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James R Carey

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NEWS
September 20, 1991 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No new Medflies have been found in nearly a year since the largest infestation in Southern California's history, but a UC Davis entomologist says it is only a matter of time before the crop-destroying pests return in full force. James R. Carey, writing in today's issue of Science magazine, said an analysis of Mediterranean fruit fly trappings since 1975 indicates that the insect has established itself in parts of Southern California and is spreading through the region.
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NEWS
September 20, 1991 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No new Medflies have been found in nearly a year since the largest infestation in Southern California's history, but a UC Davis entomologist says it is only a matter of time before the crop-destroying pests return in full force. James R. Carey, writing in today's issue of Science magazine, said an analysis of Mediterranean fruit fly trappings since 1975 indicates that the insect has established itself in parts of Southern California and is spreading through the region.
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NEWS
March 18, 1990 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James R. Carey, the entomologist who contends that the Mediterranean fruit fly has been entrenched in Southern California since the mid-1970s, says his research also indicates the pest has resided in Northern California for nearly as long.
NEWS
March 18, 1990 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James R. Carey, the entomologist who contends that the Mediterranean fruit fly has been entrenched in Southern California since the mid-1970s, says his research also indicates the pest has resided in Northern California for nearly as long.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1990
Sometimes a seemingly intractable problem becomes less awesome if you step back and take a new look at it. That's why it's high time for state officials clinging to the current helicopter-bombardment strategy of eradicating the Medfly to rethink assumptions about the pest. James R.
NEWS
July 11, 1990 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Agricultural officials reported today that another Mediterranean fruit fly has been trapped in Rosemead, raising the possibility that a new round of pesticide spraying will be needed--just two months after the pest supposedly was eradicated from the city. The discovery was made in the most heavily sprayed sector of Southern California's year-old infestation, and it reinforced fears that the state's aggressive campaign of aerial malathion spraying might not be working.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1990
Ah, summertime--peaches ripen until fruit tree branches sag with the weight of nature's candy. It's a small but certain pleasure. But there's an unpleasant seasonal inevitability that occurs in Southern California now: the outbreak of more Mediterranean fruit flies, more pesticide spraying and more self-delusion from agriculture officials. Medfly outbreaks have become fairly predictable. Discoveries of the fly follow a warm-weather pattern.
NEWS
November 22, 1990 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just two weeks after the state jubilantly declared the eradication of the Mediterranean fruit fly in Southern California, agriculture officials announced Wednesday the discovery of two more of the crop-destroying pests--this time in San Bernardino County. The two unmated female Medflies were found within three miles of each other in Upland and Rancho Cucamonga. One of the trapped flies was less than a mile from where the first Medfly ever found in the county was trapped last September.
NEWS
August 2, 1990 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The current Medfly infestation in Southern California probably originated with a small West Los Angeles outbreak that agriculture officials failed to eradicate in 1988, a scientific panel reported Wednesday. The group of eight scientists, convened by the University of California to investigate Southern California's infestation, said the Medfly boom this year even may be linked to a single fly found in the same West Los Angeles neighborhood in 1987.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1990 | CHARISSE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time, the California Department of Food and Agriculture is extending an open invitation to the public for research proposals on how to fight the Mediterranean and Mexican fruit flies without using malathion, it was announced Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1990 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the eve of the most critical breeding period for the Mediterranean fruit fly, top agricultural officials declared Thursday that the worst of the yearlong infestation is over and complete victory may come by the end of next month. "We're closing in and wringing the last drops out of the sponge. If we don't find any more flies, we're out of this in September," Henry J. Voss, director of the state Department of Food and Agriculture, said in a confident assessment of the eradication campaign.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1990 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Mediterranean fruit fly has been trapped just south of Hancock Park, an abrupt return to the heart of Los Angeles by an infestation that began near downtown but spread mainly through the suburbs of the San Fernando and San Gabriel valleys. The discovery, made last Thursday but announced on Tuesday, heightened suspicions among some scientists involved in the eradication campaign that the infestation may be far broader than previously thought.
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