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James Ochoa

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2006 | Dana Parsons
You'll read elsewhere on this page today about the 21-year-old Buena Park man who pleaded guilty to an armed carjacking last year and then spent 10 months in prison before DNA evidence linked someone else to the crime. The 10 months followed six months in jail awaiting trial. I have no shame in trotting out a line I've used before in this kind of situation: If you think that's just a small injustice, then you go spend 10 months in state prison. Or 10 days. Or 10 hours.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2006 | Dana Parsons
You'll read elsewhere on this page today about the 21-year-old Buena Park man who pleaded guilty to an armed carjacking last year and then spent 10 months in prison before DNA evidence linked someone else to the crime. The 10 months followed six months in jail awaiting trial. I have no shame in trotting out a line I've used before in this kind of situation: If you think that's just a small injustice, then you go spend 10 months in state prison. Or 10 days. Or 10 hours.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2007 | Dana Parsons
A few days ago, I wrote about James Ochoa, a former gang member who may or may not get state compensation for the 10 months he spent in prison before DNA tests and another man's confession proved him not guilty. Ochoa had pleaded guilty to a crime he didn't commit because a witness had wrongly identified him and the trial judge told him he'd throw the book at him if convicted. Monday, President Bush commuted the 30-month perjury and obstruction of justice sentence of I.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2008 | H.G. Reza, Times Staff Writer
A state agency has recommended that a former Buena Park man be paid $31,700 for spending 10 months in prison for a carjacking he did not commit. On Wednesday, James Ochoa, 22, also reached a tentative $550,000 settlement of lawsuits he had filed against Buena Park, its Police Department and a dog handler involved in the investigation. Ochoa pleaded guilty on the third day of his trial in 2005 after Orange County Superior Court Judge Robert F.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2008 | DANA PARSONS
With California in financial trouble (who isn't?), I thought you'd like to know how the state is saving you money. It could have agreed to pay James Ochoa $31,700 for doing 10 months in the state pen for a carjacking he didn't commit. It said no. The state penal code authorizes a $100-a-day reimbursement to wrongly convicted inmates. The state knows Ochoa didn't do it because DNA led authorities to the guy who did.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 2008 | Jason Felch and Maura Dolan, Felch and Dolan are Times staff writers.
In June, Orange County Dist. Atty. Tony Rackauckas made a bold grab for a crown jewel of local law enforcement: the DNA unit of the sheriff's crime lab. With the lab's director out of town and the sheriff recently deposed by corruption charges, Rackauckas submitted a brief agenda item to county supervisors two business days before their regular meeting. "Our aim is to make significant changes in the way forensic DNA analysis is conducted," Rackauckas wrote. The D.A.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2008 | DANA PARSONS
A funny thing happened on James Ochoa's way to getting the shaft again. He didn't. If you've lost track of Ochoa's problems with the justice system, here's a list of people who have done him wrong since May 2005: Buena Park police, the Orange County district attorney's office, a trial judge, a deputy state attorney general, and a hearing officer for the state Victim Compensation and Government Claims Board.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2006 | H.G. Reza, Times Staff Writer
Three days into his trial for carjacking and armed robbery, James Ochoa weighed his options. He had turned down the prosecution's offer of a guilty plea in exchange for two years in state prison because he knew he was innocent. But Orange County Superior Court Judge Robert F. Fitzgerald had threatened him with a life sentence if convicted. Unwilling to risk life in prison, the 20-year-old ended his trial and pleaded guilty in December 2005.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2006 | H.G. Reza, Times Staff Writer
A device promoted as a law enforcement tool to help bloodhounds detect human scents at crime scenes has come under increasing fire after its use in recent years has led to the incarceration of at least five men whose cases were later dismissed. In the latest case, a Buena Park man was freed from prison in October after serving almost a year for a carjacking and armed robbery he did not commit.
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