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James Sherwood

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BUSINESS
January 9, 1990 | From Associated Press
The Copacabana Palace Hotel, a Rio landmark that once hosted European royalty and Hollywood movie stars but fell on hard times, has been taken over by the American businessman who restored Europe's Orient Express train. "The Copa," on Rio's famous Copacabana Beach on the South Atlantic coast, has been declining for more than 20 years. But James Sherwood has pledged to restore the hotel's glory.
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BUSINESS
January 9, 1990 | From Associated Press
The Copacabana Palace Hotel, a Rio landmark that once hosted European royalty and Hollywood movie stars but fell on hard times, has been taken over by the American businessman who restored Europe's Orient Express train. "The Copa," on Rio's famous Copacabana Beach on the South Atlantic coast, has been declining for more than 20 years. But James Sherwood has pledged to restore the hotel's glory.
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BUSINESS
January 3, 1986
The New York-based hotel, retail and real estate firm revealed that the Internal Revenue Service wants the firm to pay the $105 million, plus penalties and interest, for unpaid taxes from 1976 to 1981. Company President James Sherwood said the IRS claims that Seaco allowed another company to use some of its assets without proper compensation and now wants Seaco to pay taxes on the profits earned from those assets. Seaco said it would contest the claim, calling it "altogether unprecedented."
BUSINESS
November 12, 1995 | From Bloomberg Business News
Honor, adventure and sufficient income was in the air of Twenty-One. --Norman Mailer, from his book "Harlot's Ghost" * After Michael Lomonaco prepared a meal for Ronald Reagan many years ago, he showed the former U.S. President his Screen Actors Guild card. Reagan, who headed the organization before starting a career in politics, shook his head and quipped: "I guess we both got better jobs." To say the least.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2007 | Sharon Bernstein and Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writers
With half of California's navel orange crop destroyed by a cold snap, the wholesale price of the fruit soared Tuesday as agriculture officials warned that consumers will soon be paying more for other produce such as avocados, carrots and lettuce. Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger declared a state of emergency Tuesday in the 10 counties hardest hit -- even as state officials predicted that the frigid temperatures would continue in many agriculture zones through the weekend.
NEWS
March 17, 1985 | JODY JACOBS
Former songbird Jane Morgan Weintraub and her husband, Jerry, the producer, are the couple being honored at the National Art Assn.'s 15th Orchid Ball. Always a spectacularly beautiful event, we're told this 15th annual event will be absolutely breathtaking. And we believe it. Massed around the Grand Ballroom of the Beverly Wilshire on the night of April 19 will be sprays of orchids from Australia, Japan, Hawaii, South America and here and there in the United States.
TRAVEL
January 19, 1986 | HORACE SUTTON, Sutton is editor of Signature magazine. and
What the well-informed wayfarer afoot in the great cities of the world really needs is a guide to all things called Cipriani, a name appended to hotels, bars and restaurants. An accompanying lexicon could define watering holes called Harry's Bar: which ones are real and which got in on a popular but uncopyrighted name.
IMAGE
November 28, 2010 | By Emili Vesilind, Special to the Los Angeles Times
IPads, Nooks and Kindles may be topping wish lists this holiday season, but when it comes to reading about fashion, nothing beats the glossy, full-color grandeur of a coffee-table book. This season's crop of oversized style tomes is especially alluring. Among them are memoir-esque reads, playfully pedantic books on how to hone personal style and a pair of opulent tomes focusing on men's fashion, encompassing styles from cowboy chic to Savile Row sleek. Of course, you won't be packing these biceps-building books for your next red eye. But then not all reading has to be on the run. Curling up in front of the fire with a big juicy traditional book is a great way to take a break from the holiday season hubbub.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2002 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Frederick Knott, a playwright whose short but admirable string of credits included two long-running Broadway shows -- "Dial M for Murder" in 1952 and "Wait Until Dark" in 1966 -- died of undisclosed causes Tuesday at his home in New York City. He was 86. Knott wrote only three plays, but all were successful. "Dial M" was a thriller about a woman who slowly comes to realize that her husband is plotting her death.
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