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James Stockdale

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1992
I couldn't tell if I was watching a televised debate between Al Gore, James Stockdale and Dan Quayle, or a "Nick at Nite" rerun featuring Superman, Perry White and Jimmy Olsen. EVAN F. McGRATH Mission Hills
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 8, 2012 | By James Rainey
The first rule in picking a vice presidential candidate may be “do no harm.” As Mitt Romney prepares to roll out his pick for No. 2, it's not a bad time to recall all that can go wrong. VP choices can run off the rails from a candidate's native flaws, but at least as often because the teams that nominate them fail to thoroughly investigate for shortcomings or to prepare No. 2 for the withering odyssey of the modern campaign. Here are the six most problematic vice presidential nominations of the last six decades, ranked in reverse order of the least to the most problematic, for the VP pick and the ticket they helped form: 6. Adm. James Stockdale.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2005 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Retired Navy Vice Adm. James B. Stockdale, whose bravery and defiance during 7 1/2 years of brutality as a prisoner of war in North Vietnam gave hope to his fellow prisoners and earned him the Medal of Honor, died Tuesday at his home in Coronado. Stockdale, 81, had battled Alzheimer's disease for several years, the Navy said in announcing his death. Nineteen years after returning home from Vietnam, Stockdale was chosen by third-party candidate H.
OPINION
April 24, 2009
Re "Ship honors Navy hero Stockdale," April 19 The Times mischaracterizes Vice Adm. James Stockdale's 1992 debate performance. Stockdale's famous opening line -- "Who am I? Why am I here?" -- did not "deep[en] [the] impression" that Stockdale was "unprepared and confused." Rather, the opening line was well-received at the time and has generally been regarded as the high point of Stockdale's otherwise poor performance. Jim Lehrer, an old hand at presidential debates, noted as much in 1999 when he said that the line "got great publicity."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1992
I wonder how many of us have similar thoughts on Perot: that he evidently has no aspirations, desire or intent to become President. His quitting was one thing, but no aspiring candidate would ever have put James Stockdale up as a running mate. GEORGE FRENCH Torrance
OPINION
April 24, 2009
Re "Ship honors Navy hero Stockdale," April 19 The Times mischaracterizes Vice Adm. James Stockdale's 1992 debate performance. Stockdale's famous opening line -- "Who am I? Why am I here?" -- did not "deep[en] [the] impression" that Stockdale was "unprepared and confused." Rather, the opening line was well-received at the time and has generally been regarded as the high point of Stockdale's otherwise poor performance. Jim Lehrer, an old hand at presidential debates, noted as much in 1999 when he said that the line "got great publicity."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1992
In response to "Perot Charges Plot Forced Him Out; 'Loony,' GOP Says," Oct. 26, and "Angry Perot Defends Claim of GOP Smear," Oct. 27: The "popular" re-emergence of Ross Perot as a presidential candidate would be a political joke if it did not have such serious implications. Perot's incredible new reasons for his July withdrawal, just publicized, are personal and at wide variance from those more logical reasons expressed previously. Whatever the real reasons for his earlier withdrawal, his re-entry into the campaign has turned out to be less positive a factor than his earlier campaign.
NEWS
July 8, 1993 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Retired Adm. James Stockdale, who ran for vice president last year as Ross Perot's running mate, will return to Vietnam in January for the first time since he was released from a Hanoi prison 20 years ago. The 69-year-old war hero, who as a captain and the highest-ranking Navy prisoner of war was repeatedly tortured, will go to Vietnam this time with his wife, Sybil, and give lectures aboard a cruise ship on a trip sponsored by Stanford University.
NEWS
August 8, 2012 | By James Rainey
The first rule in picking a vice presidential candidate may be “do no harm.” As Mitt Romney prepares to roll out his pick for No. 2, it's not a bad time to recall all that can go wrong. VP choices can run off the rails from a candidate's native flaws, but at least as often because the teams that nominate them fail to thoroughly investigate for shortcomings or to prepare No. 2 for the withering odyssey of the modern campaign. Here are the six most problematic vice presidential nominations of the last six decades, ranked in reverse order of the least to the most problematic, for the VP pick and the ticket they helped form: 6. Adm. James Stockdale.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2009 | Steve Chawkins
As dozens of former POWs snapped to attention, the Navy on Saturday dedicated a warship to the late Vice Adm. James Stockdale, who was credited by many fellow captives in Vietnam with giving them the courage to survive. Stockdale, a soft-spoken scholar best known for his short-lived foray into presidential politics, died at 81 in 2005. He was H. Ross Perot's running mate in 1992 -- but Perot, who spoke at the commissioning, did not mention the campaign.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2005 | From Associated Press
Military officials and family remembered retired Vice Adm. James Stockdale in a tribute memorial Saturday atop the aircraft carrier Ronald Reagan, portraying him as a thoughtful and strong war hero with no mention of his fumbling 1992 campaign for vice president. Stockdale's four sons spoke of his early lectures arguing that "entitlement and privilege corrupt" and of how he valued his wife Sybil's weekly letters while held in a North Vietnamese prison for 7 1/2 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2005 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Retired Navy Vice Adm. James B. Stockdale, whose bravery and defiance during 7 1/2 years of brutality as a prisoner of war in North Vietnam gave hope to his fellow prisoners and earned him the Medal of Honor, died Tuesday at his home in Coronado. Stockdale, 81, had battled Alzheimer's disease for several years, the Navy said in announcing his death. Nineteen years after returning home from Vietnam, Stockdale was chosen by third-party candidate H.
NEWS
July 8, 1993 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Retired Adm. James Stockdale, who ran for vice president last year as Ross Perot's running mate, will return to Vietnam in January for the first time since he was released from a Hanoi prison 20 years ago. The 69-year-old war hero, who as a captain and the highest-ranking Navy prisoner of war was repeatedly tortured, will go to Vietnam this time with his wife, Sybil, and give lectures aboard a cruise ship on a trip sponsored by Stanford University.
NEWS
October 29, 1992 | TIM RUTTEN
It isn't easy to get a one-on-one interview with Ross Perot--unless, of course, you happen to have a television talk show and an 800 number. As an ink-stained wretch, I have neither, although this column is thought to command the loyalty of a small but deeply discontented following. Just the sort of group to which a Perot candidacy might be expected to appeal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1992
In response to "Perot Charges Plot Forced Him Out; 'Loony,' GOP Says," Oct. 26, and "Angry Perot Defends Claim of GOP Smear," Oct. 27: The "popular" re-emergence of Ross Perot as a presidential candidate would be a political joke if it did not have such serious implications. Perot's incredible new reasons for his July withdrawal, just publicized, are personal and at wide variance from those more logical reasons expressed previously. Whatever the real reasons for his earlier withdrawal, his re-entry into the campaign has turned out to be less positive a factor than his earlier campaign.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1992
I wonder how many of us have similar thoughts on Perot: that he evidently has no aspirations, desire or intent to become President. His quitting was one thing, but no aspiring candidate would ever have put James Stockdale up as a running mate. GEORGE FRENCH Torrance
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1992
For months George Bush and Dan Quayle have been asserting that prior military duty is essential to being President of the United States and commander in chief. After watching the vice presidential debate, I think (retired) Vice Adm. Stockdale's abilities to run the nation and the military have seriously damaged that assertion. PHILL COLEMAN Lomita
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