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April 24, 1995 | Associated Press
Former White House Press Secretary James S. Brady received Illinois' highest honor for his gun-control work. Brady, a native of Centralia, Ill., received the medallion of the Order of Lincoln on Saturday in a ceremony at Southern Illinois University. A rally outside drew about 150 opponents of gun control. Brady was shot in the head in the 1981 assassination attempt on President Ronald Reagan and remains paralyzed.
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NEWS
November 30, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The condition of James S. Brady--former President Ronald Reagan's White House press secretary--was improving steadily, a day after his heart stopped during a dental surgical procedure, according to a hospital spokeswoman. "His condition has been upgraded from critical to serious to fair," said the spokeswoman for Fairfax Hospital in northern Virginia. Brady was "currently alert and talking," she added. The former White House official was wounded during the 1981 attempt on Reagan's life.
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NEWS
November 30, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The condition of James S. Brady--former President Ronald Reagan's White House press secretary--was improving steadily, a day after his heart stopped during a dental surgical procedure, according to a hospital spokeswoman. "His condition has been upgraded from critical to serious to fair," said the spokeswoman for Fairfax Hospital in northern Virginia. Brady was "currently alert and talking," she added. The former White House official was wounded during the 1981 attempt on Reagan's life.
NEWS
April 24, 1995 | Associated Press
Former White House Press Secretary James S. Brady received Illinois' highest honor for his gun-control work. Brady, a native of Centralia, Ill., received the medallion of the Order of Lincoln on Saturday in a ceremony at Southern Illinois University. A rally outside drew about 150 opponents of gun control. Brady was shot in the head in the 1981 assassination attempt on President Ronald Reagan and remains paralyzed.
NEWS
November 22, 1989 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former White House Press Secretary James S. Brady said from his wheelchair Tuesday that lawmakers who oppose a seven-day waiting period for handgun purchases are "cowardly lions" who have caved in to pressure from the National Rifle Assn. Testifying before a congressional hearing for the first time since he was shot eight years ago, Brady suggested that lawmakers "try being in my shoes for just one day."
NEWS
October 17, 1991 | LIANNE HART and TRACY WOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the deadliest shooting spree in U.S. history, a man crashed his pickup truck into a cafeteria crowded with lunchtime patrons here Wednesday afternoon and began firing rapidly and indiscriminately with a semiautomatic pistol, killing 22 people. The gunman later was found dead of a gunshot wound in a restaurant restroom, police said. The massacre resulted in injuries to 20 others, many of them listed in "very critical condition."
NEWS
June 10, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
John W. Hinckley Jr., who shot President Reagan in 1981, appeared in court seeking permission to visit his parents away from the mental hospital where he was been confined since 1982. Under the proposal, Hinckley, 42, would be released to his parents for monthly 12-hour visits. Psychologist Kirk Heilbrun said he is ready for the visits. However, Assistant U.S. Atty. Thomas Zeno questioned his progress and argued that Hinckley's past behavior was too erratic.
NEWS
April 12, 1988
A federal judge in Washington ordered presidential assailant John W. Hinckley Jr. to be questioned in a deposition prior to a civil trial arising from the 1981 shooting of President Reagan. U.S. District Judge John Garrett Penn approved a motion by lawyers representing White House Press Secretary James S. Brady and two others wounded in the March 30, 1981, shooting to question Hinckley before the case goes to trial.
NEWS
March 13, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
James S. Brady, the former White House press secretary severely wounded in the 1981 assassination attempt on President Ronald Reagan, announced today he is accepting an unpaid full-time job as vice chairman of the National Organization on Disability. In a dramatic gesture at his news conference, Brady left the wheelchair where he has been confined since the shooting and walked with the aid of a cane to the podium. "The bear is back for good now," he said, referring to his nickname.
NEWS
November 22, 1989 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former White House Press Secretary James S. Brady said from his wheelchair Tuesday that lawmakers who oppose a seven-day waiting period for handgun purchases are "cowardly lions" who have caved in to pressure from the National Rifle Assn. Testifying before a congressional hearing for the first time since he was shot eight years ago, Brady suggested that lawmakers "try being in my shoes for just one day."
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