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James S Riepe

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BUSINESS
October 14, 2004 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Investment Company Institute, the mutual fund industry's chief trade group, said its board elected James S. Riepe, vice chairman of T. Rowe Price Group Inc., as chairman for a one-year term. Riepe succeeds Paul G. Haaga Jr., executive vice president of Los Angeles-based Capital Research and Management, the parent of the American Funds group. Haaga served two one-year terms as chairman of the Washington-based group.
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BUSINESS
October 14, 2004 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Investment Company Institute, the mutual fund industry's chief trade group, said its board elected James S. Riepe, vice chairman of T. Rowe Price Group Inc., as chairman for a one-year term. Riepe succeeds Paul G. Haaga Jr., executive vice president of Los Angeles-based Capital Research and Management, the parent of the American Funds group. Haaga served two one-year terms as chairman of the Washington-based group.
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BUSINESS
May 10, 1994 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A mutual fund industry organization proposed Monday to sharply limit personal investing by fund managers, a plan prompted by recent complaints that some managers may have feathered their own nests in conflict with the best interests of their funds. But the six-member advisory group of the Washington-based Investment Company Institute stopped short of calling for a total ban on personal investing by fund managers, which a number of the industry's critics have advocated.
BUSINESS
May 7, 1990 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They are the financial equivalent of the Hula-Hoop or the pet rock--investments that capture the hearts and pocketbooks of the masses before fading into relative obscurity. Let's call them fads. From the birth control boom in the early 1960s to today's "green" investments, the financial landscape is frequently littered with products that cater to the latest social or economic trends. But fads are risky. Investors sometimes can reap double-digit returns in just a matter of months.
BUSINESS
October 17, 1987 | BILL SING
Bob Dolan loves municipal bonds and their exemption from federal tax. But the Redwood City, Calif., executive--like thousands of other investors--took a bath last April and May when muni prices plummeted as much as 15% due to rising interest rates. "I think the volatility of munis is a much bigger issue than their tax significance," Dolan said. "Municipal bonds can be almost as volatile, if not more volatile, than stocks."
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