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December 16, 2007 | Don Lee, Times Staff Writer
When James Rice first arrived in southern China in 1987, locals flocked to get a closer look at the 6-foot-1, 185-pound Californian with brown hair and hazel eyes. Most people in remote Yunnan province had never seen a white man before, so when they caught up with him as he glided on "speedy shoes," as they called his rollerblades, some would pinch his skin or touch his long legs. Twenty years later, 20 pounds heavier and white streaks over his brush-cut hair, Rice still draws a crowd in China.
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BUSINESS
December 16, 2007 | Don Lee, Times Staff Writer
When James Rice first arrived in southern China in 1987, locals flocked to get a closer look at the 6-foot-1, 185-pound Californian with brown hair and hazel eyes. Most people in remote Yunnan province had never seen a white man before, so when they caught up with him as he glided on "speedy shoes," as they called his rollerblades, some would pinch his skin or touch his long legs. Twenty years later, 20 pounds heavier and white streaks over his brush-cut hair, Rice still draws a crowd in China.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 2002 | From Associated Press
A 71-year-old woman who escaped from a California prison camp four years ago and disguised herself through plastic surgery was arrested Thursday after authorities received a tip. At the time of her August 1998 escape, Astarte Rice-Davis was serving a 15-year federal sentence for embezzling from her husband's estate. James Rice had disappeared from his Virgin Islands home in 1986. The body of the Contra Costa developer was never found and he was declared dead in 1988.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 2002 | From Associated Press
A 71-year-old woman who escaped from a California prison camp four years ago and disguised herself through plastic surgery was arrested Thursday after authorities received a tip. At the time of her August 1998 escape, Astarte Rice-Davis was serving a 15-year federal sentence for embezzling from her husband's estate. James Rice had disappeared from his Virgin Islands home in 1986. The body of the Contra Costa developer was never found and he was declared dead in 1988.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1999 | PHILIP BRANDES
"Shut Your Eyes and Think of England," a British farce with modest ambitions, receives an appropriately breezy and innocuous staging at the Knightsbridge Theatre in Pasadena. John Chapman and Anthony Marriott's arch dialogue pokes fun at England's not-too-distant financial troubles, when the influx of Arab money threatened the very core of the country's centuries-encrusted class snobbery.
NEWS
July 15, 1995
James S. Rice, 75, a telecommunications executive who had been vice president and group executive of ITT. He also served as president and chief executive officer of Santa Ana-based Data Technology Corp. Born in Chicago, he earned a bachelor's degree in engineering from the University of Detroit, an MBA from USC and a law degree from Georgetown University. He served in the Naval Air Transport Service during World War II.
BUSINESS
May 5, 2008 | Don Lee, Times Staff Writer
Liu Keli couldn't tell you much about South Carolina, not even where it is in the United States. It's as obscure to him as his home region, Shanxi province, is to most Americans. But Liu is investing $10 million in the Palmetto State, building a printing-plate factory that will open this fall and hire 120 workers. His main aim is to tap the large American market, but when his finance staff penciled out the costs, he was stunned to learn how they compared with those in China.
NEWS
March 7, 1998 | Associated Press
A jury convicted three jail guards of misconduct Friday in the vicious beatings of immigrants who had rioted at a federal detention center to protest their mistreatment. The detainees were forced to walk by corrections officers saying "America is No. 1," while the guards punched and kicked them, authorities said. Sgt. Charles Popovic, Sgt.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1996 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Long Beach Playhouse's "Murder at the Vicarage" has a decent enough payoff. Like any self-respecting whodunit, this one tosses out an obvious suspect or two and then brings in a big curtain-closing surprise in which all is revealed. Sure, the ending of "Murder," which was based on an Agatha Christie novel, isn't bad. Playwrights Charles and Barbara Toy understand the genre, and most people probably will be kept wondering until the last lines of dialogue are delivered.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1991 | JAMES SCARBOROUGH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To director Sheryl Donchey's credit, her treatment of "Guys and Dolls" at Rancho Santiago College leaves this classic in recognizable form. It's not that the Frank Loesser musical is shoddily done by the college's Professional Actors Conservatory. The stage is fixed up in a Cubist style that serves to excite the eye in a confetti swirl of color and silhouetted forms. This effectively captures the vibrancy of a crowded city street scene.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1999 | PHILIP BRANDES
"Shut Your Eyes and Think of England," a British farce with modest ambitions, receives an appropriately breezy and innocuous staging at the Knightsbridge Theatre in Pasadena. John Chapman and Anthony Marriott's arch dialogue pokes fun at England's not-too-distant financial troubles, when the influx of Arab money threatened the very core of the country's centuries-encrusted class snobbery.
NEWS
July 15, 1995
James S. Rice, 75, a telecommunications executive who had been vice president and group executive of ITT. He also served as president and chief executive officer of Santa Ana-based Data Technology Corp. Born in Chicago, he earned a bachelor's degree in engineering from the University of Detroit, an MBA from USC and a law degree from Georgetown University. He served in the Naval Air Transport Service during World War II.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 1995 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The real mystery in Agatha Christie plays, at least to some directors, is style. The style has not been completely solved by director Hugh Harrison in Long Beach Playhouse's production of Christie's "Spider's Web." Too often, Americans, when doing British plays, depend on stereotypes for their models, and their choices aren't always the most reliable. Christie writes about the upper class of her day, and one has to remember that even when they are titled, her characters are very real people.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1992 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Equus," Peter Shaffer's play about a young man who undergoes therapy after blinding six horses, is a torturous experience, an uneasy bonding of psychology, religious exploration and individual agony. There's no doubt that Shaffer packed a lot into his drama: violence, nudity, rage, tears, youthful discovery, midlife crisis, even a laugh or two.
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