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BUSINESS
August 10, 1991
What Julie Cart neglected to mention in her article of July 31 ("Havana Did It With No Frills") is that all the construction for the Pan Am Games was finished in time with the use of slave labor. Perhaps not slave labor as Americans are used to hearing about, but a subtle type that degenerates the human spirit even more. This slave labor is brought about by the government, by the use of threats of job loss, jail and death.
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BUSINESS
March 19, 1991 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals court Monday threw out the criminal stock manipulation convictions of GAF Corp. and its former vice chairman, James T. Sherwin. Sherwin and GAF were convicted in December, 1989, of manipulating the price of Union Carbide stock on the New York Stock Exchange. Former Los Angeles-based stock trader Boyd L. Jefferies was the main government witness. The case was tried three times, with the first two trials ending in mistrials. In its ruling, the U.S.
BUSINESS
March 11, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
Jury deliberations are due to begin today in the GAF Corp. stock market manipulation trial, which has been under way in federal court in Manhattan for more than five weeks. U.S. District Judge Mary Johnson Lowe spent much of Friday instructing jurors on the legal issues in the case. They were then to be sent to a hotel for the night. The judge has ordered the jury sequestered, meaning that jurors won't be allowed to go home at night, to avoid any exposure to press coverage of the trial.
BUSINESS
January 5, 1989 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
Lawyers in the GAF Corp. stock manipulation trial disclosed Wednesday that the government has evidence that Jefferies Group Inc., a Los Angeles-based securities firm, may have made illegal campaign contributions to members of Congress. Arthur L. Liman, GAF's lead attorney, made the disclosure in U.S. District Court in Manhattan with jurors absent from the courtroom. Liman mentioned the possible violations during a discussion about the admissibility of evidence in the trial.
NEWS
March 19, 1989 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
A jury in the GAF Corp. stock market manipulation trial said Saturday that it was deadlocked 11 to 1 on eight pending criminal charges, raising the possibility that the widely followed Wall Street case may end for a second time in a mistrial. The jury agreed at the urging of U.S. District Judge Mary Johnson Lowe to try again today. The jurors gave no indication of which way the majority voted but said in a note: "We need help."
BUSINESS
December 13, 1988 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
Jury selection began Monday in the stock manipulation trial of GAF Corp. and its vice chairman, James T. Sherwin. The case is the first among the investigations spawned by the Ivan F. Boesky insider trading scandal to actually come to trial. It is also being billed as an important test of the evidence that prosecutors obtained from Boyd L. Jefferies, former chairman of the Los Angeles-based brokerage Jefferies & Co.
BUSINESS
December 22, 1988 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
Opening arguments in a criminal securities fraud trial against GAF Corp. and its vice chairman, James T. Sherwin, began Wednesday with a federal prosecutor spelling out what he called a "flat-out illegal" scheme to manipulate the price of Union Carbide stock in 1986. Assistant U.S. Atty. Carl H. Loewenson Jr. outlined for the jury a series of telephone calls between GAF officials and the Los Angeles-based securities broker Jefferies & Co.
BUSINESS
December 19, 1989 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an action that could provide clues about the future direction of communications regulation under President Bush, a listeners organization said Monday that it will challenge GAF Corp.'s ownership of a New York radio station because of the conviction last week of the company and its vice chairman on stock manipulation charges. The action could force GAF to sell classical music station WNCN-FM or change the structure under which it owns the station, David M.
BUSINESS
March 31, 1990 | From Reuters
A federal judge Friday fined GAF Corp. $2 million and sentenced the company's vice chairman to six months in prison for their role in a stock manipulation scheme. GAF Corp. and Vice Chairman James Sherwin were found guilty of trying to boost the price of Union Carbide Corp. stock in 1986 just before GAF was about to sell off a large block of Carbide shares. The stake was accumulated by GAF after a failed takeover attempt for the large chemical company. Wayne, N.J.
BUSINESS
December 19, 1989 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an action that could provide clues about the future direction of communications regulation under President Bush, a listeners organization said Monday that it will challenge GAF Corp.'s ownership of a New York radio station because of the conviction last week of the company and its vice chairman on stock manipulation charges. The action could force GAF to sell classical music station WNCN-FM or change the structure under which it owns the station, David M.
BUSINESS
December 14, 1989 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After two earlier trials ended without a verdict, the government succeeded Wednesday in a third attempt to convict GAF Corp. and its vice chairman on criminal stock market manipulation charges. A federal jury found the company and the executive, James T. Sherwin, 55, guilty on all eight felony counts pending against each. In the previous trial, the jury became deadlocked after 12 days of deliberations.
BUSINESS
December 9, 1989 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The stock market manipulation case against GAF Corp. and its vice chairman is about to go to a jury after a third trial, this time following the late introduction of dramatic new evidence for the defense. Two earlier trials ended in mistrials, the second in March after a federal jury deliberated 12 days before declaring that it was deadlocked. Jury deliberations in the third trial are due to start Monday.
BUSINESS
March 19, 1991 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals court Monday threw out the criminal stock manipulation convictions of GAF Corp. and its former vice chairman, James T. Sherwin. Sherwin and GAF were convicted in December, 1989, of manipulating the price of Union Carbide stock on the New York Stock Exchange. Former Los Angeles-based stock trader Boyd L. Jefferies was the main government witness. The case was tried three times, with the first two trials ending in mistrials. In its ruling, the U.S.
BUSINESS
March 23, 1989 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge declared a second mistrial in the GAF Corp. stock market manipulation case, this time after jurors exhausted from 12 days of deliberations threw in the towel and said they had no hope of reaching a verdict. Benito Romano, the acting U.S. attorney in Manhattan, immediately said his office would try the case a third time. U.S. District Judge Mary Johnson Lowe had declared a mistrial Jan.
BUSINESS
July 7, 1989 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
1986 Nov. 14: Stock speculator Ivan F. Boesky agrees to pay $100 million to settle charges of trading on insider information. He also agrees to cooperate with investigators and to plead guilty to a single, unspecified criminal charge. 1987 March 19: Boyd L. Jefferies, founder of the Los Angeles securities firm Jefferies & Co., agrees to plead guilty to two criminal charges involving securities law violations, including one deal involving Boesky. He is not accused of insider trading.
BUSINESS
March 23, 1989 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge declared a second mistrial in the GAF Corp. stock market manipulation case, this time after jurors exhausted from 12 days of deliberations threw in the towel and said they had no hope of reaching a verdict. Benito Romano, the acting U.S. attorney in Manhattan, immediately said his office would try the case a third time. U.S. District Judge Mary Johnson Lowe had declared a mistrial Jan.
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