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James Perse

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MAGAZINE
September 8, 2002 | LAURIE PIKE
Like father, like son? Not when it comes to James Perse, whose father, Tommy, owns L.A.'s out-there style emporium Maxfield. Perse pere may be known as the man who brought Yohji Yamamoto to L.A., but his designer son prefers plain old T-shirts. "It took years 'til my dad would wear my stuff," says 30-year-old James. "But now, underneath his wild get-ups, he wears my T-shirts."
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BUSINESS
December 6, 2011 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Clothing retailer James Perse has put a Hollywood Hills-area house up for sale at $3.75 million or for lease at $14,500 a month. The property has been rented out in recent years. The mid-century home, which is in the celebrity-populated "bird streets" area above the Sunset Strip, devotes its 2,300 square feet to open living space, one bedroom with a fireplace and oversized walk-in closet, and 1 3/4 bathrooms. The contemporary house sits behind gates on about a third of an acre with a swimming pool, spa and outdoor shower.
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IMAGE
June 21, 2009 | Adam Tschorn
It's hard to imagine a father and son who have shaped Los Angeles fashion as profoundly -- and as differently -- as Tommy Perse and his son James. In the 1970s, the elder Perse introduced the black-clad look to Southern California, through his influential West Hollywood store Maxfield. In the '80s, Tommy Perse was the first to bring the collections of Giorgio Armani, Yohji Yamamoto and Comme des Garcons to town.
HOME & GARDEN
September 5, 2009 | David A. Keeps
A South Seas spa? A Hamptons hideaway? Neither. This inviting exterior is the deck of fashion minimalist James Perse's new store at the Malibu Lumber Yard. Perse, below, beloved by fans for the lived-in look of his faded T-shirts, conceived the beach-house ambience of the store, which was built by the architecture firm Marmol Radziner & Associates. It is the first of the designer's retail locations to sell his new furniture line. The pieces include the teak Colony armchair (from $2,200, including cushions)
HOME & GARDEN
October 18, 2007
Beloved for T-shirts and sportswear that fit and feel like favorites you've washed and worn a hundred times, James Perse has created a fresh, architectural beach-shack environment for his designs. His new Beverly Hills flagship reflects a clean-cut, surfer-dude persona and minimalist sensibility, with large-scale wave-rider photographs hung on white walls that rise to unfinished wooden beams. In a cluster in the front room, eight reproduction R.M. Schindler redwood chairs (available at the L.A.
NEWS
May 26, 2000
Tees and totes are a hot duo on L.A. streets these days. Whether they are fringed, beaded, printed, or rhinestoned, the season's colorful T-shirts and diminutive bags reflect the carefree abandon of L.A.'s dress-to-dazzle style and transcend fashion's time zones. The totes, with their petite proportions and glittery details, are both a daytime and a nighttime accessory. Same with embellished T-shirts that can complete an office-worthy suit or stand alone over a pair of sleek pants for dinner.
IMAGE
June 7, 2009
The concept of the new James Perse store in the Malibu Lumber Yard complex is "beach house," but to help bring in a crowd for its opening party, it employed two other magnetic summer-themed words: keg party. Of course, this being Malibu, and the store being more high-end than, say, your typical frat house, there were plenty of custom touches: The kegs were clad in cozies, and the store's graphics were everywhere from the beach chairs to the ice cream cart that served up dessert. The crowd?
HOME & GARDEN
September 5, 2009 | David A. Keeps
A South Seas spa? A Hamptons hideaway? Neither. This inviting exterior is the deck of fashion minimalist James Perse's new store at the Malibu Lumber Yard. Perse, below, beloved by fans for the lived-in look of his faded T-shirts, conceived the beach-house ambience of the store, which was built by the architecture firm Marmol Radziner & Associates. It is the first of the designer's retail locations to sell his new furniture line. The pieces include the teak Colony armchair (from $2,200, including cushions)
BUSINESS
December 6, 2011 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Clothing retailer James Perse has put a Hollywood Hills-area house up for sale at $3.75 million or for lease at $14,500 a month. The property has been rented out in recent years. The mid-century home, which is in the celebrity-populated "bird streets" area above the Sunset Strip, devotes its 2,300 square feet to open living space, one bedroom with a fireplace and oversized walk-in closet, and 1 3/4 bathrooms. The contemporary house sits behind gates on about a third of an acre with a swimming pool, spa and outdoor shower.
