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December 22, 2000 | From the Washington Post
President-elect George W. Bush has picked Virginia Gov. James S. Gilmore, a tough-minded, tax-cutting conservative with a talent for raising money, to become the chairman of the Republican National Committee, according to party sources. The announcement will be made today in Austin, Texas, sources in Richmond said. Gilmore's selection must be ratified by the RNC next month.
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NEWS
December 1, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and MARK Z. BARABAK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Republican Chairman James S. Gilmore on Friday announced plans to quit his post, following two key GOP losses last month and amid worsening relations with White House political operatives. Gilmore, whose term as governor of Virginia also is ending, said he will leave the helm of the Republican National Committee in January to reduce the burden that travel placed on his family. Others said clashes with White House political counselor Karl Rove influenced his decision.
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NEWS
March 21, 2001 | From Reuters
Virginia Gov. James S. Gilmore, under pressure from civil rights leaders who last year threatened a statewide tourism boycott, Tuesday scrapped a tradition of declaring April "Confederate History Month" in the commonwealth. In a move that drew protests from descendants of Confederate soldiers, Gilmore designated April as the "Month for Remembrance of the Sacrifices and Honor of All Virginians Who Served in the Civil War."
NEWS
March 21, 2001 | From Reuters
Virginia Gov. James S. Gilmore, under pressure from civil rights leaders who last year threatened a statewide tourism boycott, Tuesday scrapped a tradition of declaring April "Confederate History Month" in the commonwealth. In a move that drew protests from descendants of Confederate soldiers, Gilmore designated April as the "Month for Remembrance of the Sacrifices and Honor of All Virginians Who Served in the Civil War."
NEWS
December 1, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and MARK Z. BARABAK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Republican Chairman James S. Gilmore on Friday announced plans to quit his post, following two key GOP losses last month and amid worsening relations with White House political operatives. Gilmore, whose term as governor of Virginia also is ending, said he will leave the helm of the Republican National Committee in January to reduce the burden that travel placed on his family. Others said clashes with White House political counselor Karl Rove influenced his decision.
NEWS
September 12, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
DNA tests sought by a Virginia death row inmate hoping to avert his execution Thursday may instead have sealed his fate by confirming that his blood was under the victim's fingernails. Virginia Gov. James S. Gilmore rejected the clemency petition of condemned murderer Derek Barnabei, 33, citing DNA tests on fingernail clippings taken seven years ago from the body of Barnabei's 17-year-old girlfriend, Sarah Wisnosky.
NEWS
May 3, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Gov. James S. Gilmore signed a bill eliminating Virginia's strict deadline for inmates to produce new genetic evidence of their innocence. The previous limit, giving inmates only 21 days after sentencing to bring up new evidence, was the nation's most restrictive. The new law contains no limit on the time required to produce new DNA evidence. Gilmore, a Republican who took office in 1998, had wanted inmates to have three years after sentencing to bring up new evidence on genetic testing.
NEWS
April 14, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright asked Virginia's governor to block today's execution of a death-row inmate from Paraguay, saying she was concerned about the "potential harm" to Americans abroad. Albright made the request in a letter to Virginia Gov. James S. Gilmore. A spokesman said the governor was reviewing the request.
NEWS
February 7, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The Virginia Senate passed a bill to require women seeking abortions to wait 24 hours after seeing a doctor before the procedure can be performed. The measure has passed the state House, and Gov. James S. Gilmore has said he will sign it into law. Supporters said it would not restrict a woman's choice but rather would provide her with a right to fully understand what abortion means.
NEWS
November 12, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Elizabeth Hanford Dole's hopes for the Republican Senate nomination in North Carolina brightened last week. Former Charlotte Mayor Richard Vinroot, who had vowed to fight her for the prize, gave up his bid and endorsed Dole. "This is a necessary sacrifice for the good of our party, our state and our nation," said Vinroot. Vinroot announced his decision after Republican National Committee Chairman and Virginia Gov. James S. Gilmore urged him to step aside in a Nov. 3 telephone call.
NEWS
December 22, 2000 | From the Washington Post
President-elect George W. Bush has picked Virginia Gov. James S. Gilmore, a tough-minded, tax-cutting conservative with a talent for raising money, to become the chairman of the Republican National Committee, according to party sources. The announcement will be made today in Austin, Texas, sources in Richmond said. Gilmore's selection must be ratified by the RNC next month.
NEWS
March 17, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Lonnie Weeks Jr., who killed a Virginia state trooper in 1993, was executed by lethal injection in Jarratt, Va., despite pleas for clemency from Amnesty International and the slain trooper's children, a prison spokesman said. Weeks, 28, was put to death after Virginia Gov. James S. Gilmore dismissed a final clemency plea and the U.S. Supreme Court--which stayed Weeks' execution last year less than two hours before he was to die--rejected a last-ditch appeal.
NEWS
November 15, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Gov. James S. Gilmore and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s widow dedicated a tree and a flat, granite marker to the slain civil rights leader about 100 feet from the spot where Jefferson Davis was inaugurated as the Confederacy's president. "This tree is strong. Oak trees represent strength, and my husband certainly had plenty of that," Coretta Scott King said after a brief ceremony in Richmond on the grounds of the Capitol that was the seat of the Confederate government from 1862 to 1865.
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