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James Schamus

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BUSINESS
May 20, 2006 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
In the world of specialty films, success often comes in pairs. Harvey and Bob Weinstein built Miramax into an indie powerhouse. Sony Pictures Classics, which puts more foreign films into theaters than any other distributor, is run by Tom Bernard and Michael Barker. Then there are James Schamus and David Linde, whose four years at the helm of Focus Features, Universal Pictures' specialized film label, culminated with the 2005 hit "Brokeback Mountain."
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NEWS
November 22, 2006 | James Bates, Times Staff Writer
As chief executive of Universal's Focus Features, James Schamus knows firsthand what his awards nominees feel because he's been there himself. Schamus' longtime collaboration with director Ang Lee gave him best screenplay and best song nominations for "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon," and a best picture nomination in last year's Oscars for "Brokeback Mountain." He lost each time.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1999
Your profile of Taiwanese film director Ang Lee ("Ang Lee Braves New Territory," by John Clark, Sept. 18) quotes James Schamus, Lee's producing partner, as saying that he begins every interview by asking Lee, "Ang Lee, you're a yellow, Asian guy. How is it possible that you can make movies about white people?" I realize that Schamus is mocking whites who would ask such a question, and that Lee's correct response is, more or less, that while cultures may differ, personal experiences and emotions can be quite similar.
BUSINESS
May 20, 2006 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
In the world of specialty films, success often comes in pairs. Harvey and Bob Weinstein built Miramax into an indie powerhouse. Sony Pictures Classics, which puts more foreign films into theaters than any other distributor, is run by Tom Bernard and Michael Barker. Then there are James Schamus and David Linde, whose four years at the helm of Focus Features, Universal Pictures' specialized film label, culminated with the 2005 hit "Brokeback Mountain."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1999 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
It's been decades since the phrase "Bleeding Kansas" and the dark figure of pro-Confederate raider William C. Quantrill, mentor to outlaws Frank and Jesse James and Cole Younger, were familiar on-screen presences. But once upon a time TV westerns and even B-pictures like "Dark Command," "Kansas Raiders" and "Quantrill's Raiders" often focused on this bloody sideshow of the Civil War, with friends fighting friends in vicious guerrilla warfare along the Kansas-Missouri border.
NEWS
November 22, 2006 | James Bates, Times Staff Writer
As chief executive of Universal's Focus Features, James Schamus knows firsthand what his awards nominees feel because he's been there himself. Schamus' longtime collaboration with director Ang Lee gave him best screenplay and best song nominations for "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon," and a best picture nomination in last year's Oscars for "Brokeback Mountain." He lost each time.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2004 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
In Hollywood there is no shortage of strange bedfellows. But could it be that the same people who brought you "The Pianist" and "Lost in Translation" are behind a B-level horror movie about a homicidal redheaded doll? Indeed, come Nov. 12, "Seed of Chucky" will be playing in a theater near you, courtesy of Rogue Pictures, the genre label Focus Features launched earlier this year.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Universal Pictures said it was combining its international production group with its specialty film label, Focus Features, to create a single entity overseen by Focus Chief Executive James Schamus and Christian Grass, who heads Universal Pictures International Production in London. The studio said the consolidation was intended to extend Focus' brand, known for such films as "Milk" and "Brokeback Mountain," and make it easier for filmmakers to finance, produce and distribute movies in local and foreign markets.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2006 | From the Associated Press
"Brokeback Mountain" co-star Randy Quaid has dropped a lawsuit over his compensation for the Academy Award-winning film. Quaid had sued Focus Features and producers David Linde and James Schamus in March, claiming he was fleeced into working cheaply by the filmmakers' assertion that "Brokeback Mountain" was "a low-budget, art-house film, with no prospect of making any money."
BUSINESS
May 3, 2002 | Richard Verrier
As part of a reorganization of its specialty film business, Universal Studios said Thursday that it will acquire Good Machine, a highly successful producer of independent films, including Ang Lee's hit "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon." Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed. Good Machine principals David Linde and James Schamus, based in New York, would manage the new specialty film unit, to be called Focus, reporting to Universal Pictures chief Stacey Snider.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2004 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
In Hollywood there is no shortage of strange bedfellows. But could it be that the same people who brought you "The Pianist" and "Lost in Translation" are behind a B-level horror movie about a homicidal redheaded doll? Indeed, come Nov. 12, "Seed of Chucky" will be playing in a theater near you, courtesy of Rogue Pictures, the genre label Focus Features launched earlier this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1999 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
It's been decades since the phrase "Bleeding Kansas" and the dark figure of pro-Confederate raider William C. Quantrill, mentor to outlaws Frank and Jesse James and Cole Younger, were familiar on-screen presences. But once upon a time TV westerns and even B-pictures like "Dark Command," "Kansas Raiders" and "Quantrill's Raiders" often focused on this bloody sideshow of the Civil War, with friends fighting friends in vicious guerrilla warfare along the Kansas-Missouri border.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1999
Your profile of Taiwanese film director Ang Lee ("Ang Lee Braves New Territory," by John Clark, Sept. 18) quotes James Schamus, Lee's producing partner, as saying that he begins every interview by asking Lee, "Ang Lee, you're a yellow, Asian guy. How is it possible that you can make movies about white people?" I realize that Schamus is mocking whites who would ask such a question, and that Lee's correct response is, more or less, that while cultures may differ, personal experiences and emotions can be quite similar.
BUSINESS
January 18, 2004
Michael Cieply and James Bates made passing reference to a New Yorker article on the "Hulk" screenplay credit arbitration ("Legal Clash Over 'Samurai' Credit," Jan. 6). The article repeats James Schamus' contention that he was responsible for everything in the final script that wasn't drawn from the comic book source but wound up sharing credit with myself and Michael France, who had written earlier drafts. This is a misapprehension of the facts. It also implies that the "Hulk" arbitration was somehow analogous to the "Samurai" dispute.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2007 | Robert W. Welkos
Oscar-winning director Ang Lee's erotic espionage thriller, "Lust, Caution," has been given an NC-17 rating by the Motion Picture Assn. of America, signaling to parents that the film may be inappropriate for audiences 17 and under, and restricting admission to only those 18 and older. The film earned the MPAA's strict rating because of "some explicit sexuality."
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