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James Oelschlager

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NEWS
October 3, 2001 | JOSH FRIEDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid an epic stock market collapse, many mutual fund managers say they're trying as much as possible to maintain business as usual--and keep their focus on the long term. But managers' strategies in this deep bear market vary depending on their particular investment style (i.e., "value" or "growth"), the amount of cash they have available to put to work, whether they believe many stocks are bargains at current prices, and whether shareholders are staying put or pulling out.
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NEWS
January 8, 2001 | JOSH FRIEDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mutual fund investors may be thrilled that the Federal Reserve has begun to cut interest rates, but when they see their funds' year-end statements, many will wonder what took the Fed so long. As technology stocks plummeted amid a weakening economy, the average domestic stock fund sank 8% in the fourth quarter, according to fund tracker Morningstar Inc. That was the worst loss since the third quarter of 1998. For the average tech-sector fund, the fourth-quarter loss was a stunning 36%.
BUSINESS
December 23, 1997
Vanguard Group Chairman John C. Bogle, Charles Schwab Corp. Chairman Charles Schwab and Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Arthur Levitt will be among the featured speakers at The Times' second annual Investment Strategies Conference, to be held the weekend of Feb. 7-8 at the Los Angeles Convention Center downtown.
NEWS
April 9, 2001 | JOSH FRIEDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you think it's finally time to start loading up on what's beaten down in the market, you're probably looking at growth stocks or growth-stock mutual funds. No question, the damage has been dramatic over the last two quarters. And picking the ultimate bottom is nearly impossible. So, you may figure, why not start at least nibbling now?
BUSINESS
July 18, 2000 | WALTER HAMILTON
Editor's note: In the story above, Josh Friedman looks at the merits of buying "blend" funds rather than growth-stock or value-stock funds. Here, staff writer Walter Hamilton explains how he came to the conclusion that one growth-stock fund wasn't enough. * When I set out recently to invest in a new large-cap growth-stock fund, I had every intention of following conventional fund-buying wisdom.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2002 | JOSH FRIEDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's one upside to the devastating losses many stock mutual funds have incurred since 2000: A big chunk of any future gains may be sheltered from taxes. "Fund investors are at a rare advantage now because the portfolios have all these losses on their books that can offset future gains," said Steve Cohen, chief financial officer at money manager RS Investments in San Francisco. "It's not the reason you should buy a fund, but it's an added bonus, a silver lining."
BUSINESS
May 19, 1998 | RUSS WILES
In a great market for big-name stocks, White Oak Growth Stock fund has been at the head of its class. This Akron, Ohio-based mutual fund ranked among the top 2% of large-growth-stock funds in the five years through March 31, according to fund tracker Morningstar Inc. It also has remained a performance leader in the last year even as it has ballooned in size, with $600 million in new assets since late 1996.
BUSINESS
September 19, 2000 | JOSH FRIEDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's no wonder the investing Web site Maxfunds.com has dubbed Oak Associates founder James D. Oelschlager "Goldschlager." In this year's struggling stock market, Oelschlager's three mutual funds--White Oak Growth, Pin Oak Aggressive Stock and Red Oak Technology Select--have been gleaming. Through last week, the funds had produced year-to-date total returns of 31.6%, 47.5% and 63.2%, respectively. Those results were trouncing the blue-chip Standard & Poor's 500 index, which was up less than 1%. Beating the S&P has been a seemingly easy task for Oelschlager since 1998.
NEWS
October 9, 2000 | JOSH FRIEDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thinking big isn't paying off like it used to. Returns on large-capitalization stocks overall have been disappointing this year compared with many other market sectors. That brings to an end the dominance of blue-chip shares that marked most of the late 1990s. The average large-cap growth fund lost 0.2% in the third quarter and was up just 2.8% for the first nine months. The average large-cap value fund fared better, gaining 4.9% in the quarter, though the nine-month return was 3%.
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