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James Nicholson

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NEWS
January 19, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The new Republican National Committee chairman promised to target female and minority voters aggressively in his mission to "grow the party with the aim of winning the White House in the year 2000." Colorado developer James Nicholson told reporters he hoped to grow into the influential role enjoyed by his predecessor, Haley Barbour, a major force in shaping GOP legislative and campaign strategy.
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NEWS
September 29, 1999 | From Associated Press
Republican Party Chairman Jim Nicholson told presidential hopeful Patrick J. Buchanan on Tuesday that bolting to the Reform Party could help elect a Democratic president next year and put liberal judges on the Supreme Court.
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NEWS
January 18, 1997 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Members of the Republican National Committee on Friday chose as their new chairman James Nicholson of Colorado, a veteran organization man and staunch conservative. Nicholson, who defeated candidates with higher public profiles or who represent more populous states--including California--succeeds Haley Barbour. A 58-year-old home-builder from suburban Denver, Nicholson pledged to be "a forceful messenger for conservative ideals and values."
NEWS
November 17, 1998 | From Associated Press
Fighting to save his job, Republican Party Chairman Jim Nicholson warned Monday that a challenge to his leadership could trigger "turmoil or a blood bath" inside the GOP. His rivals continued to gauge support for his ouster. Nicholson's remarks angered some fellow Republicans who think a challenge is increasingly likely and should not be met with such blunt rhetoric. "I was shocked," said Richard Bearden, executive director of the Arkansas GOP.
NEWS
September 29, 1999 | From Associated Press
Republican Party Chairman Jim Nicholson told presidential hopeful Patrick J. Buchanan on Tuesday that bolting to the Reform Party could help elect a Democratic president next year and put liberal judges on the Supreme Court.
NEWS
November 17, 1998 | From Associated Press
Fighting to save his job, Republican Party Chairman Jim Nicholson warned Monday that a challenge to his leadership could trigger "turmoil or a blood bath" inside the GOP. His rivals continued to gauge support for his ouster. Nicholson's remarks angered some fellow Republicans who think a challenge is increasingly likely and should not be met with such blunt rhetoric. "I was shocked," said Richard Bearden, executive director of the Arkansas GOP.
NEWS
June 6, 1997 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The highest-ranking CIA officer ever caught spying for a foreign country was sentenced Thursday to more than 23 years in prison after confessing he sold out the United States for money to give his children a better life after the collapse of his tumultuous marriage. Harold James Nicholson, a former CIA station chief overseas, appeared in federal court in Alexandria, Va., and apologized to his family for his actions.
NEWS
March 4, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former CIA case officer Harold James Nicholson pleaded guilty to spying for the Russians and agreed to tell federal investigators what secrets he gave away and to turn over all his property to the government. Nicholson, 46, the highest-ranking CIA employee to be caught spying, faces a maximum sentence of life in prison and a $250,000 fine. But he could get as little as 22 to 27 years if the government recommends that he get credit for cooperating with the CIA and FBI, U.S.
NEWS
January 13, 1998 | From Associated Press
Two key antiabortion Republicans said Monday they are against the call for an abortion "litmus test" for GOP candidates, even as a Republican governor announced his support. Rep. Henry J. Hyde (R-Ill.), a longtime leader of antiabortion forces in Congress, and Rep. Charles T. Canady (R-Fla.
NEWS
December 21, 1996 | From the Washington Post
Federal prosecutors said Friday they intend to place espionage suspect Harold James Nicholson in isolated confinement and may seek the death penalty against the former CIA case officer. The government raised the possibility of execution in a written brief to U.S. District Judge James C. Cacheris, arguing that Nicholson should not be released on bond. They wrote that "the United States is still reviewing numerous documents" to determine if his case warrants the death penalty.
NEWS
June 6, 1997 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The highest-ranking CIA officer ever caught spying for a foreign country was sentenced Thursday to more than 23 years in prison after confessing he sold out the United States for money to give his children a better life after the collapse of his tumultuous marriage. Harold James Nicholson, a former CIA station chief overseas, appeared in federal court in Alexandria, Va., and apologized to his family for his actions.
NEWS
January 19, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The new Republican National Committee chairman promised to target female and minority voters aggressively in his mission to "grow the party with the aim of winning the White House in the year 2000." Colorado developer James Nicholson told reporters he hoped to grow into the influential role enjoyed by his predecessor, Haley Barbour, a major force in shaping GOP legislative and campaign strategy.
NEWS
January 18, 1997 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Members of the Republican National Committee on Friday chose as their new chairman James Nicholson of Colorado, a veteran organization man and staunch conservative. Nicholson, who defeated candidates with higher public profiles or who represent more populous states--including California--succeeds Haley Barbour. A 58-year-old home-builder from suburban Denver, Nicholson pledged to be "a forceful messenger for conservative ideals and values."
BUSINESS
February 26, 2009 | Associated Press
The owners of companies that managed hundreds of millions of dollars for universities and charities were arrested Wednesday on suspicion of looting their investment funds. Paul Greenwood, 61, of North Salem, N.Y., and Stephen Walsh, 64, of Sands Point, N.Y., appeared in U.S. District Court in Manhattan on charges of conspiracy, securities fraud and wire fraud.
NATIONAL
December 5, 2012 | By Amy Hubbard
The case of severely injured New Hampshire boy James Nicholson is sad and sordid, and it has left authorities in the community tight-lipped. The 3-year-old -- allegedly beaten by his mother's boyfriend -- is reportedly out of the hospital, where he underwent brain surgery for a head injury that caused seizures. Roland Dow, 27, is charged with first- and second-degree assault, according to Associated Press.  Both Dow and James' mother, Jessica Linscott, face multiple charges of child endangerment.
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