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James R Hunter

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1990
James R. Hunter, former coordinator for development of the California Mart, this week was elected president and chief executive officer of the Central City Assn. of Los Angeles--an organization of business leaders who promote downtown development. A graduate of Yale University, Hunter taught urban planning for eight years and was vice president of the New York State Development Corp. before coming to California in 1982.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1990
James R. Hunter, former coordinator for development of the California Mart, this week was elected president and chief executive officer of the Central City Assn. of Los Angeles--an organization of business leaders who promote downtown development. A graduate of Yale University, Hunter taught urban planning for eight years and was vice president of the New York State Development Corp. before coming to California in 1982.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 1991
A movement to suspend operations at the financially strapped Los Angeles Theatre Center fizzled at an LATC board meeting Thursday. "LATC is an ongoing proposition. We're here to stay," said James R. Hunter, one of four board members who had advocated suspending operations in a memo to the other board members, distributed Monday. "Once we had learned the facts, we felt the resolution (to close the company) was not appropriate," so the resolution was not introduced, Hunter said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1990 | CHARISSE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles City Council voted Tuesday to increase taxes on local businesses by 2.5%, putting in place the last piece of a $59-million tax package that will affect everyone from suburban commuters to downtown merchants. The council approved, 12 to 1, a 10% gross-receipts tax on businesses that is expected to raise $27 million annually for the city, which is facing its worst financial crisis in years, according to officials. The tax will replace the 7.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1991 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that promises to thrust Los Angeles into a rancorous national debate, a city councilman has proposed that the city vigorously regulate the use of workplace video display terminals to protect employees from VDT-related injury and illness. Following the lead of San Francisco, Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky proposed "the strongest ordinance possible" to protect municipal and private industry computer users from real and suspected dangers of using the ubiquitous computer terminals.
NEWS
April 21, 1990 | JANE FRITSCH and TRACY WOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Saying the city must walk a "financial tightrope," Mayor Tom Bradley on Friday unveiled a 1990-91 budget that includes a first-ever parking tax aimed at people who drive to work, a 10% business tax increase and a doubling of fees paid for sanitation trucks. The top priorities in the proposed $3.68-billion budget are the Police Department, which would be allotted 400 new officers, and the Fire Department, which would receive 115 additional emergency medical service positions.
NEWS
September 12, 1992 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's the no-nonsense Latina entrepreneur, in a white hair net and smock amid steel tubs of ground chorizo in the Vernon sausage factory she helped rescue from bankruptcy. There's the tinkerer's daughter who loves the delicacy of Japanese art but who spends her days steeped in the grunge of the tiny Hawthorne auto parts rebuilding shop she inherited from her father.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI
It is one minute before 10 on a Saturday night not long ago. The 500 block of South Spring Street in downtown Los Angeles is quiet, almost deserted--even over by the Alexandria Hotel, once a notorious drug haven--in front of the Los Angeles Theatre Center.
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