adorn the protective gear of rescuers, the badges of cops and the camouflage fatigues of military guards. They are ribbons of purple, yellow, blue, white, green and, of course, black, for the victims of the bombing of the federal building. "We felt there needed to be an outward symbol of caring and compassion," said Diane Sizemore, former president of a 150-member civic group in Oklahoma City.
NEWS
May 3, 1995 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
James D. Nichols, who is being held as a material witness in connection with the Oklahoma City bombing, once told a neighbor that Timothy J. McVeigh was testing homemade bombs and that it was possible to build one large enough to destroy a federal building, an FBI agent testified Tuesday. The FBI agent, Randal Farmer, said the conversation occurred after the neighbor visited the Nichols farm and smelled chemical fumes near a large shed. "My brother and an old Army buddy are out making bombs."
NEWS
April 26, 1995 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a day of swiftly unfolding developments, the federal government Tuesday accused two brothers, Terry Lynn Nichols and James Douglas Nichols, of taking part in a conspiracy to build bombs but stopped short of charging them in connection with the Oklahoma City explosion a week ago. The charges link the two brothers to Timothy J. McVeigh, who has been accused in the bombing. The brothers had been held since the weekend as material witnesses in the case.
NEWS
April 29, 1995 | RONALD J. OSTROW and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Three members of a family involved in gun dealing have been subpoenaed to appear before a federal grand jury investigating the Oklahoma City bombing, federal authorities said Friday, as investigators turned up new evidence on how the massive explosion occurred. Subpoenas have been issued demanding grand jury appearances next Tuesday by Ed Paulsen, the owner of a military supply store in Antigo, Wis., his wife, Linda, and his son David, all licensed gun dealers.
NEWS
May 28, 1995 | STEPHEN BRAUN and JUDY PASTERNAK, This story was reported by Times staff writers Stephen Braun and Judy Pasternak in Michigan, Louis Sahagun in Kansas and David G. Savage in Nevada. It was written by Pasternak and Braun
They consider themselves apostles of liberty, but for the last six weeks Terry and James Nichols have been prisoners of a government they do not recognize. Terry Lynn Nichols, a 40-year-old with a bank teller's countenance, is confined to an isolation cell in the El Reno Federal Correctional Institution in Oklahoma. His death may be sought by authorities he believes have seized unlawful power. When he appears in court, Nichols shuffles like a windup toy, hobbled by iron shackles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2014 | By Richard Winton
A federal jury on Friday found that two Los Angeles police officers did not use excessive force when they arrested a one-time bank and Hollywood executive they believed to be under the influence of the drug bath salts. Brian Mulligan, 54, sued the Los Angeles Police Department and two of its officers, James Nichols and John Miller, in federal court. He alleged they violated his civil rights, used unreasonable force and committed battery during a May 16, 2012, arrest. The decision by the eight-person jury means there will not be a second phase of the trial to decide whether the city negligently supervised the officers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2014 | Joel Rubin, Los Angeles Times
A woman who accused two Los Angeles police officers of threatening her with jail unless she had sex with them will be paid $575,000 to settle her lawsuit against the city. The City Council voted unanimously Wednesday to approve the payout to the woman, who is one of four women to accuse officers James Nichols and Luis Valenzuela of coercing them into having sex with them, according to court documents. The Times generally does not name alleged sex crime victims. Nichols and Valenzuela, both 41, were working as narcotics detectives in Hollywood in 2010 when they arrested the woman, according to one of her attorneys, Dennis Chang, and a search warrant affidavit LAPD investigators filed as part of a criminal investigation into the officers' conduct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2014 | By Joel Rubin
A woman who accused two Los Angeles police officers of threatening her with jail unless she had sex with them will be paid $575,000 to drop her lawsuit against the city. The City Council voted unanimously Wednesday to approve the payout to the woman, whom LAPD investigators believe is one of at least four women James Nichols and Luis Valenzuela coerced into sex. The Times generally does not name alleged victims of sex crimes. Nichols and Valenzuela, both 41, were working as narcotics detectives in Hollywood in 2010 when they arrested the woman, according to one of her attorneys, Dennis Chang, and a search warrant affidavit LAPD investigators filed as part of their criminal investigation into the officers' conduct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2013 | By Joel Rubin
Los Angeles police officials are seeking to fire two officers after an internal investigation determined that they pressured women to engage in sex acts with them in their car while on duty, sources said. The officers, James Nichols and Luis Valenzuela, have been ordered to appear at disciplinary hearings, where it will be decided whether to fire them. Through his attorney, Nichols denied wrongdoing. Neither Valenzuela nor his attorney could be reached. Although department officials have remained tight-lipped, the allegations against the officers are detailed in a search warrant affidavit filed by an investigator involved in an ongoing criminal investigation into the officers' conduct.
