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James Squires

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NEWS
February 9, 1993
I have comments to make about your Jan. 26 article " 'Read All About It' Prints the Bad News" about author James Squires' new book. Any newspaper that isn't profitable will not be as credible to its readers as a profitable paper. Nothing will ever replace the newspapers' ability to gather news and information. Only the dissemination will change. There will be ex-editors, like Squires, who will criticize newspapers' presentation of the news. After all, he was the editor at the Chicago Tribune when it was a truly dull gray newspaper.
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BOOKS
February 21, 1993 | Robert Sherrill, Sherrill, a magazine writer, is biased because he is condemned daily to reading a Knight-Ridder newspaper, one of Wall Street's undead
James D. Squires used to be the whiz-bang editor of the Chicago Tribune (the paper won seven Pulitzers in the nearly nine years he was there) and was more recently Ross Perot's press adviser. He believes that traditional U.S. journalism is dying of greed. You may have heard executives in newspaper boardrooms moaning about the "depression." Save your sympathy.
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NEWS
June 17, 1992 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Ross Perot is depending heavily on a troika of advisers who helped his political fortunes get off to a booming start and who, like the prospective candidate, have never been on the inside of a presidential campaign. The lead man among the three is Dallas lawyer Tom Luce. His partners are longtime Perot business associate Mort H. Meyerson and former journalist James Squires. Even the recently announced hiring of veteran political professionals Edward J.
NEWS
February 9, 1993
I have comments to make about your Jan. 26 article " 'Read All About It' Prints the Bad News" about author James Squires' new book. Any newspaper that isn't profitable will not be as credible to its readers as a profitable paper. Nothing will ever replace the newspapers' ability to gather news and information. Only the dissemination will change. There will be ex-editors, like Squires, who will criticize newspapers' presentation of the news. After all, he was the editor at the Chicago Tribune when it was a truly dull gray newspaper.
NEWS
January 26, 1993 | BOB SIPCHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
J oey Buttafuoco! Bimbo eruptions! In this story! So please don't get impatient, even if you are among the new breed of citizens that James Squires says has little use for the important but rather difficult information this story attempts to convey. You, after all, are exactly the sort of reader that the veteran newspaper editor most needs to convince that traditional journalism shouldn't be allowed to die.
BOOKS
February 21, 1993 | Robert Sherrill, Sherrill, a magazine writer, is biased because he is condemned daily to reading a Knight-Ridder newspaper, one of Wall Street's undead
James D. Squires used to be the whiz-bang editor of the Chicago Tribune (the paper won seven Pulitzers in the nearly nine years he was there) and was more recently Ross Perot's press adviser. He believes that traditional U.S. journalism is dying of greed. You may have heard executives in newspaper boardrooms moaning about the "depression." Save your sympathy.
NEWS
December 10, 1989 | United Press International
Chicago Tribune Editor James D. Squires announced his resignation Friday, effective Jan. 1, 1990. No successor was named immediately.
NEWS
June 26, 1992 | Associated Press
First Lady Barbara Bush says undeclared presidential candidate Ross Perot once offered her husband "a big job" and his refusal may have triggered bad feeling between the two men. Mrs. Bush, interviewed for ABC's "20/20," said her husband did not consider taking the job. When pressed as to what it was, she said: "I think it was to head his (Perot's) oil company or something (in the late 1970s). Maybe people don't say no to Ross Perot and maybe that's why he feels this way."
NEWS
April 23, 1992 | Associated Press
James D. Squires, former editor of the Chicago Tribune newspaper, has joined the staff of billionaire businessman Ross Perot to handle media operations for Perot's independent presidential campaign. Perot has not yet become a candidate, but has said he will run if his supporters can get his name on presidential ballots in all 50 states. Squires, editor of the Tribune from 1981 to 1989, currently teaches at Middle Tennessee State University.
NEWS
July 7, 1992 | From Associated Press
Undeclared candidate Ross Perot has scheduled a private strategy session with volunteers from across the country and experts interested in his presidential campaign, aides said Monday. The meeting today will help lead to a national advisory committee for the campaign, said spokesman James Squires. "It's private meetings with various people from around the country," Squires said. "It's a combination of things, not just one thing."
NEWS
January 26, 1993 | BOB SIPCHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
J oey Buttafuoco! Bimbo eruptions! In this story! So please don't get impatient, even if you are among the new breed of citizens that James Squires says has little use for the important but rather difficult information this story attempts to convey. You, after all, are exactly the sort of reader that the veteran newspaper editor most needs to convince that traditional journalism shouldn't be allowed to die.
NEWS
June 17, 1992 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Ross Perot is depending heavily on a troika of advisers who helped his political fortunes get off to a booming start and who, like the prospective candidate, have never been on the inside of a presidential campaign. The lead man among the three is Dallas lawyer Tom Luce. His partners are longtime Perot business associate Mort H. Meyerson and former journalist James Squires. Even the recently announced hiring of veteran political professionals Edward J.
BOOKS
July 24, 2005
Liberalism's failure to be heard is due not to corporate ownership but to elitist views like those expressed by James D. Squires in his review of "A Matter of Opinion" by Victor S. Navasky [Book Review, July 10]. As long as liberals continue to characterize those who disagree with them with words like "moronization," blame their impotence on "the dominance of multinational corporations" (as opposed to multinational anti-democratic, anti-capitalist movements?) and believe that politicians need journals of opinion to "know what to think or say," they will continue their self-marginalization.
BUSINESS
December 8, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Chicago Tribune Editor James D. Squires announced his resignation today, effective Jan. 1, 1990. No successor was named immediately. "My decision was made for two reasons--to ease and expedite the transition to a new era of newspaper leadership, begun this time last year, with the appointment of a new president--and to placate my own restless heart," Squires said in a statement. Squires referred to the appointment last year of Tribune President John W. Madigan.
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