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James Risen

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BUSINESS
April 26, 1991
The Overseas Press Club of America has awarded its 1990 prize for economics and business reporting to James Risen of the Los Angeles Times, the New York-based organization has announced. The $1,000 prize, sponsored by Forbes magazine, was presented for a series Risen wrote, "The Quality Gap: Why Japanese Auto Makers Are Still Winning," which appeared in The Times in January, 1990.
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OPINION
July 24, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
In ruling that a New York Times reporter must testify at the trial of a former CIA employee accused of leaking classified information, a federal appeals court has adopted a scorched-earth approach to claims that reporters have a right to protect their sources. If the Obama administration persists in its attempt to force James Risen to violate a pledge of confidentiality, the Supreme Court should intervene to protect him. Last week, the U.S. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals in Virginia ruled 2 to 1 that Risen must respond to a subpoena seeking his testimony in the trial of Jeffrey Sterling.
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BUSINESS
May 28, 1995 | JAMES RISEN, JAMES RISEN writes about the economy from The Times' Washington bureau
If President Clinton goes through with his vow to slap 100% tariffs on 13 Japanese luxury cars, there will be dancing in the streets of Stuttgart, not Detroit. Clinton's new managed-trade initiative might as well be called "The BMW Relief Act of 1995." Usually it takes a while to figure out just what the unintended side effects of Washington's trade and industrial policies will be. But not this time. The big winners from this U.S.-Japan spat all live in Germany.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2006 | Tim Rutten, Times Staff Writer
JAMES RISEN'S "State of War: The Secret History of the CIA and the Bush Administration" is a damning and dismaying book. Its underlying thesis is that the Bush administration has mucked up virtually everything it has touched when it comes to terrorism, the international Sunni Muslim insurgency created by jihadism and nuclear proliferation.
BUSINESS
September 4, 1994 | JAMES RISEN
Last weekend, Roger Altman was back at his ranch in Wyoming's Jackson Hole, looking tanned and relaxed, entertaining friends like White House chief economist Laura D'Andrea Tyson and her family and planning a backcountry camping trip where the only white water he's likely to encounter will be on the Snake River. Altman, the deputy Treasury secretary who was forced to resign Aug.
BUSINESS
March 19, 1995 | JAMES RISEN, JAMES RISEN writes about the economy from The Times' Washington bureau
Since taking office in January, congressional Republicans have proven they weren't kidding. In the House, they followed through with their vows to go after welfare, school lunches, food stamps--the entire anti-poverty structure--to reverse what they see as decades of wrongheaded policies that have redistributed income to the betterment of the bureaucratic class rather than the poor.
BUSINESS
December 26, 1993 | JAMES RISEN, JAMES RISEN writes about the economy from The Times' Washington bureau
It's Christmas Eve, and George Bailey, chief executive of the Bailey Bros. Building and Loan of Bedford Falls, is in deep trouble. His tiny, family-run S&L has been on the ropes for years, yet Bailey still makes loans to friends and neighbors with little or no collateral or hope of repayment. What's worse, the Bailey Bros. thrift has gone out on a limb and invested most of its money in a real estate development--Bailey Park, a speculative project on raw land on the edge of town.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1995 | JAMES RISEN, JAMES RISEN writes about the economy from The Times' Washington bureau
A quiet sense of anxiety has enveloped the American workplace. Convinced that job security is a thing of the past, U.S. workers are learning to live with a cold fact of life: The balance of power between management and labor has shifted in management's favor. But the roots of the new anxiety among American workers reach deeper. The globalization of the U.S.
BUSINESS
July 18, 1993 | JAMES RISEN, JAMES RISEN covers the economy in The Times' Washington bureau. The Board of Economists' column will return next week
Otto von Bismarck once remarked that the people shouldn't see how their sausages or their laws were made. Could that wily old Prussian possibly have had the Senate's handling of Bill Clinton's budget in mind? Yes, the tax negotiations got ugly, as naked power politics so often does.
BUSINESS
October 10, 1993 | JAMES RISEN, JAMES RISEN reports on the economy from The Times' Washington bureau
Bill Clinton came to Washington promising fundamental economic change. Well, he and his advisers have changed one thing. They've put a new twist on the techniques by which the nation's leaders are accused of--how to put it politely?--dissembling about the numbers backing up their major policy initiatives. The Reagan years brought us the "magic asterisk" and the "rosy scenario."
