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James Randi

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NEWS
October 17, 1993 | ROBERT KOEHLER
James (The Amazing) Randi used to be content escaping Houdini-style from locks and straitjackets while suspended over a Manhattan boulevard. But with the rise of popularity in all things paranormal in the '60s--from UFO sightings to Uri Geller bending spoons--Randi began a crusade to show that paranormal claims were nothing more than the results of the kind of magic tricks he learned long ago as a teen-age student of magician Harry Blackstone.
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NEWS
April 1, 2011 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
We doubt that either Dr. Oz or Andrew Wakefield will be proudly displaying these honors on their mantelpieces: Both received "Pigasus Awards" this April 1 from the  James  Randi  Educational  Foundation for the dubious honor of being among the "5 worst promoters of nonsense. " Dr. Mehmet Oz got the "Media" Pigasus. The foundation explains why he won the prize: "Dr. Oz is a Harvard-educated cardiac physician who, through his syndicated TV show, has promoted faith healing, 'energy medicine,' and other quack theories that have no scientific basis.
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BOOKS
September 2, 1990 | Malcolm Dean, Dean is author of "The Astrology Game" (Beaufort).
The printing press was barely 33 years old when Michel de Notredame (Nostradamus) was born in Provence. In 1503, the new technology already was bringing authors to celebrity and wealth as it penetrated middle- and upper-class society. In 1550, Nostradamus began issuing his annual astrological almanacs, launching a career that would guarantee his place in history. Five years later, the first edition of his most famous work, the "Centuries," appeared.
NEWS
February 7, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
James Randi launched a bold challenge Saturday that aims to debunk so-called homeopathic drugs. The fraud-busting magician even offered $1 million to any manufacturer who could prove they work as directed. RELATED: Magician James Randi, skeptics launch attack on makers of homeopathic 'drugs' Finding science and medicine experts to defend homeopathy isn't easy. The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine offers a primer complete with an explanation of homeopathy regulation, the status of research and more.
NEWS
September 13, 1991 | MICHAEL J. YBARRA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Also run your fingers very smoothly Up and down the object Barely touching the metal Stroking it tenderly While repeating in your mind "Bend . . . Bend." --Uri Geller song/poem Caressing the silvery fork, the young Israeli demonstrated his unusual gift. After a few moments the flatware was bent like a dog's leg. Psychic power, said Uri Geller. A gaggle of Time magazine editors, professional skeptics and scandal seekers all, looked on in bewilderment. Then Geller left.
BOOKS
October 7, 1990
We at Griffith Observatory had our hands full with damage control during the Nostradamania and earthquake panic of May, 1988, when many self-proclaimed psychics and astrologers had their way with our collective psyche and predicted a catastrophic quake that never came. I am therefore mystified by Malcolm Dean's review of James Randi's "The Mask of Nostradamus." Almost half of the review was devoted to a discussion of the alleged "Mars effect" of Gauquelin (misspelled in Dean's report as Gauguelin )
MAGAZINE
February 21, 1999
Who appointed Michael Shermer head of the psychic police ("Medium of the Moment," by Paul Lieberman, Jan. 24)? If James Van Praagh can bring comfort to grieving relatives, is what he does so bad? Shermer and his skeptics group sound like a bunch of elitist, hypocritical neurotics. He preaches against gurus, yet his literature identifies James Randi as their spiritual leader. Isn't that a guru? Shermer offers up a lot of claptrap and mostly gets away with it; thinking people have better things to do than pay attention.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2002
Thanks to Brian Lowry for his excellent article about the "Crossing Over" show and others of that ilk ("Room for Doubt? There Ought to Be," Sept. 4). For years, my good friend Michael Shermer has been in the front line battling the charlatans and has been looking for responsible representation in the media to present his point of view. The James Randi Educational Foundation has held endless meetings with network executives in the past decade to discuss the possibility of a TV series to examine--and test--the talking-with-the-dead con artists, as well as faith-healers and other quacks.
NEWS
October 6, 1991
In the article about my libel suits against James Randi, when Randi claims that my performances can be duplicated by methods found long ago on cereal boxes, he attacks not only my abilities but also my originality. That is defamation aside from any paranormal issue. After all, spoon bending is my professional trademark. And, most important, what your writer overlooked in the article was the fact that Randi has done far more than attack my abilities. He has made easily proved lies, such as claiming that I was responsible for the suicide of a scientist friend (who actually died of natural causes)
BOOKS
January 24, 1993 | Dick Roraback
CONJURING By James Randi, Esq. (St. Martin's: $29.95; 314 pp.) . James (The Amazing) Randi is not going to tell you how it's done. You didn't want to know anyway, did you? Even Roman philosopher Seneca preferred ignorance: "It is the trickery itself that pleases me; show how it's done and I have lost interest." Instead, Randi has twirled his cape and--Presto!--revealed the world of magic through the men (and a few women) who make it work.
