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James R Lilley

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NEWS
January 9, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. Ambassador to China James R. Lilley, 62, a career intelligence official and a longtime associate of President Bush, is planning to step down soon from his embassy post and return to the United States, sources say. Administration officials refused to comment on Lilley's plans or a possible successor. The leading candidate is said to be J. Stapleton Roy, who was once second-in-command of the embassy in Beijing.
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NEWS
October 1, 1991 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Ambassador to China James R. Lilley had only a few months outside the Bush Administration to say what he really thought, and he grabbed the opportunity. Lilley stepped down as President Bush's envoy to Beijing in May and became, at least briefly, a private citizen. Two months later, in a speech at Penn State University, he issued a blistering denunciation of the Chinese leadership with whom he had been doing business for the previous two years.
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OPINION
June 16, 1991
It should not be surprising to find that Fang Lizhi, an ex-Communist, spoke against President Bush's China policy ("Exiled Dissident Fang Denounces Bush's China Policy," Part A, May 30). His testimony to a congressional panel is based upon his personal grievance against the Chinese government, disregard for the welfare of the Chinese people and the wishes of Chinese Americans. Loss of the most-favored-nation trade status will hurt the Chinese people the most and is not in the best interest of the United States in the long term.
OPINION
June 16, 1991
It should not be surprising to find that Fang Lizhi, an ex-Communist, spoke against President Bush's China policy ("Exiled Dissident Fang Denounces Bush's China Policy," Part A, May 30). His testimony to a congressional panel is based upon his personal grievance against the Chinese government, disregard for the welfare of the Chinese people and the wishes of Chinese Americans. Loss of the most-favored-nation trade status will hurt the Chinese people the most and is not in the best interest of the United States in the long term.
NEWS
February 2, 1989 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
President Bush, filling a key overseas post, has decided to nominate a former CIA officer as ambassador to China, sources said Wednesday. The choice is James R. Lilley, a career intelligence officer who served as CIA station chief in China when Bush headed the U.S. liaison office there in 1974-75.
NEWS
October 1, 1991 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Ambassador to China James R. Lilley had only a few months outside the Bush Administration to say what he really thought, and he grabbed the opportunity. Lilley stepped down as President Bush's envoy to Beijing in May and became, at least briefly, a private citizen. Two months later, in a speech at Penn State University, he issued a blistering denunciation of the Chinese leadership with whom he had been doing business for the previous two years.
NEWS
November 17, 1988 | JACK NELSON and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
A campaign to dump William H. Webster as CIA director has been launched by veterans of the intelligence community who contend that he has been too cautious about launching clandestine operations and too vigorous in disciplining agency personnel linked to the Iran-Contra scandal. A key participant in the drive, according to knowledgeable sources, is Donald P. Gregg, national security adviser to President-elect George Bush, who served as a link between Bush's office and Oliver L.
NEWS
June 9, 1989 | United Press International
The State Department confirmed the presence of a prominent Chinese dissident in the U.S. Embassy in Beijing, evidently against the wishes of U.S. Ambassador James R. Lilley, CBS News reported Thursday. Lilley, interviewed in Beijing by CBS, refused to comment on whether Fang Lizhi, an astrophysicist who has been dubbed the "Andrei Sakharov of China," is staying at the Embassy. Fang, 53, was expelled from the Communist Party in 1987. Lilley became visibly angry when asked about State Department reports that Fang had taken refuge at the embassy to avoid falling victim to the Communist government's crackdown on the pro-democracy movement.
NEWS
April 8, 1990 | From Associated Press
A Chinese rocket lifted a U.S.-made telecommunications satellite into space Saturday, marking the nation's debut in the international satellite-launching business. Applause broke out in the launch control room as the flaming tail of the Long March 3 rocket disappeared into the nighttime skies over the Xichang Satellite Center in southwest China's Sichuan province. Attending the launch were about 400 invited guests from around the world, including many from satellite maker Hughes Aircraft Co.
NEWS
June 16, 1989 | From Reuters
The State Department, responding to complaints that it was slow to react to the violence in China, said Thursday that U.S. Embassy staff members in Beijing did "their damnedest" to evacuate Americans. "The perception is certainly there that the U.S. Embassy in China did not anticipate and, therefore, was not prepared to deal adequately with this crisis in China. We should have known!" California Rep. Mervyn M. Dymally (D-Compton), chairman of a House Foreign Affairs subcommittee, said at a hearing.
NEWS
January 9, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. Ambassador to China James R. Lilley, 62, a career intelligence official and a longtime associate of President Bush, is planning to step down soon from his embassy post and return to the United States, sources say. Administration officials refused to comment on Lilley's plans or a possible successor. The leading candidate is said to be J. Stapleton Roy, who was once second-in-command of the embassy in Beijing.
NEWS
February 2, 1989 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
President Bush, filling a key overseas post, has decided to nominate a former CIA officer as ambassador to China, sources said Wednesday. The choice is James R. Lilley, a career intelligence officer who served as CIA station chief in China when Bush headed the U.S. liaison office there in 1974-75.
NEWS
November 17, 1988 | JACK NELSON and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
A campaign to dump William H. Webster as CIA director has been launched by veterans of the intelligence community who contend that he has been too cautious about launching clandestine operations and too vigorous in disciplining agency personnel linked to the Iran-Contra scandal. A key participant in the drive, according to knowledgeable sources, is Donald P. Gregg, national security adviser to President-elect George Bush, who served as a link between Bush's office and Oliver L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1990
There were no promises but there was a willingness to continue talking. In the difficult U.S.-China dialogue on human rights, that's real progress and reason for hope. When Chinese officials met with Richard Schifter, the State Department's top human-rights envoy, in Beijing last week, it was the first time they discussed the human-rights issue in detail with a U.S. official.
NEWS
August 15, 1989 | From Reuters
All of next term's new students at Beijing University, a hotbed of recent unrest, will be sent to army academies for a year of military and political training, a university official said Monday. Huang Weicheng, head of the president's office, said October's intake of first-year students will also be cut to 800 from the more than 2,000 originally planned. "The students will go through military and political training. They--men and women--will learn basic culture and military affairs," he said.
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