Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJames Ries
IN THE NEWS

James Ries

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1991 | JOHN BOUDREAU, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It happens at the oddest hours. James and Linda Ries' collection of California paintings, among the best of its era and region, seem to whisper for them. "We will very often wake up at 2 in the morning, get up and rearrange the paintings," James Ries explains. "It's quiet. The phone isn't ringing. It's wonderful to be able to pad around the house and move things around. You can't help yourself; it's a very compelling thing."
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1991 | JOHN BOUDREAU, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It happens at the oddest hours. James and Linda Ries' collection of California paintings, among the best of its era and region, seem to whisper for them. "We will very often wake up at 2 in the morning, get up and rearrange the paintings," James Ries explains. "It's quiet. The phone isn't ringing. It's wonderful to be able to pad around the house and move things around. You can't help yourself; it's a very compelling thing."
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2009 | Esmeralda Bermudez
At a church in Fullerton, a prayer group went from 40 people to nearly 600 in the last year. And in Anaheim, the pews are so packed on Sundays that one priest wants to add a ninth Mass to meet demand. Parishioners arrive disheartened, some at wit's end, to ask God, priests, nuns and office staff to help them find work and save their homes. But although prayer soothes the soul, it doesn't pay the mortgage.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2004 | Roger Vincent, Times Staff Writer
The oldest Art Deco building in Los Angeles has been sold for $9 million to a Beverly Hills real estate investment company. Built by high-end haberdasher James Oviatt in the 1920s, the 12-story Oviatt Building still has some Jazz Age sizzle, with frosted glass designed by Rene Lalique in windows and doors, a three-faced neon clock on the roof and a luxurious penthouse that includes a replica of a Pullman-car stateroom. Blue Real Estate Management bought the 96,000-square-foot landmark at 617 S.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|