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James Toback

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
CANNES, France - At last year's Cannes Film Festival, Alec Baldwin and director James Toback were pitching their idea for an Iraq-set love story to financier and sales agent Avi Lerner. Lerner waved them aside, saying he could make the duo's movie at a realistic budget only if it starred more bankable actors than Baldwin - say, Gerard Butler and, as Lerner put it, "what's her name, Natalie Portman. " "I love that he said, 'What's her name,'" Toback, the outspoken director of well-regarded indies such as "Fingers" and "Tyson," recalled during a dinner interview with Baldwin last week.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
CANNES, France - At last year's Cannes Film Festival, Alec Baldwin and director James Toback were pitching their idea for an Iraq-set love story to financier and sales agent Avi Lerner. Lerner waved them aside, saying he could make the duo's movie at a realistic budget only if it starred more bankable actors than Baldwin - say, Gerard Butler and, as Lerner put it, "what's her name, Natalie Portman. " "I love that he said, 'What's her name,'" Toback, the outspoken director of well-regarded indies such as "Fingers" and "Tyson," recalled during a dinner interview with Baldwin last week.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2000 | JOHN ANDERSON, FOR THE TIMES
Having written "Bugsy" (1991) and "The Gambler" (1975) and having directed what some feel was among the great debuts in American film--"Fingers" (1977)--James Toback carries around a credibility that's belied by almost every movie he's subsequently made (most recently 1998's "Two Girls and a Guy").
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
HBO has picked up the North American TV rights to James Toback's Cannes-themed feature documentary "Seduced and Abandoned," which, fittingly, will have its world premiere next Monday, May 20, as a special screening at the Cannes Film Festival. Shot during last year's fest on the French Riviera, the film follows Toback and Alec Baldwin as they shuttle between yachts and hotels, pitching a movie they hope to finance and make. And while the cameras were rolling, they decided to explore the festival itself and the changing nature of the film business,  interviewing the likes of Bernardo Bertolucci, Francis Ford Coppola, Roman Polanski and Martin Scorsese, as well as several actors, including Ryan Gosling, Jessica Chastain and James Caan.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
HBO has picked up the North American TV rights to James Toback's Cannes-themed feature documentary "Seduced and Abandoned," which, fittingly, will have its world premiere next Monday, May 20, as a special screening at the Cannes Film Festival. Shot during last year's fest on the French Riviera, the film follows Toback and Alec Baldwin as they shuttle between yachts and hotels, pitching a movie they hope to finance and make. And while the cameras were rolling, they decided to explore the festival itself and the changing nature of the film business,  interviewing the likes of Bernardo Bertolucci, Francis Ford Coppola, Roman Polanski and Martin Scorsese, as well as several actors, including Ryan Gosling, Jessica Chastain and James Caan.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1986 | DENNIS HUNT, Times Staff Writer
Another controversial cult film, writer-director James Toback's "Fingers," is being released Tuesday by Media at $49.95. This is one of these sordid melodramas that fans either love or loathe. Despite limited distribution--60 theaters in 10 cities--when it was released in 1978, it has attained the status of cult classic. "Fingers" debuted on videocassette the same year it was released, but that was before the videocassette boom. It quickly went out of print.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2002 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Toback's "Harvard Man" is a fast and clever con-gone-wrong comedy that reflects the writer-director's characteristic blend of the intellectual and the criminal. But it lacks anyone to care about--even the repellent characters are less than fascinating--and the result is a crisply made movie that is no more than mildly amusing. Adrian Grenier's Alan is a Harvard philosophy major and a point guard on the basketball team.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1997 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sex is writer-director James Toback's favorite subject. Death and his alma mater, Harvard, are also abiding interests, but neither holds a candle to copulation. Toback's 1987 film, "The Pick-up Artist," featured Robert Downey Jr. as a relentless lech who pursued women like a heat-seeking missile. His 1989 documentary, "The Big Bang," was built on the idea that the creation of the cosmos was the orgasmic explosion of God.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2008 | Kenneth Turan
Cannes 2008 is turning into a bad-boys convention. First was the collaboration between Mike Tyson and James Toback, and now, "Maradona by Kusturica," a fan's-notes film about the great Argentine soccer star Diego Maradona by the two-time Palme d'Or-winning Serbian director Emir Kusturica. The film includes vintage clips of some of Maradona's astonishing goals, which lead the director to call him "the Sex Pistol of international football." This film also offers a glimpse into the intensity of the admiration Maradona inspires.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2002 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Toback's "Harvard Man" is a fast and clever con-gone-wrong comedy that reflects the writer-director's characteristic blend of the intellectual and the criminal. But it lacks anyone to care about--even the repellent characters are less than fascinating--and the result is a crisply made movie that is no more than mildly amusing. Adrian Grenier's Alan is a Harvard philosophy major and a point guard on the basketball team.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2000 | JOHN ANDERSON, FOR THE TIMES
Having written "Bugsy" (1991) and "The Gambler" (1975) and having directed what some feel was among the great debuts in American film--"Fingers" (1977)--James Toback carries around a credibility that's belied by almost every movie he's subsequently made (most recently 1998's "Two Girls and a Guy").
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1997 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sex is writer-director James Toback's favorite subject. Death and his alma mater, Harvard, are also abiding interests, but neither holds a candle to copulation. Toback's 1987 film, "The Pick-up Artist," featured Robert Downey Jr. as a relentless lech who pursued women like a heat-seeking missile. His 1989 documentary, "The Big Bang," was built on the idea that the creation of the cosmos was the orgasmic explosion of God.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1986 | DENNIS HUNT, Times Staff Writer
Another controversial cult film, writer-director James Toback's "Fingers," is being released Tuesday by Media at $49.95. This is one of these sordid melodramas that fans either love or loathe. Despite limited distribution--60 theaters in 10 cities--when it was released in 1978, it has attained the status of cult classic. "Fingers" debuted on videocassette the same year it was released, but that was before the videocassette boom. It quickly went out of print.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2009 | Associated Press
Producer-director Brett Ratner is adding publisher to his list of credits. The Hollywood hyphenate intends to release three books today through his publishing company, Rat Press. The softcover books -- on Marlon Brando, Robert Evans and Jim Brown -- are the first in a series of planned releases of out-of-print books about filmmakers and filmmaking.
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