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James Stolpa

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January 8, 1993 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marooned with her baby in a frigid cave, Jennifer Stolpa listened through three days and nights for the rescuers she feared would never come. Instead, she heard the howls of coyotes, a terrifying sound that seemed to draw nearer by the hour. The food--fruitcake, coconut cookies and a few Doritos--had run out long before, and on Wednesday her breast milk was gone as well.
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NEWS
February 1, 1993 | From Associated Press
The California couple who spent eight days stranded in the snow will be going home today. James and Jennifer Stolpa, both 21, were set to be discharged from Washoe Medical Center, where they have been since their Jan. 6 rescue. They and their 5-month-old son, Clayton, were expected to fly to Hayward, Calif., by air ambulance. The couple suffered severe frostbite to their feet during the eight-day ordeal.
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NEWS
January 24, 1993 | Associated Press
A man who was stranded for eight days in the snowy Nevada desert underwent surgery Saturday to remove part of his severely frostbitten feet. The surgery on James Stolpa, 21, of Paso Robles, Calif., took about 8 1/2 hours at Washoe Medical Center. "He got out of surgery about 4 this afternoon and we hear that everything went very well," a hospital spokeswoman said. Stolpa's condition was not known.
NEWS
January 24, 1993 | Associated Press
A man who was stranded for eight days in the snowy Nevada desert underwent surgery Saturday to remove part of his severely frostbitten feet. The surgery on James Stolpa, 21, of Paso Robles, Calif., took about 8 1/2 hours at Washoe Medical Center. "He got out of surgery about 4 this afternoon and we hear that everything went very well," a hospital spokeswoman said. Stolpa's condition was not known.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1993 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kirk Reinschmidt, an equipment mechanic with the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, toils in more obscurity than most city employees could imagine. On a typical workday, he doesn't come anywhere near the department's Hope Street headquarters. Memos issued by the DWP brass are sent to him by mail. City Hall is just a building he visits maybe once a year to take civil service exams.
NEWS
January 9, 1993 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The prognosis for a couple stranded with their infant for more than a week in the snowy Nevada outback turned grimmer Friday as doctors predicted that James and Jennifer Stolpa would lose toes or portions of their feet to frostbite. Dr. Louis Bonaldi, a Reno microsurgeon and frostbite expert, said the Stolpas had each suffered "very severe" damage to the front one-third of both their feet during an odyssey that began when their pickup became mired in snowdrifts Dec. 29.
NEWS
February 1, 1993 | From Associated Press
The California couple who spent eight days stranded in the snow will be going home today. James and Jennifer Stolpa, both 21, were set to be discharged from Washoe Medical Center, where they have been since their Jan. 6 rescue. They and their 5-month-old son, Clayton, were expected to fly to Hayward, Calif., by air ambulance. The couple suffered severe frostbite to their feet during the eight-day ordeal.
NEWS
January 16, 1993 | Associated Press
Doctors announced Friday that they will partially amputate the feet of Jennifer Stolpa, who with her husband and infant son survived eight days in blizzard conditions in remote northwest Nevada. Dr. Louis Bonaldi, a reconstructive and plastic surgeon, said a surgical team will perform the partial amputation Monday, followed by immediate reconstructive surgery. "Normally in frostbite cases of this severity the entire foot would be removed," the hospital said in a written statement. "Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1993 | From Associated Press
Doctors on Friday announced that they will partially amputate the feet of Jennifer Stolpa, who with her husband and infant son survived eight days in blizzard conditions in remote northwest Nevada. The operation is scheduled for 7:30 a.m. Monday at Washoe Medical Center . Dr. Louis Bonaldi, a reconstructive and plastic surgeon who is Mrs. Stolpa's attending physician, said a surgical team will perform the partial amputation, followed by immediate reconstructive surgery.
NEWS
January 19, 1993 | Associated Press
A California woman who survived eight days stranded in snowy northwest Nevada with her husband and infant son underwent surgery Monday to remove part of her severely frostbitten feet. Denise Yoxsimer, a spokeswoman for Reno's Washoe Medical Center where the surgery took place, said that because of the complexity of the procedure, the results of the operation were not announced immediately. Jennifer Stolpa, 20, and her husband, James, 21, remain in satisfactory condition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1993 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kirk Reinschmidt, an equipment mechanic with the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, toils in more obscurity than most city employees could imagine. On a typical workday, he doesn't come anywhere near the department's Hope Street headquarters. Memos issued by the DWP brass are sent to him by mail. City Hall is just a building he visits maybe once a year to take civil service exams.
NEWS
January 9, 1993 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The prognosis for a couple stranded with their infant for more than a week in the snowy Nevada outback turned grimmer Friday as doctors predicted that James and Jennifer Stolpa would lose toes or portions of their feet to frostbite. Dr. Louis Bonaldi, a Reno microsurgeon and frostbite expert, said the Stolpas had each suffered "very severe" damage to the front one-third of both their feet during an odyssey that began when their pickup became mired in snowdrifts Dec. 29.
NEWS
January 8, 1993 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marooned with her baby in a frigid cave, Jennifer Stolpa listened through three days and nights for the rescuers she feared would never come. Instead, she heard the howls of coyotes, a terrifying sound that seemed to draw nearer by the hour. The food--fruitcake, coconut cookies and a few Doritos--had run out long before, and on Wednesday her breast milk was gone as well.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1993
Survival! It is our basic instinct when we approach the on-ramp to the freeway each morning. This instinct, multiplied a thousandfold, was evinced by James Daniel Stolpa, private first class, U.S. Army, when he saved himself, his wife, and his baby by hiking 40 miles through snow for two days in freezing weather (Jan. 7-8). The story is both astounding and thought-provoking. Suddenly we are reminded of the Donner party and their horrendous ordeal in an earlier era, and we realize that such feats of courage still exist.
NEWS
January 7, 1993 | JENIFER WARREN and DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A California couple and their infant son who were missing for a week were found alive Wednesday in a remote corner of northwest Nevada after being stranded in snow and freezing weather and seeking refuge in a cliffside cave. "All three of them appear to be in remarkably good condition," said Diane Robertson, a spokeswoman for the California Highway Patrol. Army Pfc.
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