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James R Schlesinger

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NEWS
February 27, 1987
Former Defense Secretary James R. Schlesinger has been named to conduct a comprehensive review of the bogged-down construction of the new U.S. Embassy in Moscow, the State Department said. The project, begun in 1980 and originally scheduled for completion in July, 1982, has been delayed by cost overruns and efforts to ensure that eavesdropping equipment is not slipped into the structure by Soviet security agents. Schlesinger is expected to complete his review by mid-May.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2014 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
James R. Schlesinger, the hawkish and sometimes overbearingly erudite conservative whose controversial Washington career included serving as U.S. secretary of Defense under Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford before becoming the nation's first Energy chief in Jimmy Carter's administration, died Thursday at a Baltimore hospital where he was being treated for pneumonia. He was 85. His death was confirmed by his daughter, Ann Schlesinger. A Harvard University-trained economist, Schlesinger built an impressive resume of government service, beginning with his appointment as assistant director of the Office of Management and Budget after Nixon's presidential victory in 1968.
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NEWS
June 27, 1989 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
A panel of former senior government officials, in a report from the Johns Hopkins Foreign Policy Institute, urged the Bush Administration on Monday to avoid any "wholesale rethinking" of the U.S.-Soviet arms control process inherited from the Reagan Administration. "The current outline of a START (for strategic arms reduction talks) agreement is about as good as can be expected at the present stage and is generally in the U.S. security interest," according to the 11-member bipartisan panel led by Harold Brown and James R. Schlesinger, former defense secretaries from Democratic and Republican administrations, respectively.
NEWS
September 22, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two former defense secretaries under Richard M. Nixon testified Monday that the U.S. government believed in 1973 that many American fliers remained in enemy hands in Laos and were not returned with other prisoners at the end of the Vietnam War, despite Nixon's public assurances to the contrary. "As of now, I can come to no other conclusion. (But) that does not mean there are any alive today," said former Defense Secretary James R. Schlesinger, who also once served as head of the CIA.
NEWS
June 9, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Former Defense Secretary James R. Schlesinger said Monday that the new U.S. Embassy building in Moscow needs to be fundamentally restructured because of Soviet listening devices in the walls and floors but will not have to be demolished. Giving reporters a preview of what he plans to report to Secretary of State George P. Shultz later this month in Washington, Schlesinger said that it will cost "many tens of millions of dollars" and take years to make the new building usable.
NEWS
June 30, 1987 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL, Times Staff Writer
Former Defense Secretary James R. Schlesinger, completing a five-month security examination ordered by Secretary of State George P. Shultz, has recommended demolition of the top three floors of the unfinished eight-story, $196-million U.S. Embassy in Moscow, which U.S. officials say is "honeycombed" with Soviet bugging devices.
NEWS
September 22, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two former defense secretaries under Richard M. Nixon testified Monday that the U.S. government believed in 1973 that many American fliers remained in enemy hands in Laos and were not returned with other prisoners at the end of the Vietnam War, despite Nixon's public assurances to the contrary. "As of now, I can come to no other conclusion. (But) that does not mean there are any alive today," said former Defense Secretary James R. Schlesinger, who also once served as head of the CIA.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2014 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
James R. Schlesinger, the hawkish and sometimes overbearingly erudite conservative whose controversial Washington career included serving as U.S. secretary of Defense under Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford before becoming the nation's first Energy chief in Jimmy Carter's administration, died Thursday at a Baltimore hospital where he was being treated for pneumonia. He was 85. His death was confirmed by his daughter, Ann Schlesinger. A Harvard University-trained economist, Schlesinger built an impressive resume of government service, beginning with his appointment as assistant director of the Office of Management and Budget after Nixon's presidential victory in 1968.
OPINION
August 27, 2004
Re "Prison Abuse Panel Faults Leaders," Aug. 25: Former Defense Secretary James R. Schlesinger, head of the panel investigating the Abu Ghraib prison abuses, harshly criticized Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld in the panel's conclusion but then stated he should not resign because his departure would "be a boon to all America's enemies." This can be interpreted only one way: Getting rid of an incompetent secretary of Defense would help our enemies. My guess is that in November the voters will not agree with Schlesinger that a forced departure of incompetent people would be a boon to all America's enemies and will vote out the incompetent administration of President Bush.
NEWS
June 27, 1989 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
A panel of former senior government officials, in a report from the Johns Hopkins Foreign Policy Institute, urged the Bush Administration on Monday to avoid any "wholesale rethinking" of the U.S.-Soviet arms control process inherited from the Reagan Administration. "The current outline of a START (for strategic arms reduction talks) agreement is about as good as can be expected at the present stage and is generally in the U.S. security interest," according to the 11-member bipartisan panel led by Harold Brown and James R. Schlesinger, former defense secretaries from Democratic and Republican administrations, respectively.
NEWS
June 30, 1987 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL, Times Staff Writer
Former Defense Secretary James R. Schlesinger, completing a five-month security examination ordered by Secretary of State George P. Shultz, has recommended demolition of the top three floors of the unfinished eight-story, $196-million U.S. Embassy in Moscow, which U.S. officials say is "honeycombed" with Soviet bugging devices.
NEWS
June 9, 1987 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Former Defense Secretary James R. Schlesinger said Monday that the new U.S. Embassy building in Moscow needs to be fundamentally restructured because of Soviet listening devices in the walls and floors but will not have to be demolished. Giving reporters a preview of what he plans to report to Secretary of State George P. Shultz later this month in Washington, Schlesinger said that it will cost "many tens of millions of dollars" and take years to make the new building usable.
NEWS
February 27, 1987
Former Defense Secretary James R. Schlesinger has been named to conduct a comprehensive review of the bogged-down construction of the new U.S. Embassy in Moscow, the State Department said. The project, begun in 1980 and originally scheduled for completion in July, 1982, has been delayed by cost overruns and efforts to ensure that eavesdropping equipment is not slipped into the structure by Soviet security agents. Schlesinger is expected to complete his review by mid-May.
NATIONAL
September 19, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Seven former CIA directors have asked President Obama to quash a criminal investigation into harsh Bush-era interrogations of terrorism suspects. The CIA directors, who served Democratic and Republican presidents and include three who worked under President George W. Bush, made their request in a letter to the White House. Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr. announced last month that he was appointing an independent counsel to investigate possible abuses by CIA personnel during interrogations.
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