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James R Sylla

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December 9, 1987 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, Times Staff Writer
It was a Christmas luncheon at the Downtown Club in Los Angeles that brought Chevron USA President James R. Sylla to the Southland and, ultimately, to his death. Sylla was one of four Chevron employees who perished Monday when PSA Flight 1771 crashed and disintegrated in the Santa Lucia Mountains. The other three, en route to San Francisco for a three-day meeting of Chevron public affairs officials from around the world, were Owen F. Murphy, 60, who was based in Los Angeles; Jocelyn G.
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NEWS
December 9, 1987 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, Times Staff Writer
It was a Christmas luncheon at the Downtown Club in Los Angeles that brought Chevron USA President James R. Sylla to the Southland and, ultimately, to his death. Sylla was one of four Chevron employees who perished Monday when PSA Flight 1771 crashed and disintegrated in the Santa Lucia Mountains. The other three, en route to San Francisco for a three-day meeting of Chevron public affairs officials from around the world, were Owen F. Murphy, 60, who was based in Los Angeles; Jocelyn G.
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BUSINESS
August 21, 1986
San Francisco-based Chevron Corp. named three corporate vice presidents to its executive committee. They are Sellers Stough, finance; James N. Sullivan, environmental affairs and engineering, and James R. Sylla, president of Chevron U.S.A.
NEWS
December 21, 1987 | Associated Press
James R. Sylla, former president of Chevron's domestic oil and gas subsidiary, was eulogized Sunday as a chief executive who was as likely to be found chatting with refinery workers at company picnics as dining with the chairman of the board. About 500 mourners crowded into the First United Methodist Church to pay tribute to Sylla, 53, a Kentfield resident and civic activist. Sylla was killed along with three other Chevron executives and 39 other people in the Dec.
BUSINESS
December 9, 1987 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, Times Staff Writer
Corporations around the country Tuesday dusted off and reassessed their guidelines for executives traveling together in the wake of the crash of PSA Flight 1771, which killed the president and three other managers of Chevron USA and three officials of Pacific Bell. The policies, which typically prohibit groups of key officials from flying together on one plane, have become increasingly common among large companies in recent years. The plans are designed to ensure management continuity.
NEWS
December 8, 1987 | ERIC MALNIC, Times Staff Writer
A Pacific Southwest Airlines commuter jet carrying 39 passengers and a crew of five from Los Angeles to San Francisco crashed Monday afternoon in the mountainous back country of San Luis Obispo County after the pilot reported gunfire in the back of the plane, federal authorities said. All aboard were killed. Flight 1771 crashed at 4:17 p.m., about 45 minutes after it took off from Los Angeles International Airport.
NEWS
April 4, 1996 | MARTHA GROVES and NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The crash of Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown's plane Wednesday in Croatia represents the nation's largest loss of top-level executive talent in a single tragedy, leaving a void at several companies, including Parsons Corp., the venerable Pasadena construction and engineering firm.
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