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James Salter

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NEWS
March 4, 2013 | By Joy Press
Tom McCarthy and James Salter are among the winners of the inaugural Donald Windham-Sandy M. Campbell Literature Prizes, announced Monday at Yale University's Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library. Although the Windham-Campbell joins a crowded literary award field, it sets itself apart by its sheer size: Each prize is $150,000. The global prizes are given to "English-language writers at all stages of their careers for outstanding achievement in the fields of fiction, non-fiction and drama," according to a Yale news release.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
2013 was a very good year for writers with many years behind them. When she was 81 years old, author Alice Munro published her 16th short story collection, "Dear Life," and told Canadian news outlets that she was done with writing. At 82, after she won the 2013 Nobel Prize for Literature, Munro admitted she might not be ready to quit after all. "I have promised to retire but now and then I get an idea," she told the Wall Street Journal. Writing is an art that, with persistent ideas and enduring talent, can be carried on for a lifetime.
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BOOKS
January 14, 2001 | BENJAMIN KUNKEL, Benjamin Kunkel is a writer who contributes to several publications, including The Nation and The Village Voice
James Salter's new novel about a doomed or unlucky young pilot does what none of its characters can: It performs a rescue mission and healingly alters the past. "Cassada," Salter's sixth novel, was also his second, "The Arm of Flesh," "published," the author says, "in 1961 and largely a failure." "The Arm of Flesh" flashed across the sky, turned a few critics' heads and vanished. It has never been reprinted.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
One of the literary world's favorite fiction prizes, the PEN/Faulkner award , announced its 2013 finalists Wednesday. In its 33rd year, the contenders come from publishers large and small. The finalists are Amelia Gray for "Threats," published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux; "Kind One" by Laird Hunt and T. Geronimo Johnson's "Hold It 'Til It Hurts," both published by Coffee House Press; "Watergate" by Thomas Mallon, published by Pantheon; and Benjamin Alire Sáenz for "Everything Begins & Ends at the Kentucky Club," published by Cinco Puntos Press.
NEWS
April 28, 1989
A panel of American writers today named James Salter winner of the ninth annual PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction for his 1988 collection of short stories, "Dusk" (North Point Press). Salter, 63, grew up in New York where he still lives. He is the author of five novels written between 1957 and 1979--"The Hunters", "The Arm of Flesh," "A Sport and a Pastime," "Light Years" and "Solo Faces." His short stories were first published in the Paris Review in the 1960s. "Dusk" is his first collection of short fiction.
BOOKS
March 23, 1986 | Elizabeth Benedict, Benedict's first novel, "Slow Dancing," was nominated for the 1985 L.A. Times Fiction Prize and The American Book Award. and
Admirers of James Salter's fiction speak of it reverently, with delicacy, almost in awe. He writes about the fragility of things--families, love, sexuality, success--in prose that is as careful and light as a structure made of eggshells. Of his five novels, "A Sport and a Pastime" is among the best known, along with the more mature "Light Years" (1975) and "Solo Faces" (1979).
BOOKS
May 1, 2005 | Jane Ciabattari, Jane Ciabattari is the author of the short story collection "Stealing the Fire."
James SALTER spent his formative years as a writer serving in the Army Air Forces as a fighter pilot. His first novel, "The Hunters" (1957), describes dogfights over the Yalu River during the Korean War. Salter, a West Point graduate who flew about 100 missions, is well-acquainted with the fathomless sky, the play of light upon water, Earth and skin, the vicious, split-second turn of fate that can snuff out a life.
NEWS
September 3, 1997 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some interviews begin long before one sits down with the subject. In the decades that he has been writing novels, stories and various New Yorker pieces, James Salter has placed before us a way of living in which all the senses are open, novels through which one repeatedly asks oneself: This is fun but can it last? This is exciting but does it matter? This is beautiful but is it essential?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Snakewoman of Little Egypt A Novel Robert Hellenga Bloomsbury USA: 342 pp., $25 Blend one anthropologist (Jackson), one young woman fresh out of prison for shooting and injuring her husband (Sunny), and that husband, a Pentecostal pastor from a serpent-handling church (Earl) and watch their lives twist around one another in utterly unpredictable ways. You are in Hellengaville, searching for your lost shaker of angst. Robert Hellenga's characters perpetually reenter the world, reinvent themselves, reconnect with one another in new ways.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2005 | Hillel Italie, Associated Press
Bookshelves can be found throughout James Salter's house, arranged alphabetically and by subject matter. When the author's eye happens to fall upon the fiction section, letter "S," he will on occasion give in and reach for one of his own novels. "I might say, 'Ah, here's "Light Years." Let's have a look.' And I turn to a page and I might read three to four pages, hoping to be filled with satisfaction," he explains.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2013 | By David Ng
The Windham-Campbell Prizes, a new literary award from Yale University, has announced its inaugural roster of winners. Among the nine recipients are three playwrights -- Naomi Wallace, Stephen Adly Guirgis and Tarell Alvin McCraney. Each winner receives a monetary award of $150,000. The honors will be handed out at a ceremony scheduled for Sept. 10. The prize is administered by the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library at Yale. It is named after Donald Windham, who along with his partner, Sandy M. Campbell, donated money for the creation of the prize.