NEWS
May 28, 1995 | STEPHEN BRAUN and JUDY PASTERNAK, This story was reported by Times staff writers Stephen Braun and Judy Pasternak in Michigan, Louis Sahagun in Kansas and David G. Savage in Nevada. It was written by Pasternak and Braun
They consider themselves apostles of liberty, but for the last six weeks Terry and James Nichols have been prisoners of a government they do not recognize. Terry Lynn Nichols, a 40-year-old with a bank teller's countenance, is confined to an isolation cell in the El Reno Federal Correctional Institution in Oklahoma. His death may be sought by authorities he believes have seized unlawful power. When he appears in court, Nichols shuffles like a windup toy, hobbled by iron shackles.
NEWS
May 24, 1995 | PIERRE THOMAS, THE WASHINGTON POST
A close friend of Oklahoma City bombing suspect Timothy J. McVeigh has told authorities he was aware that suspect Terry L. Nichols would mix the chemicals that would be used in the April 19 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, sources familiar with the case said Tuesday. Michael Fortier of Kingman, Ariz., implicated Nichols in recent interviews with the FBI and federal prosecutors in which he also described McVeigh's plan to carry out the bombing, the worst terrorist act in U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2014 | By Richard Winton
A federal jury on Friday found that two Los Angeles police officers did not use excessive force when they arrested a one-time bank and Hollywood executive they believed to be under the influence of the drug bath salts. Brian Mulligan, 54, sued the Los Angeles Police Department and two of its officers, James Nichols and John Miller, in federal court. He alleged they violated his civil rights, used unreasonable force and committed battery during a May 16, 2012, arrest. The decision by the eight-person jury means there will not be a second phase of the trial to decide whether the city negligently supervised the officers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2014 | By Joel Rubin
A woman who accused two Los Angeles police officers of threatening her with jail unless she had sex with them will be paid $575,000 to drop her lawsuit against the city. The City Council voted unanimously Wednesday to approve the payout to the woman, whom LAPD investigators believe is one of at least four women James Nichols and Luis Valenzuela coerced into sex. The Times generally does not name alleged victims of sex crimes. Nichols and Valenzuela, both 41, were working as narcotics detectives in Hollywood in 2010 when they arrested the woman, according to one of her attorneys, Dennis Chang, and a search warrant affidavit LAPD investigators filed as part of their criminal investigation into the officers' conduct.
NEWS
May 24, 1995 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anti-government activist James D. Nichols received a low-key welcome home to Michigan's "thumb" region Tuesday from a small group of friends, neighbors and fellow farmers who tended his crops while he was in custody on federal explosives charges and as a possible material witness in the Oklahoma City bombing. Nichols tearfully told reporters earlier in the day that he wanted "to try to get my life back together" by returning to his farm chores.
NEWS
May 23, 1995 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a setback for the prosecution, a federal judge Monday ordered the release of James D. Nichols, who was being held as a possible witness in the Oklahoma City bombing investigation. Nichols, under indictment on grounds that he conspired to make explosives on his Michigan farm with two others accused in the bombing, was freed on his personal recognizance after being jailed for a month. In freeing the 41-year-old Nichols, U.S. District Judge Paul D.
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