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James Rowland

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NEWS
June 27, 1989 | CARL INGRAM, Times Staff Writer
In a setback to efforts to bring the mushrooming California prison population to manageable levels by 1995, the Deukmejian Administration is forecasting a surprise surge in prisoners that could touch off another frenetic round of prison construction. State Director of Corrections James Rowland disclosed in a letter made public Monday that revised projections show that by June, 1994, the prison population will total 136,640. That would be 26,410 more than had been estimated only last fall.
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NEWS
June 27, 1989 | CARL INGRAM, Times Staff Writer
In a setback to efforts to bring the mushrooming California prison population to manageable levels by 1995, the Deukmejian Administration is forecasting a surprise surge in prisoners that could touch off another frenetic round of prison construction. State Director of Corrections James Rowland disclosed in a letter made public Monday that revised projections show that by June, 1994, the prison population will total 136,640. That would be 26,410 more than had been estimated only last fall.
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NEWS
August 7, 1989
The cost of operating prisons in California is expected to increase, costing $4 billion annually by 1994. That is more than double the current bill, according to prison officials. In addition, taxpayers can expect to spend $3.5 billion to build new prisons in the next five years. Corrections Director James Rowland said that the costs stem from projections that the state will have 136,000 people in prison by 1994, compared to 82,800 locked up now. The state currently spends about $1.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | Associated Press
The state on Saturday chose to locate a medium-security prison west of here and officials were confident residents would accept it. "I applaud the citizens of Imperial County for their interest and commitment to this project and look forward to a strong and lasting partnership with them," said James Rowland, state corrections director. Rowland said up to 1,770 people would be hired to run the prison. Construction for the 2,200-bed prison was slated for next summer.
NEWS
October 3, 1987 | United Press International
An unincorporated site about six miles southeast of Chowchilla has been chosen for the 2,000-bed women's prison to be built in Madera County, state Department of Corrections Director James Rowland announced Friday. He said that the site is one of three evaluated in an environmental impact report for the prison and that it has received strong community support.
BUSINESS
February 21, 1988
James A. Rowland, president and chief operating officer of Safeway Stores Inc., will retire at the end of March after 50 years at the company. Peter A. Magowan, 45-year-old chairman and chief executive, will assume the additional title of president upon Rowland's departure. Rowland, 64, has been president of Safeway since 1983.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1987
An environmental study began this week for the proposed 2,200-bed Mira Loma prison near Lancaster, Director James Rowland of the state Department of Corrections announced. Rowland also said work on an environmental impact report was begun in late November for a 1,450-bed, medium-security reception center in downtown Los Angeles, one of the two prison sites in Los Angeles County approved by the Legislature in July.
BUSINESS
May 14, 1986 | VICTOR F. ZONANA
Safeway Stores said Tuesday that it has reshuffled its top management to give two key executives broader exposure to the company's retailing operations. Under the plan approved by the firm's board, E. Richard Jones relinquished his post as executive vice president in charge of information services and planning, as well as his spot in the company's five-member office of the chairman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1988 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, Times Staff Writer
Acting on a request from Assemblyman Larry Stirling, a legislative committee has subpoenaed the Department of Corrections to provide confidential records on the alleged involvement of San Diego defense lawyer Alex Landon in the escape of an inmate near the state prison at Chino more than 15 years ago.
OPINION
December 24, 1989
Sure, governments should contract with private business to conduct public services if the businesses can do the job as well, or better, and at lower cost. No argument there. But governments must also take care that they they do not lease their responsibility to the lowest bidder without being certain that the public trust is fully protected.
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