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James Prideaux

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1992 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
For James Prideaux, Sunday night signals a symbolic write of passage. The time when great actresses walked the Earth seems to be ending as Katharine Hepburn plays what some have said is her final role in the CBS Sunday night movie "The Man Upstairs," written and co-produced by Prideaux. Here we have another of those generational things, one in which the Hepburn leading ladies of this world dissolve and in their place . . . the emergence of the Madonna Era. Perhaps.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2003
The poor showing of "Gigli" ("A 'Wedding' Banquet While 'Gigli' Starves," by R. Kinsey Lowe, Aug. 4) points out once again the importance of a title. It was doomed from the start. Although we've been told by the producers that it rhymes with "really," how could it? "Geally?" Come, now! Can you imagine anyone saying, "Hey, let's go see 'Geally!' "? James Prideaux Los Angeles If Johnny Cochran were a film reviewer, he might say this about "Gigli": "If you can't pronounce it, you must denounce it."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1999
Re "Photos Renew Bond Between Holocaust Survivors, Liberators," Sept. 15: After reading the story of Stanley Tysch being liberated from a Nazi concentration camp by GI Vernon Tott, I found there were tears streaming down my cheeks. In a world peopled by too many devils, it is good to be reminded that there are also angels. JAMES PRIDEAUX Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2002
Sean Mitchell's grudging and unpleasant review of "Oscar and Felix" had nothing to do with what was on the stage ("It's Still Oddly Familiar," June 21). Neil Simon's delicious update, the brilliant cast and the superb direction all combined to give us more laughs than I have ever heard from an audience. JAMES PRIDEAUX Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2002
Sean Mitchell's grudging and unpleasant review of "Oscar and Felix" had nothing to do with what was on the stage ("It's Still Oddly Familiar," June 21). Neil Simon's delicious update, the brilliant cast and the superb direction all combined to give us more laughs than I have ever heard from an audience. JAMES PRIDEAUX Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1990
Mr. Turan says Oscar Wilde wrote "The Importance of Being Ernest." Wilde's masterpiece is "The Importance of Being Earnest." Perhaps Mr. Turan should "stretch" himself in the field of the arts before sitting down to carp about others. JAMES PRIDEAUX Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1997
Re "Song's Anti-Gay Stance Spurs Protests, Boycotts," Oct. 25: It's fascinating to me that Debbie and Angie Winans should use their Christian religion as a means of spreading hate, especially when so many of us were taught that God is love. JAMES PRIDEAUX Los Angeles God bless Angie and Debbie Winans. They are truly right on! C.W. JENNER Los Alamitos
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1997
Princess Margaret's complaint, as reported by Liz Smith Dec. 3, that the flowers left in memory of Princess Diana "completely ruined the lawns" at Kensington Place and the votive candles "ruined the tree barks," is yet another example of the Germanic Windsors'--formerly the Battenbergs'--coldness. And by declaring that "it was mainly Americans who did all that anyway," she shows once again how removed are the royal family from the hearts of the British people. Back to Berlin, I say!
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2003
The poor showing of "Gigli" ("A 'Wedding' Banquet While 'Gigli' Starves," by R. Kinsey Lowe, Aug. 4) points out once again the importance of a title. It was doomed from the start. Although we've been told by the producers that it rhymes with "really," how could it? "Geally?" Come, now! Can you imagine anyone saying, "Hey, let's go see 'Geally!' "? James Prideaux Los Angeles If Johnny Cochran were a film reviewer, he might say this about "Gigli": "If you can't pronounce it, you must denounce it."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1997
How interesting are the remarks of Bruce Willis at the recent Cannes Film Festival ("Generation Gap Alert," May 16)! He states that "the written word is going the way of the dinosaur." Well, obviously Willis doesn't read, nor do his friends. And I know the world is peopled with morons--with money--who will go to see his latest cartoon. However, I suspect that the world will remember Jane Austen long after Willis is gone and forgotten. I would suggest, too, that without the written word, producers would have nothing to produce and directors would have nothing to direct.