MAGAZINE
August 20, 2000 | TYLER REEB
On Justin Berfield, left: Stussy cotton shirt, $50, at Stussy, Los Angeles, and Ron Herman/Fred Segal Melrose, Los Angeles, over James Perse cotton T-shirt, $52, at Maxfield, Los Angeles, Bloomingdale's and American Rag Cie, Los Angeles, with Stussy cotton cargo pants, $56,at Stussy, Los Angeles, and Ron Herman/Fred Segal Melrose, Los Angeles. Royal Elastics tennis shoes for X LARGE.
IMAGE
June 21, 2009 | Adam Tschorn
It's hard to imagine a father and son who have shaped Los Angeles fashion as profoundly -- and as differently -- as Tommy Perse and his son James. In the 1970s, the elder Perse introduced the black-clad look to Southern California, through his influential West Hollywood store Maxfield. In the '80s, Tommy Perse was the first to bring the collections of Giorgio Armani, Yohji Yamamoto and Comme des Garcons to town.
IMAGE
June 7, 2009
The concept of the new James Perse store in the Malibu Lumber Yard complex is "beach house," but to help bring in a crowd for its opening party, it employed two other magnetic summer-themed words: keg party. Of course, this being Malibu, and the store being more high-end than, say, your typical frat house, there were plenty of custom touches: The kegs were clad in cozies, and the store's graphics were everywhere from the beach chairs to the ice cream cart that served up dessert. The crowd?
HOME & GARDEN
October 18, 2007
Beloved for T-shirts and sportswear that fit and feel like favorites you've washed and worn a hundred times, James Perse has created a fresh, architectural beach-shack environment for his designs. His new Beverly Hills flagship reflects a clean-cut, surfer-dude persona and minimalist sensibility, with large-scale wave-rider photographs hung on white walls that rise to unfinished wooden beams. In a cluster in the front room, eight reproduction R.M. Schindler redwood chairs (available at the L.A.
MAGAZINE
September 8, 2002 | LAURIE PIKE
Like father, like son? Not when it comes to James Perse, whose father, Tommy, owns L.A.'s out-there style emporium Maxfield. Perse pere may be known as the man who brought Yohji Yamamoto to L.A., but his designer son prefers plain old T-shirts. "It took years 'til my dad would wear my stuff," says 30-year-old James. "But now, underneath his wild get-ups, he wears my T-shirts."
NEWS
May 26, 2000
Tees and totes are a hot duo on L.A. streets these days. Whether they are fringed, beaded, printed, or rhinestoned, the season's colorful T-shirts and diminutive bags reflect the carefree abandon of L.A.'s dress-to-dazzle style and transcend fashion's time zones. The totes, with their petite proportions and glittery details, are both a daytime and a nighttime accessory. Same with embellished T-shirts that can complete an office-worthy suit or stand alone over a pair of sleek pants for dinner.
NEWS
October 30, 2012 | By Susan Denley
Kylie Minogue plans to release a book commemorating fashion throughout her 25-year career, including contributions from designers who have worked with her (such as John Galliano, Jean Paul Gaultier and Stella McCartney). "Kylie/Fashion" is being published in the U.K. in November and the U.S. in April. [Vogue UK] Levi Johnston, Bristol Palin's ex-boyfriend and father of their son Tripp, wed Sunny Oglesby, mother of their daughter Breeze Berretta -- yes, she's named for a gun manufacturer -- in Wasilla, Alaska, on Sunday.
IMAGE
August 22, 2010 | By Max Padilla, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Standard is getting into the buy-local movement with the opening of the revamped Shop at the Standard, which will carry a mix of Los Angeles-made and locally based brands. The Shop, which shares a space with Rudy's Barbershop at the downtown hotel, is celebrating its grand reopening Tuesday from 6 to 8 p.m. (to attend, RSVP to tiana@nadinejohnson.com ). At the event, L.A.-based accessory designer Clare Vivier will unveil her limited-edition collection of evening clutches co-branded with the Shop.
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