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James Q Wilson

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
James Q. Wilson, a social scientist who helped launch a revolution in law enforcement as the co-inventor of the "broken windows" theory — the idea that eradicating graffiti, public drunkenness and other signposts of community decay was crucial to making neighborhoods safer — died Friday in Boston. He was 80. The cause was complications of leukemia, according to his son, Matthew Wilson. Often called the "father of community policing," Wilson, who taught for many years at UCLA and Pepperdine University, was a widely admired public intellectual who wrote more than two dozen books on American government, criminal justice and moral issues.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
March 9, 2012
Kennedy: A March 7 Op-Ed article about Andrew Breitbart and James Q. Wilson said that Sen. Edward M. Kennedy died in 2007. He died in 2009.
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NEWS
November 27, 1996 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He is the man behind a revolution in American policing. He is one of the country's most influential political philosophers. His work on morals has suggested a new view of the human conscience and society. He is polite and deferential, modest and intellectually ravenous. Above all, he is sensible, his work grounded in real life even as it plumbs the reaches of genetics, morality, criminality and society. He is James Q.
OPINION
March 6, 2012 | JIM NEWTON
Last week, the nation lost an elegant inquisitor and a nasty pugilist. Both were conservatives and natives of Southern California, and they agreed about many matters of policy. But James Q. Wilson delved deeply on matters of significance and left a vast and consequential legacy. Andrew Breitbart raked for muck and accelerated the nation's unhappy race to replace civility with furor. They represented two distinct veins of our national discourse, and of the tensions within modern conservatism.
OPINION
March 9, 2012
Kennedy: A March 7 Op-Ed article about Andrew Breitbart and James Q. Wilson said that Sen. Edward M. Kennedy died in 2007. He died in 2009.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1985
Not long ago it was considered socially and intellectually reprehensible to suggest that people's traits, skills and behavior were genetically influenced, much less determined. The nature-vs.-nurture debate was all on the side of nurture. In particular, the causes of crime were believed to be poverty, the criminal-justice system, racism and the like. Now comes a new book from a distinguished criminologist and a distinguished psychologist who claim that there is more to it than that.
NEWS
April 1, 1991 | GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor Tom Bradley today will appoint former Deputy Secretary of State Warren M. Christopher chairman of a seven-member citizens' commission that will launch an unprecedented investigation of the Police Department in the wake of the Rodney G. King beating, it was learned Sunday. In addition, recently retired assistant police chief Jesse A. Brewer and noted criminologist James Q. Wilson will be named senior advisers to the citizens' panel.
NEWS
July 30, 1991 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
For generations, rich families have turned to boarding schools to straighten out their errant offspring. Could that upper-crust model be a solution to the problems of crime, disorder and poverty afflicting the inner-city poor? That is the provocative contention of James Q. Wilson, a professor at the UCLA Graduate School of Management and a prolific author on crime, social policy and urban problems for the last three decades.
OPINION
March 6, 2012 | JIM NEWTON
Last week, the nation lost an elegant inquisitor and a nasty pugilist. Both were conservatives and natives of Southern California, and they agreed about many matters of policy. But James Q. Wilson delved deeply on matters of significance and left a vast and consequential legacy. Andrew Breitbart raked for muck and accelerated the nation's unhappy race to replace civility with furor. They represented two distinct veins of our national discourse, and of the tensions within modern conservatism.
NEWS
August 2, 1993 | ALEX RAKSIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Enlightenment has always been a mixed bag. The tools it gave us, such as the scientific method, led not just to a cure for polio but to Hiroshima; the individuality it fostered led not just to self-realization and social mobility but to loneliness and loss of community. What had promised to be empowering and inspiring left T. S. Eliot writing of "hollow men" living in a "wasteland" from which, as Sartre complained, there seemed "no exit."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
James Q. Wilson, a social scientist who helped launch a revolution in law enforcement as the co-inventor of the "broken windows" theory — the idea that eradicating graffiti, public drunkenness and other signposts of community decay was crucial to making neighborhoods safer — died Friday in Boston. He was 80. The cause was complications of leukemia, according to his son, Matthew Wilson. Often called the "father of community policing," Wilson, who taught for many years at UCLA and Pepperdine University, was a widely admired public intellectual who wrote more than two dozen books on American government, criminal justice and moral issues.
OPINION
June 3, 2007 | Jim Newton, JIM NEWTON is Editorial Page editor of The Times.
JAMES Q. WILSON left Southern California as a young man and returned to it as an accomplished one, but he is not exactly a product of it nor is he a participant in its civic life by most conventional definitions. He holds no local position, serves no local board, aspires to no local office.
NEWS
November 27, 1996 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He is the man behind a revolution in American policing. He is one of the country's most influential political philosophers. His work on morals has suggested a new view of the human conscience and society. He is polite and deferential, modest and intellectually ravenous. Above all, he is sensible, his work grounded in real life even as it plumbs the reaches of genetics, morality, criminality and society. He is James Q.
NEWS
August 2, 1993 | ALEX RAKSIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Enlightenment has always been a mixed bag. The tools it gave us, such as the scientific method, led not just to a cure for polio but to Hiroshima; the individuality it fostered led not just to self-realization and social mobility but to loneliness and loss of community. What had promised to be empowering and inspiring left T. S. Eliot writing of "hollow men" living in a "wasteland" from which, as Sartre complained, there seemed "no exit."
NEWS
July 30, 1991 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
For generations, rich families have turned to boarding schools to straighten out their errant offspring. Could that upper-crust model be a solution to the problems of crime, disorder and poverty afflicting the inner-city poor? That is the provocative contention of James Q. Wilson, a professor at the UCLA Graduate School of Management and a prolific author on crime, social policy and urban problems for the last three decades.
OPINION
June 3, 2007 | Jim Newton, JIM NEWTON is Editorial Page editor of The Times.
JAMES Q. WILSON left Southern California as a young man and returned to it as an accomplished one, but he is not exactly a product of it nor is he a participant in its civic life by most conventional definitions. He holds no local position, serves no local board, aspires to no local office.
NEWS
April 1, 1991 | GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor Tom Bradley today will appoint former Deputy Secretary of State Warren M. Christopher chairman of a seven-member citizens' commission that will launch an unprecedented investigation of the Police Department in the wake of the Rodney G. King beating, it was learned Sunday. In addition, recently retired assistant police chief Jesse A. Brewer and noted criminologist James Q. Wilson will be named senior advisers to the citizens' panel.
BOOKS
April 29, 1990 | Aaron Wildavsky, Wildavsky is the co-author of "Implementation: How Great Expectations in Washington Are Dashed in Oakland" (University of California Press).
"Bureaucracy" immediately takes its place as the indispensable one-volume guide to American national administration for citizen and foreigner alike. When we wish to know why the bureaucracy behaves as it does, or are asked where a curious person might find this out, now we know what to recommend.
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