NEWS
March 4, 2013 | By Joy Press
Tom McCarthy and James Salter are among the winners of the inaugural Donald Windham-Sandy M. Campbell Literature Prizes, announced Monday at Yale University's Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library. Although the Windham-Campbell joins a crowded literary award field, it sets itself apart by its sheer size: Each prize is $150,000. The global prizes are given to "English-language writers at all stages of their careers for outstanding achievement in the fields of fiction, non-fiction and drama," according to a Yale news release.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Snakewoman of Little Egypt A Novel Robert Hellenga Bloomsbury USA: 342 pp., $25 Blend one anthropologist (Jackson), one young woman fresh out of prison for shooting and injuring her husband (Sunny), and that husband, a Pentecostal pastor from a serpent-handling church (Earl) and watch their lives twist around one another in utterly unpredictable ways. You are in Hellengaville, searching for your lost shaker of angst. Robert Hellenga's characters perpetually reenter the world, reinvent themselves, reconnect with one another in new ways.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2005 | Hillel Italie, Associated Press
Bookshelves can be found throughout James Salter's house, arranged alphabetically and by subject matter. When the author's eye happens to fall upon the fiction section, letter "S," he will on occasion give in and reach for one of his own novels. "I might say, 'Ah, here's "Light Years." Let's have a look.' And I turn to a page and I might read three to four pages, hoping to be filled with satisfaction," he explains.
BOOKS
May 1, 2005 | Jane Ciabattari, Jane Ciabattari is the author of the short story collection "Stealing the Fire."
James SALTER spent his formative years as a writer serving in the Army Air Forces as a fighter pilot. His first novel, "The Hunters" (1957), describes dogfights over the Yalu River during the Korean War. Salter, a West Point graduate who flew about 100 missions, is well-acquainted with the fathomless sky, the play of light upon water, Earth and skin, the vicious, split-second turn of fate that can snuff out a life.
BOOKS
January 14, 2001 | BENJAMIN KUNKEL, Benjamin Kunkel is a writer who contributes to several publications, including The Nation and The Village Voice
James Salter's new novel about a doomed or unlucky young pilot does what none of its characters can: It performs a rescue mission and healingly alters the past. "Cassada," Salter's sixth novel, was also his second, "The Arm of Flesh," "published," the author says, "in 1961 and largely a failure." "The Arm of Flesh" flashed across the sky, turned a few critics' heads and vanished. It has never been reprinted.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
2013 was a very good year for writers with many years behind them. When she was 81 years old, author Alice Munro published her 16th short story collection, "Dear Life," and told Canadian news outlets that she was done with writing. At 82, after she won the 2013 Nobel Prize for Literature, Munro admitted she might not be ready to quit after all. "I have promised to retire but now and then I get an idea," she told the Wall Street Journal. Writing is an art that, with persistent ideas and enduring talent, can be carried on for a lifetime.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
One of the literary world's favorite fiction prizes, the PEN/Faulkner award , announced its 2013 finalists Wednesday. In its 33rd year, the contenders come from publishers large and small. The finalists are Amelia Gray for "Threats," published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux; "Kind One" by Laird Hunt and T. Geronimo Johnson's "Hold It 'Til It Hurts," both published by Coffee House Press; "Watergate" by Thomas Mallon, published by Pantheon; and Benjamin Alire Sáenz for "Everything Begins & Ends at the Kentucky Club," published by Cinco Puntos Press.
NEWS
September 3, 1997 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some interviews begin long before one sits down with the subject. In the decades that he has been writing novels, stories and various New Yorker pieces, James Salter has placed before us a way of living in which all the senses are open, novels through which one repeatedly asks oneself: This is fun but can it last? This is exciting but does it matter? This is beautiful but is it essential?
BOOKS
August 31, 1997 | RICHARD EDER
Not "Recollections." Not "A Recollection." Simply "Recollection," as a man might say, "Death," "Loss," "Sorrow" for a penitential phenomenon he grits his teeth to face. James Salter's memoir is written uphill, an account delivered not to himself but, as if concealing assets, to the autobiographical equivalent of a tax audit. Remembering can be treacherous; it means launching oneself in a raft upon a powerful current to the past. Salter's raft is equipped with steering gear and reverse thrusters.
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