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James Perkins

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NEWS
September 13, 2000 | From Associated Press
Businessman James Perkins was elected Selma's first black mayor Tuesday, ousting a former segregationist, in one of several state primaries. In Vermont, two Republican legislators who voted for the state's civil union law for gay couples were ousted, three more were trailing badly and a Democrat who opposed it also was defeated. In New York, party-swapping Rep. Michael P.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2005 | John M. Glionna, Times Staff Writer
Andy Coulter's eyes widen as he spies the red pickup. Cruising a wooded back road outside town, he glares into his rear-view mirror and hits the brakes on his old Ford, ready to pull a U-turn. He's convinced he's spotted James Richard Perkins, an eighth-grade dropout and convicted rapist. Perkins has been identified by the state as "high-risk," the most serious category for paroled sex offenders.
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NEWS
October 22, 2000 | JEFFREY GETTLEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not even a week into his term as Selma's first black mayor, James Perkins Jr. had to stand face to face with a cast-iron reminder of his town's openly racist ways. There, under one of the arching, graying oak trees that line the streets and make Selma feel as old as it is, glared Nathan Bedford Forrest, a Confederate general who died 123 years ago. No matter that the great cavalry man had been reduced to a hollow bust and block of granite.
NEWS
October 22, 2000 | JEFFREY GETTLEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not even a week into his term as Selma's first black mayor, James Perkins Jr. had to stand face to face with a cast-iron reminder of his town's openly racist ways. There, under one of the arching, graying oak trees that line the streets and make Selma feel as old as it is, glared Nathan Bedford Forrest, a Confederate general who died 123 years ago. No matter that the great cavalry man had been reduced to a hollow bust and block of granite.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2005 | John M. Glionna, Times Staff Writer
Andy Coulter's eyes widen as he spies the red pickup. Cruising a wooded back road outside town, he glares into his rear-view mirror and hits the brakes on his old Ford, ready to pull a U-turn. He's convinced he's spotted James Richard Perkins, an eighth-grade dropout and convicted rapist. Perkins has been identified by the state as "high-risk," the most serious category for paroled sex offenders.
NEWS
April 7, 1990
James E. Perkins, 84, former managing director of the National Tuberculosis Assn., now the American Lung Assn. The epidemiologist was part of the first delegation to the World Health Organization formed after World War II and worked for the New York State Health Department as commissioner and director of communicable diseases before joining the tuberculosis association. During World War II he was a senior surgeon with the Public Health Service Reserve. In Laguna Hills, Calif., on March 25.
NEWS
March 23, 1995
West Hollywood deputies had their crime-fighting job made easier when a robber chose to hold up a bank across the street from the sheriff's station on Santa Monica Boulevard. The alarm was sounded shortly after the robbery at noon Monday, which netted $1,500. Shortly afterward, a witness called to say that the suspect had been spotted about a block away. Motorcycle Deputy Sean Ruiz began combing the area, peering down residential driveways looking for the suspect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2004 | From a Times Staff Writer
Ventura police warned Friday that a sex offender has been paroled to the city. James Richard Perkins, 43, moved into the 100 block of West Harrison Street this week, Lt. Quinn Fenwick said. Perkins was convicted in Northern California of assault to commit rape, rape and sexual penetration and served about 20 years in prison, Fenwick said. State law requires paroled sex offenders to register with police, who may publicize their names and addresses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Joe Smitherman, 75, who was a young, newly elected mayor of Selma, Ala., during the 1965 "Bloody Sunday" confrontation between law enforcement officers and protesters, died Sunday in a Montgomery, Ala., hospital. He had undergone surgery after breaking a hip in a fall at his home Thursday. Smitherman was elected to the Selma City Council in 1960 when he was 30 and served as mayor from 1964 until he was defeated in 2000 by James Perkins Jr., Selma's first black mayor.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1992 | DON HECKMAN
When Bobby Lyle ripped into his first chorus at the Strand Friday night, his dramatic presentation called up an illusion of watching Franz Liszt play jazz. Like the virtuosic 19th-Century composer-pianist, Lyle revels in a high-speed, rapid-fire technique that sacrifices neither the magnitude nor the character of his music. Lyle's opening work was an up-tempo samba, "Flight to Rio," from his new album.
NEWS
September 13, 2000 | From Associated Press
Businessman James Perkins was elected Selma's first black mayor Tuesday, ousting a former segregationist, in one of several state primaries. In Vermont, two Republican legislators who voted for the state's civil union law for gay couples were ousted, three more were trailing badly and a Democrat who opposed it also was defeated. In New York, party-swapping Rep. Michael P.
NEWS
April 7, 1990
James E. Perkins, 84, former managing director of the National Tuberculosis Assn., now the American Lung Assn. The epidemiologist was part of the first delegation to the World Health Organization formed after World War II and worked for the New York State Health Department as commissioner and director of communicable diseases before joining the tuberculosis association. During World War II he was a senior surgeon with the Public Health Service Reserve. In Laguna Hills, Calif., on March 25.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2004 | From a Times Staff Writer
A sex offender recently paroled to Ventura has moved to another neighborhood, police announced this week. James Richard Perkins, 43, was moved by the state parole office to the 1600 block of East Thompson Boulevard, Police Lt. Doug Auldridge said. Perkins had been living in the 100 block of West Harrison Street, he said. The reason for the move was unclear, Auldridge said. Parole officials could not be reached for comment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1994 | AL MARTINEZ
R.D. Williams is an ordinary guy who runs a small machine shop that makes polished aluminum swords for theme parks and movie studios. His "earnings" last year were minus $12,000 and the year before that minus $14,000. Any day soon, R.D. always used to say, he was going to start making some real money. But he never expected it to come from Taco Bell. The way R.D.
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