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James Romero Mctague

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1991 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man who managed the Sylmar warehouse where authorities made the largest cocaine bust in history two years ago was sentenced Monday to life without parole. U. S. District Court Judge Terry J. Hatter Jr. told James Romero McTague that he was guilty of "one of the most horrendous crimes that has ever been committed against the American people." McTague, 43, was one of seven people arrested in September, 1989, after the discovery of 21.4 tons of cocaine stacked in boxes in the warehouse.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1991 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man who managed the Sylmar warehouse where authorities made the largest cocaine bust in history two years ago was sentenced Monday to life without parole. U. S. District Court Judge Terry J. Hatter Jr. told James Romero McTague that he was guilty of "one of the most horrendous crimes that has ever been committed against the American people." McTague, 43, was one of seven people arrested in September, 1989, after the discovery of 21.4 tons of cocaine stacked in boxes in the warehouse.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1991 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man who managed the Sylmar warehouse where authorities made the largest cocaine bust in history two years ago was sentenced to life without parole Monday. U.S. District Court Judge Terry J. Hatter Jr. told James Romero McTague that he was guilty of "one of the most horrendous crimes that has ever been committed against the American people." McTague, 43, was one of seven people arrested in September, 1989, after the discovery of 21.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1991 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man who managed the Sylmar warehouse where authorities made the largest cocaine bust in history two years ago was sentenced to life without parole Monday. U.S. District Court Judge Terry J. Hatter Jr. told James Romero McTague that he was guilty of "one of the most horrendous crimes that has ever been committed against the American people." McTague, 43, was one of seven people arrested in September, 1989, after the discovery of 21.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1990 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration's war on drugs is pressuring prosecutors to gain convictions at any cost against six men arrested in connection with the record cocaine seizure at a Sylmar warehouse, defense attorneys charged in final arguments as the case went to the jury Wednesday. "There is a drug war going on in this country," attorney Marlene Gerdts told jurors in federal court in Los Angeles. "There is pressure put on prosecutors . . . to get a conviction. . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1990 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When authorities raided a Sylmar warehouse a year ago, seizing 21.4 tons of cocaine, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration said the drug cache was the largest ever recorded anywhere in the world. But now, as the trial of six defendants charged with stockpiling the cocaine unfolds in a federal courtroom in Los Angeles, authorities say the amount of drugs distributed by the ring was far greater than they had imagined.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1989
Seven men arrested in connection with the record 21.4-ton cocaine seizure in a raid of a Sylmar warehouse pleaded not guilty Monday in U.S. District Court to an indictment charging them with conspiracy and possession with intent to deliver cocaine. Judge Terry J.
NEWS
October 30, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Six men arrested after authorities shut down a warehouse where a record 21 tons of cocaine was seized pleaded innocent to drug charges before a federal magistrate today. The six were arrested after authorities raided the warehouse in the suburban Sylmar area Sept. 28 and seized the cocaine, the largest such confiscation in world history. They appeared for arraignment before U.S. Magistrate John R. Kronenberg.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1991 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former Mexican customs official, whom prosecutors called "the patriarch" of a drug trafficking ring broken with the seizure of a record 21.4 tons of cocaine in a San Fernando Valley warehouse, was sentenced Monday in Los Angeles federal court to life in prison without parole . "This is a case that cries out for the maximum sentence," U.S. District Judge Terry J. Hatter Jr. said in imposing the prison term on Carlos Tapia-Ponce. "Society must be protected as best it can."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1990 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Texas man on trial in Los Angeles in connection with the largest drug seizure in U.S. history confessed to federal drug agents that he played a major role in the smuggling ring, an agent testified Friday. Authorities say the smuggling ring distributed up to five tons of cocaine a week out of a Sylmar warehouse.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1990 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration's war on drugs is pressuring prosecutors to gain convictions at any cost against six men arrested in connection with the record cocaine seizure at a Sylmar warehouse, defense attorneys charged in final arguments as the case went to the jury Wednesday. "There is a drug war going on in this country," attorney Marlene Gerdts told jurors in federal court in Los Angeles. "There is pressure put on prosecutors . . . to get a conviction. . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1990 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When authorities raided a Sylmar warehouse a year ago, seizing 21.4 tons of cocaine, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration said the drug cache was the largest ever recorded anywhere in the world. But now, as the trial of six defendants charged with stockpiling the cocaine unfolds in a federal courtroom in Los Angeles, authorities say the amount of drugs distributed by the ring was far greater than they had imagined.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1989 | MICHAEL CONNELLY and LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A man who allegedly drove a semi-trailer truck delivering cocaine to the Sylmar warehouse that was the scene of the world's biggest narcotics seizure was arraigned in low-profile proceedings Wednesday in Los Angeles Municipal Court. Gilberto Mendoza, 28, of New Mexico pleaded not guilty to charges of transportation of cocaine and possession of cocaine for sale. He was then taken to an undisclosed location, where he is being held on $9-million bail.
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