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James Spinosa

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BUSINESS
August 5, 2000 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A veteran dockworker and labor official from Los Angeles was elected Friday to head the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, among the nation's most powerful labor organizations and one that is facing a range of difficult technological issues on the West Coast. James Spinosa, 59, defeated incumbent Brian McWilliams for president of the San Francisco-based union, which has about 60,000 members in Alaska, California, Oregon, Washington, Hawaii and Canada.
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BUSINESS
August 5, 2000 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A veteran dockworker and labor official from Los Angeles was elected Friday to head the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, among the nation's most powerful labor organizations and one that is facing a range of difficult technological issues on the West Coast. James Spinosa, 59, defeated incumbent Brian McWilliams for president of the San Francisco-based union, which has about 60,000 members in Alaska, California, Oregon, Washington, Hawaii and Canada.
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BUSINESS
November 7, 2004
I was amazed at the logic expressed by James Spinosa in "Port Complex Is Far From Being Shipshape" (Oct. 21). When talking about labor at the docks, he noted that the port authority should promote 1,000 of the people to union status so that there would be more skilled workers. You mean to tell me that when the workers go home and are promoted to union status, they are more skilled when they come to work the next morning? Evert DeWyn Chino
BUSINESS
October 26, 2002 | Nancy Cleeland
Longshore union officials denied they were violating court orders by orchestrating slowdowns at West Coast docks, and told the Justice Department that the blame for continuing backlogs of cargo lies with the shipping lines. "The fact is our workers are ready, willing and able to work," said James Spinosa, president of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, which has been in contract talks with the Pacific Maritime Assn., representing the shipping industry.
BUSINESS
December 13, 2002 | Nancy Cleeland, Times Staff Writer
Representatives of all dockworker union locals on the West Coast approved Thursday a tentative six-year labor contract, sending the pact to the general membership for a final vote. The contract between the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and the shipping industry's Pacific Maritime Assn. was hammered out after six months of bitter negotiations punctuated by work slowdowns and a 10-day employer lockout.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2002 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Contract negotiations between West Coast dockworkers and shipping lines resumed Tuesday in San Francisco, with officials from both sides aiming potshots at each other over a union proposal for port security. The bargaining session was only the second since late July, and both sides acknowledged that they made little headway on the thorniest issue: how to incorporate labor-saving technology and make the docks run more efficiently without gutting union jobs.
BUSINESS
July 27, 2002 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Contract negotiations covering about 10,000 West Coast dockworkers grew increasingly tense Friday as the union suspended talks for nearly three weeks and, for the first time, officially broached the possibility of a strike. Representatives of West Coast locals transferred the power to call for a strike vote to the negotiating committee--strengthening that panel's bargaining clout. The change is incremental, and union officials insist they have no plans to shut down the ports.
BUSINESS
November 2, 2002 | Nancy Cleeland, Times Staff Writer
The longshore union and the shipping industry reached a tentative agreement on labor-saving technology -- the stickiest issue in their prolonged dispute -- Friday after all-night talks with three federal mediators and a top AFL-CIO official. No details were released on the deal, which both sides saw as a breakthrough in the stalemate that has disrupted commercial trade at West Coast ports for more than a month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2002 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 1,500 dockworkers held a boisterous rally Thursday a few yards from the opening-day celebration at Maersk Sealand's sprawling Pier 400 in the Port of Los Angeles. The groups were separated by a long wall of 40-foot cargo containers apparently erected by Maersk so invited foreign dignitaries and local officials would not catch sight of the union activity. Not to be ignored, the union members, locked in labor talks with the Pacific Maritime Assn., repeatedly shouted, "No contract, no peace!"
BUSINESS
September 14, 2002 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several national labor leaders will meet in San Francisco on Sunday hoping to quietly settle a dispute that threatens union solidarity on the West Coast waterfront. The private meeting is set to bring together the presidents of the dockworkers and machinists unions, with AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer Richard Trumka mediating.
BUSINESS
August 20, 2004 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
In an atmosphere resembling a low-budget game show, the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach began the process Thursday of turning more than 300,000 applications from around the world into 3,000 high-paying dockside jobs. Inside an auditorium at the L.A. port's administration building, a bin the size of a small school bus held hundreds of thousands of postcards mailed from across the nation and countries as distant as Serbia, Australia and Singapore.
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