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James O Mason

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NEWS
July 14, 1989
Health and Human Services Secretary Louis W. Sullivan named Dr. James O. Mason, assistant secretary for health, as acting surgeon general to replace the departing Dr. C. Everett Koop. Mason, formerly director of the Atlanta-based federal Centers for Disease Control, will serve in both capacities until Koop's term formally expires in October. Sullivan is expected to name a permanent surgeon general at that time.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1990 | DANIEL S. GREENBERG, Greenberg is editor of Science and Government Report, from which this is adapted.
With sufficient time having passed for the science establishment to have settled into familiarity with the Bush Administration, our verdict is that science has got itself a bitter-sweet relationship, mostly sweet. The President, who puts exceptional effort into being liked, has been especially attentive to two of the basic cravings of science in its dealings with government: money and recognition.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1990 | DANIEL S. GREENBERG, Greenberg is editor of Science and Government Report, from which this is adapted.
With sufficient time having passed for the science establishment to have settled into familiarity with the Bush Administration, our verdict is that science has got itself a bitter-sweet relationship, mostly sweet. The President, who puts exceptional effort into being liked, has been especially attentive to two of the basic cravings of science in its dealings with government: money and recognition.
NEWS
November 2, 1989 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A high-ranking federal health official said Wednesday that he will push for an indefinite extension of a 19-month ban on the use of federal funds for fetal tissue research because government support could be interpreted as an endorsement of abortions. Assistant Secretary of Health James O. Mason said he would refer his recommendation to the National Institutes of Health within 10 days, after consultation with Health and Human Services Secretary Louis W. Sullivan.
NEWS
November 2, 1989 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A high-ranking federal health official said Wednesday that he will push for an indefinite extension of a 19-month ban on the use of federal funds for fetal tissue research because government support could be interpreted as an endorsement of abortions. Assistant Secretary of Health James O. Mason said he would refer his recommendation to the National Institutes of Health within 10 days, after consultation with Health and Human Services Secretary Louis W. Sullivan.
NEWS
October 17, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
Health and Human Services Secretary Louis W. Sullivan is expected to act soon on a recommendation by Dr. James O. Mason, assistant secretary for health, to extend an 19-month-old ban on fetal tissue research, government sources said. Anti-abortion groups argue that to permit transplants of tissue from aborted fetuses would create a demand for the tissue, encouraging women to have abortions.
NEWS
July 7, 1993 | Reuters
Dr. Philip Lee has been sworn in as the new head of the U.S. Public Health Service, said Health and Human Services Secretary Donna Shalala on Tuesday. Lee replaces Dr. James O. Mason, who resigned Jan. 20 when President Clinton took office. The Public Health Service has an annual budget of $20 billion and 45,000 employees.
NEWS
November 1, 1989 | From Associated Press
Calling it a "moral issue," a top federal health official said today he intends to extend indefinitely the current ban on federal funding for research using fetal tissue from induced abortions. James O. Mason, assistant secretary for health at the Department of Health and Human Services, said he has the authority to make a decision on the ban and "the moratorium should be continued indefinitely." Health and Human Services Secretary Louis W.
NEWS
January 4, 1990 | From United Press International
William Roper, a White House adviser and former director of the Medicare and Medicaid programs, was named Wednesday to head the Centers for Disease Control. Roper, 41, on March 1 will take over a federal agency with 5,000 employees and an annual budget of $1.1 billion, including $450 million for AIDS-related work. The CDC has headquarters in Atlanta. The American Medical Assn.
NEWS
February 24, 1987 | United Press International
A federal health official told a public hearing on AIDS testing today that most people infected with the deadly virus "remain unaware of their infected status." Dr. Ward Cates of the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta said that 1,079 testing stations were in place at the end of 1986, checking primarily those individuals at high risk--homosexuals, intravenous drug users and hemophiliacs--and found an infection rate of 19%.
NEWS
July 14, 1989
Health and Human Services Secretary Louis W. Sullivan named Dr. James O. Mason, assistant secretary for health, as acting surgeon general to replace the departing Dr. C. Everett Koop. Mason, formerly director of the Atlanta-based federal Centers for Disease Control, will serve in both capacities until Koop's term formally expires in October. Sullivan is expected to name a permanent surgeon general at that time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1989 | DANIEL S. GREENBERG, Daniel S. Greenberg is the editor and publisher of Science & Government Report, a Washington-based newsletter.
With the extension of an irrational ban started by the Reagan Administration, the crackpots have won again on forbidding federal money for promising research on Parkinson's and other serious diseases. The triumph extends an ideological rampage that has dismayed the medical research establishment and caused several distinguished scientists to reject invitations to take senior government posts.
OPINION
November 26, 1989
The Bush Administration decision to extend the ban on federal funding of fetal tissue research may be a way to buy time for the President to rethink what appears to be an incomplete and flawed perception of this and the abortion issue. But any delay in this vital work could have life-and-death implications for millions of people. Dr. James O.
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