NEWS
February 5, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Magician James Randi, who has devoted the latter part of his career to exposing fraud, scams and charlatans, and a network of skeptics known as the 10:23 Campaign launched a major campaign Saturday against the manufacturers of so-called homeopathic drugs, charging that the companies that sell the drugs are packaging worthless products that are cheating customers out of their money. In an online video , Randi consumed an overdose of homeopathic sleeping pills to demonstrate that they have no effect, and skeptics elsewhere consumed large overdoses of other homeopathic drugs in similar demonstrations.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2002
Thanks to Brian Lowry for his excellent article about the "Crossing Over" show and others of that ilk ("Room for Doubt? There Ought to Be," Sept. 4). For years, my good friend Michael Shermer has been in the front line battling the charlatans and has been looking for responsible representation in the media to present his point of view. The James Randi Educational Foundation has held endless meetings with network executives in the past decade to discuss the possibility of a TV series to examine--and test--the talking-with-the-dead con artists, as well as faith-healers and other quacks.
MAGAZINE
February 21, 1999
Who appointed Michael Shermer head of the psychic police ("Medium of the Moment," by Paul Lieberman, Jan. 24)? If James Van Praagh can bring comfort to grieving relatives, is what he does so bad? Shermer and his skeptics group sound like a bunch of elitist, hypocritical neurotics. He preaches against gurus, yet his literature identifies James Randi as their spiritual leader. Isn't that a guru? Shermer offers up a lot of claptrap and mostly gets away with it; thinking people have better things to do than pay attention.
NEWS
October 17, 1993 | ROBERT KOEHLER
James (The Amazing) Randi used to be content escaping Houdini-style from locks and straitjackets while suspended over a Manhattan boulevard. But with the rise of popularity in all things paranormal in the '60s--from UFO sightings to Uri Geller bending spoons--Randi began a crusade to show that paranormal claims were nothing more than the results of the kind of magic tricks he learned long ago as a teen-age student of magician Harry Blackstone.
BOOKS
January 24, 1993 | Dick Roraback
CONJURING By James Randi, Esq. (St. Martin's: $29.95; 314 pp.) . James (The Amazing) Randi is not going to tell you how it's done. You didn't want to know anyway, did you? Even Roman philosopher Seneca preferred ignorance: "It is the trickery itself that pleases me; show how it's done and I have lost interest." Instead, Randi has twirled his cape and--Presto!--revealed the world of magic through the men (and a few women) who make it work.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1992
The eminent film producer Ray Stark appears to be having a difficult time finding an exciting plot in the life of Harry Houdini. This is about as demanding as discovering a sports theme in the Babe Ruth story ("Houdini, the Movie: Many Have Escaped Already," Film Clips, Oct. 11). Houdini, one of 10 children of a failed Hungarian rabbi, rose from a poor home in Appleton, Wis., to become the unchallenged king of all the magicians who ever lived, and his name is still invoked to describe various impossibilities achieved by those performers today who emulate his feats.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1992
The eminent film producer Ray Stark appears to be having a difficult time finding an exciting plot in the life of Harry Houdini. This is about as demanding as discovering a sports theme in the Babe Ruth story ("Houdini, the Movie: Many Have Escaped Already," Film Clips, Oct. 11). Houdini, one of 10 children of a failed Hungarian rabbi, rose from a poor home in Appleton, Wis., to become the unchallenged king of all the magicians who ever lived, and his name is still invoked to describe various impossibilities achieved by those performers today who emulate his feats.
NEWS
October 6, 1991
In the article about my libel suits against James Randi, when Randi claims that my performances can be duplicated by methods found long ago on cereal boxes, he attacks not only my abilities but also my originality. That is defamation aside from any paranormal issue. After all, spoon bending is my professional trademark. And, most important, what your writer overlooked in the article was the fact that Randi has done far more than attack my abilities. He has made easily proved lies, such as claiming that I was responsible for the suicide of a scientist friend (who actually died of natural causes)
NEWS
September 13, 1991 | MICHAEL J. YBARRA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Also run your fingers very smoothly Up and down the object Barely touching the metal Stroking it tenderly While repeating in your mind "Bend . . . Bend." --Uri Geller song/poem Caressing the silvery fork, the young Israeli demonstrated his unusual gift. After a few moments the flatware was bent like a dog's leg. Psychic power, said Uri Geller. A gaggle of Time magazine editors, professional skeptics and scandal seekers all, looked on in bewilderment. Then Geller left.
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