Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJames Ponsoldt
IN THE NEWS

James Ponsoldt

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Making two indie films about the drinking problems of young people might not immediately seem to put one in line for adapting a beloved Broadway musical, but such are the unpredictable ways of Hollywood. The Weinstein Co. said Tuesday that James Ponsoldt, director of the recent "Smashed" and "The Spectacular Now," would be writing a screen adaptation of the musical "Pippin. " "Smashed," which Ponsoldt wrote and directed, starred Mary Elizabeth Winstead and Aaron Paul as a young couple grappling with alcoholism.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2013 | By Amy Kaufman
Is Shailene Woodley the new Jennifer Lawrence? That's the increasingly relevant question as Woodley has made the media rounds this past month, talking up her new indie romance "The Spectacular Now" and next year's "Divergent. " Certainly, there are a handful of obvious parallels: Each actress quickly climbed to the top of the Young Hollywood ranks with a hot award-season title (Lawrence with "Winter's Bone" and Woodley with "The Descendants"). They both now star in film adaptations of bestselling YA books - Lawrence with "The Hunger Games" and Woodley in the equally dystopian "Divergent.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Hot off the success of "The Bling Ring" and "Spring Breakers," the new distribution company A24 will again take a run at the crossover of smart youth and art house pictures with the August release of "The Spectacular Now," starring Shailene Woodley and Miles Teller. The first poster and trailer for the film, which premiered earlier this year at the Sundance Film Festival and plays again Friday as part of the Los Angeles Film Festival, were just released. Based on the novel by Tim Tharp, the film features Teller as a small-town high-schooler on the cusp of adulthood and Woodley as the girl who helps push him in that direction.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
Shailene Woodley and Miles Teller have a lot in common. Both are up-and-coming actors in Hollywood, both are interested in challenging, offbeat roles, and both of them bombed their first auditions for the parts they coveted in the film adaptation of Tim Tharp's bestselling novel "The Spectacular Now. " But the chance to play authentic versions of teenagers, ones grappling with the challenges of pending adulthood without strong support systems easing...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2013 | By Amy Kaufman
Is Shailene Woodley the new Jennifer Lawrence? That's the increasingly relevant question as Woodley has made the media rounds this past month, talking up her new indie romance "The Spectacular Now" and next year's "Divergent. " Certainly, there are a handful of obvious parallels: Each actress quickly climbed to the top of the Young Hollywood ranks with a hot award-season title (Lawrence with "Winter's Bone" and Woodley with "The Descendants"). They both now star in film adaptations of bestselling YA books - Lawrence with "The Hunger Games" and Woodley in the equally dystopian "Divergent.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2013 | By Noel Murray
Wuthering Heights Available on VOD beginning March 12 Having dissected class conflict in the U.K. in her acclaimed films "Red Road" and "Fish Tank," director Andrea Arnold now jumps back 200 years to provide a similar take on Emily Brontë's classic. Arnold's "Wuthering Heights" is grubby and elemental, telling the story of a doomed romance between a Yorkshire lady and her adopted brother - depicted as black in the movie, as opposed to Romany in the novel. As filtered through Arnold's sensibility, Brontë's tale is just a rough thread on which to hang impressionistic, dialogue-free scenes of muddy farm-folk, in conflict over what they consider to be their property.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2013 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
- Sometimes it seems no film festival is complete without an "it" girl - a Parker Posey, Zooey Deschanel, Greta Gerwig, Brit Marling or Elizabeth Olsen to encapsulate the current mood. This year's South by Southwest, which opened Friday, may already have one: Brie Larson. The 23-year-old with a wise kid-sister vibe and smartly cute style sense appears in three features at the festival: "Short Term 12," which premieres Sunday and marks her first leading role, as well as "The Spectacular Now" and "Don Jon's Addiction" (both of which first screened at Sundance)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
There have been plenty of films over the years that grapple with alcoholism, a wide swath that includes "The Lost Weekend" and "Leaving Las Vegas," "The Shining" and "Arthur. " Few have attempted to capture the highs and lows in quite the same naturalistic way as "Smashed. " The movie, which debuts Friday, is a breakout role for 27-year-old Mary Elizabeth Winstead, who has played supporting characters in such films as "Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter" and "Scott Pilgrim vs. the World.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
Shailene Woodley and Miles Teller have a lot in common. Both are up-and-coming actors in Hollywood, both are interested in challenging, offbeat roles, and both of them bombed their first auditions for the parts they coveted in the film adaptation of Tim Tharp's bestselling novel "The Spectacular Now. " But the chance to play authentic versions of teenagers, ones grappling with the challenges of pending adulthood without strong support systems easing...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2012 | By Sheri Linden
The addiction drama "Smashed" is a variation on "Days of Wine and Roses" that's both down and dirty and boisterously energetic. It's also one of those showily unassuming movies, using a working-class setting (Highland Park, an unfamiliar and welcome screen location) and busy handheld camerawork to insist on its authenticity. At its center is a young Angeleno couple, played by Mary Elizabeth Winstead and Aaron Paul, who are united in drinking and divided by her recovery. "Smashed" opens strong, smack in the middle of a hangover, and in a couple of headlong sequences, Winstead's Kate hits bottom.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
