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James P Linn

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1990 | TIM WATERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles chapter of the Federal Bar Assn. called the panel discussion "The White-Collar Prosecution From the Defendant's Perspective." It could have been called "Tales From the Acquitted." Four onetime, high-profile defendants accused of white-collar crimes but later cleared gathered at a downtown Los Angeles hotel Saturday and were given the opportunity to vent their anger and frustration at federal prosecutors before an audience of prosecutors and others.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1990 | TIM WATERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles chapter of the Federal Bar Assn. called the panel discussion "The White-Collar Prosecution From the Defendant's Perspective." It could have been called "Tales From the Acquitted." Four onetime, high-profile defendants accused of white-collar crimes but later cleared gathered at a downtown Los Angeles hotel Saturday and were given the opportunity to vent their anger and frustration at federal prosecutors before an audience of prosecutors and others.
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NEWS
July 10, 1990 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL and KRISTINA M. LUZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Saudi financier Adnan Khashoggi, who was acquitted of fraud charges last week along with Imelda Marcos, has agreed to waive all personal claims to millions of dollars in art and real estate acquired from Mrs. Marcos and her late husband, former Philippine dictator Ferdinand E. Marcos, it was learned Monday. In exchange, federal racketeering charges still pending against him will be dropped. "My client is tired of being in our country's courts," attorney James P.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1990 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles federal court judge Friday rejected Imelda Marcos' contention that she had negotiated an agreement to end a multibillion-dollar fraud suit lodged against her and her late husband, former Philippine dictator Ferdinand Marcos. Marcos and her lawyers asserted that Philippine government officials had agreed to end the suit in exchange for 60% of the remaining Marcos funds in five Hong Kong banks.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1985 | Associated Press
Carl Icahn proceeded Wednesday with his $8.06-billion bid to acquire Phillips Petroleum Co. after a federal judge in Oklahoma removed some legal obstacles that had threatened to delay the New York financier. Wall Street sources, who spoke on condition that they not be identified, said Icahn was pursuing commitments to raise $4 billion to finance the first step of his takeover plan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1990 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imelda Marcos, after negotiating directly with secret emissaries of the Philippine government, claimed through her Los Angeles attorneys Monday that Manila has agreed to drop its multibillion-dollar damage suit against her in exchange for 60% of whatever funds remain in various Hong Kong banks. Her claim was disputed by lawyers for the Philippines. U.S. District Judge Mariana R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2000 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Merrill Lynch agreed Monday to turn over to a U.S. court more than $35.3 million being sought by Filipino citizens who won a human rights lawsuit against their late President Ferdinand E. Marcos. Plaintiffs' attorney Robert A. Swift said after a closed-door meeting in the chambers of U.S. District Judge Manuel L. Real that the brokerage house had agreed to let Real decide who is entitled to the money.
NEWS
November 13, 1991 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles federal judge has frozen $320 million in Swiss and Hong Kong bank accounts that were secretly set up by late Philippine President Ferdinand E. Marcos. U.S. District Judge Manuel L. Real imposed the freeze last week after lawyers representing Philippine torture victims in a lawsuit persuaded the judge that the money might be spent by Marcos' widow and children before the suit concludes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1991 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imelda Marcos was ordered Monday to stand trial in Los Angeles federal court next year on charges that she and her late husband, Philippine dictator Ferdinand Marcos, looted their homeland of up to $5 billion. U.S. District Judge Mariana R. Pfaelzer set a May 5, 1992, date for the civil fraud trial after issuing a final denial of claims by defense lawyers that the case had been settled last year with an exchange of letters between Philippine and Marcos representatives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1990 | VICTOR MERINA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shorn of her bodyguards and far from the tumult of loyalists and enemies, Imelda Marcos sat in her Beverly Hills hotel room nibbling at a pepperoni pizza and noted that on her last visit here she was the First Lady of the Philippines who dined with industrialist Armand Hammer.
NEWS
February 25, 1999 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The 13-year legal battle to secure compensation for human rights victims of former Philippine dictator Ferdinand E. Marcos appears to have finally concluded, with the announcement Wednesday of a $150-million settlement. The announcement represents the culmination of years of on-and-off negotiations, complicated by the fractious nature of Philippine politics and the fact that Marcos' money was tied up in Swiss bank accounts with contested ownership.
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