OPINION
March 31, 2002
Re "TV Legend 'Uncle Miltie' Dies at 93," March 28: Of the times I spent with Milton Berle, which were many I'm happy to say, I never came away without having learned more about show business and as a better professional. Thank you, Miltie. James Prideaux Los Angeles I did not know Milton Berle, but I regret his passing. I'm sure most people don't realize the impact his show had in the early years of television. I remember as a family event gathering around the 10-inch black-and-white Philco to watch "Uncle Miltie."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2000
I am shocked that nowhere on Steve Metcalf's list of ignored Kennedy Center Honors recipients is perhaps America's greatest actress, Miss Julie Harris ("Underachieving 'Honors' Needs to Rethink Approach," Dec. 29). For decades, Harris has given us the finest in the art of acting on both stage and screen. She is a true cultural icon, which is what the Kennedy Center honorees are meant to be and frequently aren't. I am afraid they are a cheap gimmick and not to be taken seriously. JAMES PRIDEAUX Los Angeles Harris won a Tony Award in 1973 for her starring role in Prideaux's "The Last of Mrs. Lincoln."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1999
Re "Photos Renew Bond Between Holocaust Survivors, Liberators," Sept. 15: After reading the story of Stanley Tysch being liberated from a Nazi concentration camp by GI Vernon Tott, I found there were tears streaming down my cheeks. In a world peopled by too many devils, it is good to be reminded that there are also angels. JAMES PRIDEAUX Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1997
Princess Margaret's complaint, as reported by Liz Smith Dec. 3, that the flowers left in memory of Princess Diana "completely ruined the lawns" at Kensington Place and the votive candles "ruined the tree barks," is yet another example of the Germanic Windsors'--formerly the Battenbergs'--coldness. And by declaring that "it was mainly Americans who did all that anyway," she shows once again how removed are the royal family from the hearts of the British people. Back to Berlin, I say!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1997
Re "Song's Anti-Gay Stance Spurs Protests, Boycotts," Oct. 25: It's fascinating to me that Debbie and Angie Winans should use their Christian religion as a means of spreading hate, especially when so many of us were taught that God is love. JAMES PRIDEAUX Los Angeles God bless Angie and Debbie Winans. They are truly right on! C.W. JENNER Los Alamitos
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1997
How interesting are the remarks of Bruce Willis at the recent Cannes Film Festival ("Generation Gap Alert," May 16)! He states that "the written word is going the way of the dinosaur." Well, obviously Willis doesn't read, nor do his friends. And I know the world is peopled with morons--with money--who will go to see his latest cartoon. However, I suspect that the world will remember Jane Austen long after Willis is gone and forgotten. I would suggest, too, that without the written word, producers would have nothing to produce and directors would have nothing to direct.
OPINION
March 31, 2002
Re "TV Legend 'Uncle Miltie' Dies at 93," March 28: Of the times I spent with Milton Berle, which were many I'm happy to say, I never came away without having learned more about show business and as a better professional. Thank you, Miltie. James Prideaux Los Angeles I did not know Milton Berle, but I regret his passing. I'm sure most people don't realize the impact his show had in the early years of television. I remember as a family event gathering around the 10-inch black-and-white Philco to watch "Uncle Miltie."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2000
I am shocked that nowhere on Steve Metcalf's list of ignored Kennedy Center Honors recipients is perhaps America's greatest actress, Miss Julie Harris ("Underachieving 'Honors' Needs to Rethink Approach," Dec. 29). For decades, Harris has given us the finest in the art of acting on both stage and screen. She is a true cultural icon, which is what the Kennedy Center honorees are meant to be and frequently aren't. I am afraid they are a cheap gimmick and not to be taken seriously. JAMES PRIDEAUX Los Angeles Harris won a Tony Award in 1973 for her starring role in Prideaux's "The Last of Mrs. Lincoln."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1992 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
For James Prideaux, Sunday night signals a symbolic write of passage. The time when great actresses walked the Earth seems to be ending as Katharine Hepburn plays what some have said is her final role in the CBS Sunday night movie "The Man Upstairs," written and co-produced by Prideaux. Here we have another of those generational things, one in which the Hepburn leading ladies of this world dissolve and in their place . . . the emergence of the Madonna Era. Perhaps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1992
As the author of the play, "Lyndon," which Jack Klugman originated and Laurence Luckinbill has played so brilliantly on television and the stage, I was deeply moved by Joanne Harrison's affectionate look at L.B.J.'s Neighborhood Youth Corps and the purpose it gave to her life. The Vietnam War did him in, but Lyndon Johnson meant it when he said, "I wanted to be the President who educated young children, who helped to feed the hungry, who helped the poor to find their own way and who protected the right of every citizen to vote in every election."
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