In the opening moments of "The Spectacular Now," 17-year-old Sutter is trying to bluff his way through the infamous personal essay on a college application. He is fortified by drink as he tries out charm, wit, cynicism and insult - everything but honesty. It's a perfect start for this culturally astute drama, spiked with enough comedy to make it splendidly intoxicating to watch. In movies, coming-of-age has become convenient shorthand for the crush of stories about the high school crowd - sci-fi, drama, comedy, horror, take your pick.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Hot off the success of "The Bling Ring" and "Spring Breakers," the new distribution company A24 will again take a run at the crossover of smart youth and art house pictures with the August release of "The Spectacular Now," starring Shailene Woodley and Miles Teller. The first poster and trailer for the film, which premiered earlier this year at the Sundance Film Festival and plays again Friday as part of the Los Angeles Film Festival, were just released. Based on the novel by Tim Tharp, the film features Teller as a small-town high-schooler on the cusp of adulthood and Woodley as the girl who helps push him in that direction.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Making two indie films about the drinking problems of young people might not immediately seem to put one in line for adapting a beloved Broadway musical, but such are the unpredictable ways of Hollywood. The Weinstein Co. said Tuesday that James Ponsoldt, director of the recent "Smashed" and "The Spectacular Now," would be writing a screen adaptation of the musical "Pippin. " "Smashed," which Ponsoldt wrote and directed, starred Mary Elizabeth Winstead and Aaron Paul as a young couple grappling with alcoholism.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2013 | By Noel Murray
Wuthering Heights Available on VOD beginning March 12 Having dissected class conflict in the U.K. in her acclaimed films "Red Road" and "Fish Tank," director Andrea Arnold now jumps back 200 years to provide a similar take on Emily Brontë's classic. Arnold's "Wuthering Heights" is grubby and elemental, telling the story of a doomed romance between a Yorkshire lady and her adopted brother - depicted as black in the movie, as opposed to Romany in the novel. As filtered through Arnold's sensibility, Brontë's tale is just a rough thread on which to hang impressionistic, dialogue-free scenes of muddy farm-folk, in conflict over what they consider to be their property.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2013 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
- Sometimes it seems no film festival is complete without an "it" girl - a Parker Posey, Zooey Deschanel, Greta Gerwig, Brit Marling or Elizabeth Olsen to encapsulate the current mood. This year's South by Southwest, which opened Friday, may already have one: Brie Larson. The 23-year-old with a wise kid-sister vibe and smartly cute style sense appears in three features at the festival: "Short Term 12," which premieres Sunday and marks her first leading role, as well as "The Spectacular Now" and "Don Jon's Addiction" (both of which first screened at Sundance)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2012 | By Sheri Linden
The addiction drama "Smashed" is a variation on "Days of Wine and Roses" that's both down and dirty and boisterously energetic. It's also one of those showily unassuming movies, using a working-class setting (Highland Park, an unfamiliar and welcome screen location) and busy handheld camerawork to insist on its authenticity. At its center is a young Angeleno couple, played by Mary Elizabeth Winstead and Aaron Paul, who are united in drinking and divided by her recovery. "Smashed" opens strong, smack in the middle of a hangover, and in a couple of headlong sequences, Winstead's Kate hits bottom.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
In the opening moments of "The Spectacular Now," 17-year-old Sutter is trying to bluff his way through the infamous personal essay on a college application. He is fortified by drink as he tries out charm, wit, cynicism and insult - everything but honesty. It's a perfect start for this culturally astute drama, spiked with enough comedy to make it splendidly intoxicating to watch. In movies, coming-of-age has become convenient shorthand for the crush of stories about the high school crowd - sci-fi, drama, comedy, horror, take your pick.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
It may be only the start of summer, but the jockeying for position in Hollywood's end-of-year awards derby is already well under way. The Weinstein Co. has moved the release dates of two of its hopefuls. "August: Osage County" is being pushed back to Christmas Day from its previous date of Nov. 7, while "Grace of Monaco," starring Nicole Kidman as actress-turned-royalty Grace Kelly, will come forward from Dec. 27 to Nov. 27. Directed by John Wells, "August" is adapted by Tracey Letts from his own play and features a heavyweight, hardware-hungry cast of Meryl Streep, Julia Roberts, Chris Cooper and Benedict Cumberbatch.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
There have been plenty of films over the years that grapple with alcoholism, a wide swath that includes "The Lost Weekend" and "Leaving Las Vegas," "The Shining" and "Arthur. " Few have attempted to capture the highs and lows in quite the same naturalistic way as "Smashed. " The movie, which debuts Friday, is a breakout role for 27-year-old Mary Elizabeth Winstead, who has played supporting characters in such films as "Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter" and "Scott Pilgrim vs. the World.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|