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James Thurber

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December 29, 1996 | BILL BARICH
Harrison Kinney wrote a college thesis on Thurber, tracked down his hero at the New Yorker, landed a job there as a reporter and spent more than 40 years compiling the material that forms the substance of his exhaustive but ultimately winning book. James Thurber comes across as a gifted, troubled and often disagreeable man. Thurber suffered a childhood mishap that marked him for life when an older brother accidentally blinded him in one eye.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Novelist and screenwriter Pamela Ribon's memoir, "Notes to Boys (and Other Things I Shouldn't Share in Public)" publishes Tuesday. As her book trailer (a cut above your average book trailer) explains, Ribon has gone back to her early writings to tell stories that are amusing and embarrassing. Ribon has always been funny and frank on her blog Pamie.com ; in her new book she goes further, revealing what she wrote to teenage crushes. Be ready for awkward. And some bad teen poetry.
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BOOKS
August 10, 2003 | Christopher Buckley, Christopher Buckley is the author, most recently, of "No Way to Treat a First Lady."
"It is 104 here today," James Thurber wrote to a friend from Hollywood in 1939, "but the papers in this godawful hellhole proclaim 'Angelenos Suffer no Discomfort.' That would be too bad. I hope the sons of bitches burn up." What could be more refreshing than a Great East Coast Literary Figure draining his spleen beneath the remunerative palms? There are a number of delicious L.A. moments in this door-stopper collection of Thurber's letters.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
NEW YORK - When screenwriter Steven Conrad was hired to write a draft of "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty" three years ago, he knew the degree of difficulty would be high. After all, over a development period of more than 15 years, about a half-dozen writers had unsuccessfully given it a shot, some with logical pedigrees (Peter Tolan, "Analyze This"), some less likely (Richard LaGravanese, "The Fisher King"). "I didn't think of it as Kurtz - six writers had tried and never been heard from again," said Conrad, tossing in an ominous "Apocalypse Now" reference.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
NEW YORK - When screenwriter Steven Conrad was hired to write a draft of "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty" three years ago, he knew the degree of difficulty would be high. After all, over a development period of more than 15 years, about a half-dozen writers had unsuccessfully given it a shot, some with logical pedigrees (Peter Tolan, "Analyze This"), some less likely (Richard LaGravanese, "The Fisher King"). "I didn't think of it as Kurtz - six writers had tried and never been heard from again," said Conrad, tossing in an ominous "Apocalypse Now" reference.
NEWS
December 12, 1994 | ELAINE KENDALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Timed to coincide with the 100th anniversary of James Thurber's birth, "Remember Laughter," a succinct biography, is a gift package of mixed messages. Drawing heavily on the memories of friends, New Yorker colleagues and particularly Thurber's daughter Rosemary, the book balances an admiring assessment of the delightful wit, the unforgettable drawings and the enduring classics against disturbing recollections of Thurber's mercurial personality.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2012 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
In the role that won him an Emmy Award for best actor in a comedy series, William Windom played John Monroe, a writer-cartoonist for a New York magazine who harnessed an active fantasy life to escape the doldrums of his middle-class Connecticut existence. Based on the work of American humorist James Thurber, "My World and Welcome to It" survived only one season on NBC. But for Windom, the program marked the start of a long-term relationship with Thurber's whimsical Americana. The actor subsequently developed a one-man show based on Thurber's writings that he toured across the United States.
BOOKS
February 9, 1986
"Parting Word": James Thurber, 1872-1970 (Book Review, Jan. 19.). The Jim Thurber I used to know summers during the mid-late '30s at Martha's Vineyard was no 60-plus fellow. I thought at that time, say, 40-ish. Perhaps not the "Parting Word," but the "Last Word(s)" should be "James Thurber, 1894-1961." As they used to say about the midget that Bill Veeck sent in as a pinch hitter, "you could look it up." GEORGE SLAFF Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The finalists for the 2013 Thurber Prize for American Humor include Shalom Auslander for his darkly funny novel "Hope, A Tragedy. " But all is not grim: The other finalists are Dave Barry and Alan Zweibel for "Lunatics," a madcap story of soccer dads, and Dan Zevin for his comic memoir of fatherhood, "Dan Gets a Minivan. " The Thurber Prize awards $5,000 annually to an excellent work of American humor writing; winners also get a crystal plaque. Works of fiction and nonfiction are eligible.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
James Thurber's story "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty" is very short: 15 paragraphs, barely 2,000 words. You can read it (or reread it) in less than 10 minutes: a small and sad-eyed daydream , much like the action it describes. And yet, since it first appeared in the March 18, 1939, issue of the New Yorker, Thurber's small-bore masterpiece has inspired two full-length films: the 1947 version with Danny Kaye and a new adaptation , due in December, starring and directed by Ben Stiller.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2012 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
In the role that won him an Emmy Award for best actor in a comedy series, William Windom played John Monroe, a writer-cartoonist for a New York magazine who harnessed an active fantasy life to escape the doldrums of his middle-class Connecticut existence. Based on the work of American humorist James Thurber, "My World and Welcome to It" survived only one season on NBC. But for Windom, the program marked the start of a long-term relationship with Thurber's whimsical Americana. The actor subsequently developed a one-man show based on Thurber's writings that he toured across the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2012 | Times staff and wire reports
David Rakoff, a humorist whose cynical outlook on life and culture earned him the 2011 Thurber Prize for American Humor, died Thursday in New York City after a long illness. He was 47. The statement from Doubleday and Anchor Books announcing his death did not give a cause, but Rakoff had long written about his battles with cancer. He won the Thurber prize - named for legendary humorist James Thurber - for "Half Empty" (2010), his third collection of essays. They veered from sarcastic to poignant and expounded on such topics as optimism, mortality and the bohemian myth of artists.
BOOKS
August 10, 2003 | Christopher Buckley, Christopher Buckley is the author, most recently, of "No Way to Treat a First Lady."
"It is 104 here today," James Thurber wrote to a friend from Hollywood in 1939, "but the papers in this godawful hellhole proclaim 'Angelenos Suffer no Discomfort.' That would be too bad. I hope the sons of bitches burn up." What could be more refreshing than a Great East Coast Literary Figure draining his spleen beneath the remunerative palms? There are a number of delicious L.A. moments in this door-stopper collection of Thurber's letters.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2001 | JANA J. MONJI
"A Thurber Carnival" made its Broadway debut in 1960. This revival at the El Portal Center for the Arts' Circle Theatre tries too hard, and some of the gentle chuckles are lost in the slightly off-kilter timing and the overly earnest affectations. James Thurber was a humorist who wrote for the New Yorker. His short story "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty" was made into a Danny Kaye movie. Jack Lemmon portrayed a Thurber-like character in "The War Between Men and Women."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1986 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN
"The Unicorn in the Garden and Other Fables for Our Time" by James Thurber. Read by Peter Ustinov. Caedmon. This enchanting blend of Thurber, master humorist, and Ustinov, masterful raconteur, should make anybody's Top 10 list of the best cassettes so far. Ustinov tells Thurber's updated fables (the hare crosses the finish line before the tortoise has gone nine feet) in a dazzling array of accents.
BOOKS
December 29, 1996 | BILL BARICH
Harrison Kinney wrote a college thesis on Thurber, tracked down his hero at the New Yorker, landed a job there as a reporter and spent more than 40 years compiling the material that forms the substance of his exhaustive but ultimately winning book. James Thurber comes across as a gifted, troubled and often disagreeable man. Thurber suffered a childhood mishap that marked him for life when an older brother accidentally blinded him in one eye.
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