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James P Gray

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1997 | JEAN O. PASCO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Orange County Superior Court Judge James P. Gray said Wednesday that, unlike his opponents, he is uniquely qualified to occupy the congressional seat now held by Rep. Loretta Sanchez (D-Garden Grove) because of his position as a jurist. "Probably all of the ills and problems in our society have come through my court," Gray said, formally announcing his campaign. "I've seen what happens when we have bad public policy, when we have badly drafted laws.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2001 | MONTE MORIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He describes himself as a conservative judge in a conservative county. But many of those who have watched the career of Orange County Superior Court Judge James P. Gray said his approach to the job is anything but traditional. Part rebel, part reformer, part conciliator, he has put together a record that keeps him in the limelight. Gray's views make him a frequent target.
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NEWS
November 17, 1999 | From Associated Press
Speaking at a drug policy forum in Albuquerque, an Orange County Superior Court judge added his voice Tuesday to that of New Mexico's governor calling for debate and reform of U.S. drug policy. Judge James P. Gray stopped short of saying he would legalize drugs, but he agrees with New Mexico Gov. Gary Johnson that the U.S. drug war is a failure. Calling Johnson a traitor to the drug war, as some have, pays the governor a compliment, he said.
NEWS
November 17, 1999 | From Associated Press
Speaking at a drug policy forum in Albuquerque, an Orange County Superior Court judge added his voice Tuesday to that of New Mexico's governor calling for debate and reform of U.S. drug policy. Judge James P. Gray stopped short of saying he would legalize drugs, but he agrees with New Mexico Gov. Gary Johnson that the U.S. drug war is a failure. Calling Johnson a traitor to the drug war, as some have, pays the governor a compliment, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2001 | MONTE MORIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He describes himself as a conservative judge in a conservative county. But many of those who have watched the career of Orange County Superior Court Judge James P. Gray said his approach to the job is anything but traditional. Part rebel, part reformer, part conciliator, he has put together a record that keeps him in the limelight. Gray's views make him a frequent target.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1993 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The politicians no longer curse his name, the sheriff has stopped questioning his sobriety and the television talk shows have gone on to other issues. But for Superior Court Judge James P. Gray, the crusade he started exactly a year ago this week when he publicly advocated legalizing adult use of marijuana, cocaine and heroin has not ended. "I feel that one person really can make a difference, and I'm very committed to this," said Gray in a recent interview.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1997 | JEFF KASS
Orange County Superior Court Judge James P. Gray, who has suggested legalizing drugs to end a losing drug war, will take a leave of absence beginning today to consider a run for U.S. Congress. Gray, 52, who has indicated an interest in the 46th Congressional District seat, announced his leave in a letter Tuesday to court employees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1989
Gov. George Deukmejian on Tuesday named an Orange County Municipal Court judge to the county Superior Court. Judge James P. Gray of Santa Ana, the son of a federal court judge, replaces Judge James K. Turner, who retired. The governor appointed Gray, 44, to the Municipal Court in 1983. Gray, who will make $89,851 in his new job, was an associate with the Newport Beach law firm Wyman, Bautzer, Rothmond, Kuchel & Silbert from 1979-83. Before that, he was an assistant U.S. attorney.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1996
* Orange County Superior Court Judge James P. Gray Orange County Superior Court Judge James P. Gray believes illegal drug use could be reduced by changing current policies. He is circulating a resolution that calls for updating laws that apply to medical and social treatment of drug problems. Gray, 51, advocates the sale of heroin, cocaine and marijuana at licensed commercial pharmacies. He spoke Wednesday with Times correspondent Mimi Ko Cruz.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1997 | JEAN O. PASCO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Orange County Superior Court Judge James P. Gray said Wednesday that, unlike his opponents, he is uniquely qualified to occupy the congressional seat now held by Rep. Loretta Sanchez (D-Garden Grove) because of his position as a jurist. "Probably all of the ills and problems in our society have come through my court," Gray said, formally announcing his campaign. "I've seen what happens when we have bad public policy, when we have badly drafted laws.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1997 | JEAN O. PASCO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Orange County Superior Court Judge James P. Gray began a leave of absence Wednesday to campaign for the congressional seat now held by Rep. Loretta Sanchez (D-Garden Grove). Gray, a Republican best known for supporting the decriminalization of drugs, has hinted for several weeks that he was weighing such a campaign. Republicans Lisa Hughes, a family law attorney and certified public accountant, and Anaheim City Councilman Bob Zemel also have announced their candidacies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1997 | JEFF KASS
Orange County Superior Court Judge James P. Gray, who has suggested legalizing drugs to end a losing drug war, will take a leave of absence beginning today to consider a run for U.S. Congress. Gray, 52, who has indicated an interest in the 46th Congressional District seat, announced his leave in a letter Tuesday to court employees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1996
* Orange County Superior Court Judge James P. Gray Orange County Superior Court Judge James P. Gray believes illegal drug use could be reduced by changing current policies. He is circulating a resolution that calls for updating laws that apply to medical and social treatment of drug problems. Gray, 51, advocates the sale of heroin, cocaine and marijuana at licensed commercial pharmacies. He spoke Wednesday with Times correspondent Mimi Ko Cruz.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1993 | KEVIN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Renewing his call for drug policy reform, Orange County Superior Court Judge James P. Gray on Monday picked up the endorsements of local developer Kathryn Thompson and a number of other officials who support his call for a national commission to study drug laws. "Without change, the situation is not going to get better," Los Angeles County Sheriff's Lt. Greg Morgon said at a news conference here. "The important thing is that we take a look at our entire policy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1993 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County Supervisor Thomas F. Riley and state Sen. Marian Bergeson (R-Newport Beach) are among those who support Orange County Superior Court Judge James P. Gray's call for serious drug policy reform, the judge announced Monday. Bergeson and Riley were among six prominent people in Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties who recently endorsed a resolution that calls for a presidential commission empowered by Congress to study and recommend changes in the nation's anti-drug laws.
NEWS
April 10, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
A day after he proposed making heroin, cocaine and marijuana legal because the "war on drugs has been lost," Orange County Superior Court Judge James P. Gray was under siege by officials and members of the public reacting to his idea. Telephone calls poured in to his courtroom as county and federal law enforcement officials formally denounced Gray's legalization proposal, likening it to a Pandora's box that would create as many problems as Gray said his plan would eliminate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1992 | MALAIKA BROWN
Superior Court Judge James P. Gray, who sparked debate when he proposed legalization of drugs in April, will discuss his views Sunday and June 14. Gray will appear Sunday to talk at Aldersgate United Methodist Church, 1201 Irvine Blvd. in Tustin, at 9 and 10:30 a.m. On June 14, Gray will be the guest speaker at the county chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union's annual Flag Day Picnic at William R. Mason Regional Park in Irvine. He is scheduled to speak at noon.
NEWS
April 8, 1993 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The politicians no longer curse his name, the sheriff has stopped questioning his sobriety, and the television talk shows have gone on to other controversial issues. But Superior Court Judge James P. Gray's crusade to decriminalize drug use, launched a year ago, is far from over. "I feel that one person really can make a difference, and I'm very committed to this," Gray said recently. "I think it would save lives, and I don't intend to stop."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1993 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The politicians no longer curse his name, the sheriff has stopped questioning his sobriety and the television talk shows have gone on to other issues. But for Superior Court Judge James P. Gray, the crusade he started exactly a year ago this week when he publicly advocated legalizing adult use of marijuana, cocaine and heroin has not ended. "I feel that one person really can make a difference, and I'm very committed to this," said Gray in a recent interview.
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