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James Truman

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NEWS
May 10, 1994 | GERALDINE BAUM, Los Angeles Times
The elevator floats upward, carrying the young dauphin of Conde Nast to the 14th floor. A too-tanned woman cosseted in Chanel enters on a lower floor and upon engaging those silent blue eyes gushes an invitation to lunch. Soon? she swoons. Soon, he replies graciously, continuing his ascent. A modification of Ross Perot's great sucking sound seems to follow James Truman everywhere these days.
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NEWS
July 22, 1994 | PAUL D. COLFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES: Paul D. Colford is a columnist for Newsday
As Spy magazine rises from the grave with a summer issue that reprises some of its greatest hits about Hollywood, the New York Times and other media institutions, it also features a new mediacentric department, "Magazine Heaven," to chronicle the fab, clubby and ruthless ways of New York's mag industry. Spy starts with four pages about Conde Nast. And is it any wonder? Conde Nast Publications Inc.
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NEWS
January 27, 1992 | GARRY ABRAMS
Sex may be giving Details magazine editor in chief James Truman a headache. At least, Truman is downplaying the significance of a photo showing a man getting ready to go out on a date--with another man--that will appear in the March issue. Actually, Truman is a bit miffed that New York magazine recently jumped on the forthcoming photo as evidence that Details "appears to be wooing a gay readership."
NEWS
May 10, 1994 | GERALDINE BAUM, Los Angeles Times
The elevator floats upward, carrying the young dauphin of Conde Nast to the 14th floor. A too-tanned woman cosseted in Chanel enters on a lower floor and upon engaging those silent blue eyes gushes an invitation to lunch. Soon? she swoons. Soon, he replies graciously, continuing his ascent. A modification of Ross Perot's great sucking sound seems to follow James Truman everywhere these days.
NEWS
July 22, 1994 | PAUL D. COLFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES: Paul D. Colford is a columnist for Newsday
As Spy magazine rises from the grave with a summer issue that reprises some of its greatest hits about Hollywood, the New York Times and other media institutions, it also features a new mediacentric department, "Magazine Heaven," to chronicle the fab, clubby and ruthless ways of New York's mag industry. Spy starts with four pages about Conde Nast. And is it any wonder? Conde Nast Publications Inc.
NEWS
February 3, 1999 | PAUL D. COLFORD
If you can't beat 'em, hire 'em. Details, a fashion and entertainment magazine for young men that's been hovering below 500,000 in circulation, has hired as its new editor in chief the editor of an increasingly more popular rival.
NEWS
July 27, 2001 | GLORIA DIAZ and MARJORIE HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Proving to be a chameleon to the core, the Material Girl once again pushes fashion boundaries with her latest North American "Drowned World" tour. From geisha girl kimonos to urban cowgirl chaps, concert-goers are being treated to a virtual trip around the world. During the themed two-hour show, Madonna explores her husband Guy Ritchie's Scottish roots, wearing a kilt-like creation. Audiences are fooled by the custom-made black-and-white tartan "bum flaps" designed by Phillip and Schmidt.
NEWS
September 23, 1993 | BOB SIPCHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Confirming rumors that had circulated for about two weeks, the Hearst Corporation on Tuesday replaced Terry McDonell, the gruff, straight-shooting editor of Esquire magazine with Edward Kosner, editor and president of New York magazine. Hearst press releases did not explain the reasons for the shake-up, and neither D. Claeys Bahrenburg, president of Hearst Magazines, nor Alan Stiles, Esquire's publisher, would comment.
NEWS
March 30, 1995 | HILLARY JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What better way to spend the pre-Oscar Sunday than at a pool party at the Chateau Marmont to celebrate the opening of the Ford Models Inc. Los Angeles office? No one swam, save for a brave 6-year-old, who, of course, had no cellulite. The models wore satin dresses and strappy sandals, and smoked cigarettes. Caving to that old New York-L.A. fashion phobia, Angelenos didn't turn up in native costume: There was only one baseball cap in evidence. It didn't seem fair.
NEWS
January 27, 1992 | GARRY ABRAMS
Sex may be giving Details magazine editor in chief James Truman a headache. At least, Truman is downplaying the significance of a photo showing a man getting ready to go out on a date--with another man--that will appear in the March issue. Actually, Truman is a bit miffed that New York magazine recently jumped on the forthcoming photo as evidence that Details "appears to be wooing a gay readership."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1999 | PATRICK GRAHAM, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Art Freeman knows his years are numbered as a citrus grower. Freeman owns and tends a 300-acre spread of lush green groves some 20 miles east of downtown Phoenix, far removed from the urban sprawl. But that may not be the case much longer. The development that has swallowed up so much of the surrounding desert is steadily advancing on the farm he established 30 years ago. "Farming is done here, but we have no place to go," he lamented. "We don't fit in anymore."
NEWS
December 9, 1994 | PAUL D. COLFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; He is a columnist for Newsday
This was a year when many more players in the wide world of print came to share the vision of a so-called information superhighway, which someday may carry text and video traffic from home to home. More magazines and newspapers staked a place in this wired future by offering on-line extensions of their news-gathering operations. HarperCollins and other publishers launched interactive divisions to develop CD-ROMs and book spinoffs that need no stitched binding.
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