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ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2010 | By Kevin Thomas
Director Quentin Lee continues to explore the Asian American experience in his fourth feature, "The People I've Slept With," a saucy comedy that deftly turns serious. As in such films as "Shopping for Fangs," which took an amused look at sex and materialism in upscale suburbia, and "Ethan Mao," in which a gay youth copes with his ultra-traditional, homophobic family, Lee finds the universal in the particular: You don't have to be Asian to identify with his people and their predicaments.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2010 | By Kevin Thomas
Director Quentin Lee continues to explore the Asian American experience in his fourth feature, "The People I've Slept With," a saucy comedy that deftly turns serious. As in such films as "Shopping for Fangs," which took an amused look at sex and materialism in upscale suburbia, and "Ethan Mao," in which a gay youth copes with his ultra-traditional, homophobic family, Lee finds the universal in the particular: You don't have to be Asian to identify with his people and their predicaments.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2009 | Dennis Lim
Samuel Fuller was a director with a signature style: blunt verging on brutal, partial to shock cuts and mega close-ups. As a screenwriter, this former crime reporter was no less distinctive, favoring hot-button issues and hard-boiled repartee. A superb new seven-disc set, "The Samuel Fuller Collection" ($79.95, Sony, out Tuesday), which contains two films written and directed by Fuller and five earlier efforts on which he has a writing or story credit, is an intriguing auteurist study that shows the Fuller personality both as the driving force of a film and as an (often powerful)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2009 | Dennis Lim
Samuel Fuller was a director with a signature style: blunt verging on brutal, partial to shock cuts and mega close-ups. As a screenwriter, this former crime reporter was no less distinctive, favoring hot-button issues and hard-boiled repartee. A superb new seven-disc set, "The Samuel Fuller Collection" ($79.95, Sony, out Tuesday), which contains two films written and directed by Fuller and five earlier efforts on which he has a writing or story credit, is an intriguing auteurist study that shows the Fuller personality both as the driving force of a film and as an (often powerful)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2004 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
Nancy Kwan sat behind a desk on the stage of the David Henry Hwang Theatre, gazing at James Shigeta to her right. He kept his eyes on the script as he read from A.R. Gurney's "Love Letters." But Kwan didn't look away from Shigeta as they prepared for two readings of the play Saturday, benefiting East West Players. There was a logical explanation for why she looked at him but he didn't look at her. He was reading words of love from his character to Kwan's -- after Kwan's character has died.
NEWS
December 22, 1990
Gwendolyn Harold Terasaki, 84, whose book "Bridge to the Sun" became a best seller and a 1961 movie, starring Carroll Baker and James Shigeta. Mrs. Terasaki, a native of Johnson City, Tenn., married Japanese diplomat Hidenari Terasaki in 1931. After Pearl Harbor the couple spent World War II in Tokyo, and "Bridge to the Sun," published in 1957, detailed the family's wartime experiences from a pro-Japanese point of view. On Saturday in Casper, Wyo.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1989 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
An exceptionally stylish and dynamic martial-arts movie, "Cage" (citywide) takes its title from an enclosed and padlocked ring in which two men square off. No weapons are allowed, and it is not unusual for the matches to end in the death of one of the combatants. Huge sums of money are wagered on these illegal contests, which the film's writer Hugh Kelley, a martial-arts champion himself, claims to have observed in Hong Kong and other foreign cities.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2006 | Michael Ordona, Special to The Times
It may rarely occur to most moviegoers that Asian men tend to appear in a limited spectrum of roles, when they appear at all. And that's the problem. For those who do think about such things, "The Slanted Screen" contains little new information. But to the presumed majority, this slick, intelligent documentary may be a revelation.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2002
Nancy Kwan recalls that the 1961 film version of the Rodgers & Hammerstein musical "Flower Drum Song" was such a big hit with audiences, "I used to go to Chinese restaurants and get Chinese for free all the time! It was very well-received. We were very proud because it was an all-Asian cast and it made money." Kwan, a vivacious 62, played Linda Low, a beautiful and ambitious performer in a Chinatown nightclub in San Francisco.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2004 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
Nancy Kwan sat behind a desk on the stage of the David Henry Hwang Theatre, gazing at James Shigeta to her right. He kept his eyes on the script as he read from A.R. Gurney's "Love Letters." But Kwan didn't look away from Shigeta as they prepared for two readings of the play Saturday, benefiting East West Players. There was a logical explanation for why she looked at him but he didn't look at her. He was reading words of love from his character to Kwan's -- after Kwan's character has died.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2001 | GENE SEYMOUR, NEWSDAY
Here's a theory. It's neither profound nor new, but take it for what it's worth: Gangsters by themselves don't make up the main reason people are drawn to gangster movies. Rather, people go to such films to see mundane business practices carried to extremes. "Why?" you ask. Maybe because it throws a tawdry glamour into their own lives and careers. Or perhaps because it gives them ideas on how to carry out difficult day-to-day transactions.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1990 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"China Cry" (selected theaters), the first theatrical production from the Trinity Broadcasting Network, a Christian organization, is a stirring, large-scale epic--and a romantic love story as well--based on San Jose evangelist Nora Lam's early life and long ordeal as a Christian in Communist China.
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