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James T Grady

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NEWS
April 4, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
Fratricidal warfare in the Teamsters Union, precipitated by the Justice Department's anti-racketeering suit against the 1.6-million-member union, has intensified, despite the fact that the case was settled last month. On Monday, Teamster officials all over the country received a letter from Teamsters Secretary-Treasurer Weldon L. Mathis, the union's No. 2 official, attacking the settlement that Teamster President William J. McCarthy and 10 Teamster vice presidents approved March 13.
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NEWS
April 4, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
Fratricidal warfare in the Teamsters Union, precipitated by the Justice Department's anti-racketeering suit against the 1.6-million-member union, has intensified, despite the fact that the case was settled last month. On Monday, Teamster officials all over the country received a letter from Teamsters Secretary-Treasurer Weldon L. Mathis, the union's No. 2 official, attacking the settlement that Teamster President William J. McCarthy and 10 Teamster vice presidents approved March 13.
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NEWS
January 18, 1989 | RONALD J. OSTROW and CATHLEEN DECKER, Times Staff Writers
Although he has openly embraced officials of the corruption-plagued Teamsters Union in the past, President-elect Bush offered only the briefest of private greetings to the union's leadership Tuesday when they attended a closed-door meeting with his designated chief of staff, John H. Sununu, Bush aides said. Sheila Tate, a spokeswoman for Bush, said: "The Teamsters people were meeting with Sununu and the President-elect simply stopped by briefly.
NEWS
March 13, 1989 | From Associated Press
Prosecutors trying to seize the Teamsters union to rid it of alleged mob influence reached a tentative settlement with the union today that would allow its leaders to remain in office, a union lawyer said. The agreement was reached hours before the Justice Department's civil racketeering lawsuit against the nation's biggest union was to go to trial.
NEWS
October 14, 1989 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Justice Department offered Friday to create a $100,000 operating fund to help finance the work of three court-appointed officials who are supervising the affairs of the giant Teamsters Union. The offer was made by Randy M. Mastro, an assistant U.S. attorney, at a court hearing called to air charges that the union is refusing to pay legitimate fees and expenses of the court officials, despite its pledge to do so under terms of a court agreement. James T.
NEWS
February 2, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
Three Teamsters vice presidents, who resigned recently, have endorsed major union reforms in agreements with the government that dismiss them as defendants in a massive racketeering case filed against the union last year. The officials--Robert Holmes of Detroit, John H. Cleveland of Washington and Maurice R.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1991 | BOB BAKER, TIMES LABOR WRITER
Teamsters Union President William J. McCarthy and Joseph (Joe T) Trerotola, head of the union's Eastern Conference, have continued to associate with known members of organized crime in violation of a federal court agreement, according to a court-appointed investigator in charge of enforcing the agreement.
NEWS
February 1, 1991 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Teamster President William J. McCarthy on Thursday was accused of racketeering for allegedly awarding $3.8 million in union printing business to a firm owned by his son-in-law and for attempting to obstruct an official investigation of the matter. The charge was among several leveled in a scathing report to a federal judge by court-appointed union administrator Frederick B.
NEWS
December 6, 1990 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soon after Frederick B. Lacey took office last year as court-appointed administrator of the Teamsters, leaders of the union tried to freeze him out of their executive board meetings by holding secret, unannounced sessions. More at home in a courtroom than his adversaries, the former federal judge and one-time prosecutor of political corruption cases took the problem to U.S. District Judge David N.
NEWS
October 13, 1989 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders of the Teamsters Union are chafing under the supervision of three outside monitors appointed by a federal judge last spring to rid the nation's largest union of the influence of organized crime. Officers of the 1.6-million-member union had agreed to the appointments so that a civil racketeering lawsuit against the Teamsters could be settled without a trial. The legal action had been filed by the Justice Department last year.
NEWS
January 28, 1989 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
Teamsters Union President William J. McCarthy has summoned members of the union's executive board to a special meeting this weekend to vote on proposed settlement of the government's anti-racketeering lawsuit against the union, sources close to the case said Friday.
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