BOOKS
June 1, 2003 | David Wise, David Wise is the coauthor of "The Invisible Government" and author of "Spy: The Inside Story of How the FBI's Robert Hanssen Betrayed America."
During the Cold War, it was no easy matter for a Russian to volunteer to spy for the CIA. Take the case of Adolf Tolkachev, an aircraft designer in Moscow. Risking his life, Tolkachev tried half a dozen times to approach the agency. He left notes in the cars of two successive CIA station chiefs in Moscow. He got nowhere.
BOOKS
April 5, 1998 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Elizabeth Mehren is the author, most recently, of "After the Darkest Hour, the Sun Will Shine Again" (Fireside, 1997). She is a staff writer for The Times
We were college undergraduates, teenagers still, and the world was full of promise. My friend called late one night. "What's the worst possible thing that could happen?" she asked. I tried to think: a death in the family? It couldn't be divorce. Her parents had already done that, hadn't everyone's? Had they run out of money? Did she wreck her car and kill someone? When she told me she was pregnant, I was first relieved, then shocked. How could she be so stupid, I wondered, so careless.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1995 | JAMES RISEN, JAMES RISEN writes about the economy from The Times' Washington bureau
Is Alan Greenspan, America's economic general, fighting the last war? Increasingly, economists suspect the answer may be yes. Indeed, there are some intriguing new signals coming from the nation's economy that suggest that Federal Reserve Board Chairman Greenspan and his colleagues are foolishly waging a battle that doesn't need to be fought anymore.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1995 | JAMES RISEN, JAMES RISEN writes about the economy from The Times' Washington bureau
A quiet sense of anxiety has enveloped the American workplace. Convinced that job security is a thing of the past, U.S. workers are learning to live with a cold fact of life: The balance of power between management and labor has shifted in management's favor. But the roots of the new anxiety among American workers reach deeper. The globalization of the U.S.
BUSINESS
May 28, 1995 | JAMES RISEN, JAMES RISEN writes about the economy from The Times' Washington bureau
If President Clinton goes through with his vow to slap 100% tariffs on 13 Japanese luxury cars, there will be dancing in the streets of Stuttgart, not Detroit. Clinton's new managed-trade initiative might as well be called "The BMW Relief Act of 1995." Usually it takes a while to figure out just what the unintended side effects of Washington's trade and industrial policies will be. But not this time. The big winners from this U.S.-Japan spat all live in Germany.
BUSINESS
March 19, 1995 | JAMES RISEN, JAMES RISEN writes about the economy from The Times' Washington bureau
Since taking office in January, congressional Republicans have proven they weren't kidding. In the House, they followed through with their vows to go after welfare, school lunches, food stamps--the entire anti-poverty structure--to reverse what they see as decades of wrongheaded policies that have redistributed income to the betterment of the bureaucratic class rather than the poor.
BUSINESS
July 3, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, JAMES RISEN writes about the economy from The Times' Washington bureau.
That dull thud you just heard coming from Washington was the sound of the Clinton health care plan being dropped into the congressional dustbin. The end came quietly for the most ambitious and detailed piece of social legislation to emerge from the White House in at least a generation. In a private White House meeting in mid-June, Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan (D-N.Y.), chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, and his sidekick, ranking committee Republican Sen. Bob Packwood (R-Ore.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1994 | JAMES RISEN
There is a great scene in the movie "Patton" that seems relevant today in the budding trade conflict between the United States and Japan. Early in the film, George C. Scott, playing Gen. George S. Patton Jr., triumphantly surveys the North African battlefield on which his U.S. troops have just wrecked the Afrika Korps of Germany's military genius, Field Marshal Irwin Rommel. "Rommel!" Patton shouts, "I read your book!" Know your adversary. That's one of the oldest rules of combat.
BUSINESS
January 8, 1995 | JAMES RISEN, JAMES RISEN writes about the economy from The Times' Washington bureau
To understand why Bill Clinton has had so much trouble developing a coherent strategy and clear direction for his presidency, look no further than the way he crafted his most important initiative for 1995: the so-called middle-class bill of rights. As he mapped out his budget priorities in the weeks following the November elections, the basic policy choice that confronted Clinton was clear: A) stick to his guns or B) reverse direction and offer a response to the Republican landslide.
BUSINESS
November 13, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, JAMES RISEN writes about the economy from The Times' Washington bureau
On Monday, Bill Archer was just another Republican bomb thrower, an obscure, 24-year back bencher with radical ideas about tax and economic policy. And no one outside his Texas district ever paid much attention to what he had to say.
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