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James Van Praagh

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MAGAZINE
January 24, 1999 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, Paul Lieberman, a Times staff writer, last wrote on Doris Duke and her butler for the magazine. Times researcher Tere Petersen also contributed to this article
James Van Praagh promises us one hell of a heaven. It's a place with forests and flowers and lakes and boats, and beautiful mansions, too. It's a place where the aged return to their prime and where the young, struck down too soon, can grow into theirs. It's a place where amputees find their limbs restored and those blown to bits in a plane crash become whole again. OK, heavy smokers may still be battling their addiction and the mentally ill may need some counseling.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2004 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
"The Dead Will Tell" (premiering Sunday night on CBS) is an effective creep show involving the familiar story of an amateur sleuth (Anne Heche this time) impelled by supernatural clues to solve an old murder.
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MAGAZINE
February 14, 1999
As a mental-health professional for Los Angeles County and one who has met with James Van Praagh and Brian Hurst, I am intrigued by the fact that Paul Lieberman focuses on the same polemics as the usual critics of mediumship ("Medium of the Moment," Jan. 24). Has it occurred to anyone that these gentlemen may in fact be communicating with a real spirit world? And if that is the case, why on earth aren't Van Praagh and Hurst afforded greater respect, even though they dare to make a living helping the bereaved?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2002 | BRIAN LOWRY
Michael Shermer, publisher of Skeptic magazine and director of the Skeptics Society, has an idea for a TV show that would debunk psychics, faith healers and other mysterious phenomena that he deems a fraud or simply explainable in less-than-supernatural terms. So far, no one has bitten. And surveying the TV landscape, it's not hard to understand why--the strange and unexplained having been very, very good to television, providing scant incentive to suggest otherwise.
MAGAZINE
June 13, 1999
SURFING: get doughnuts v. Wipe out. "Brock got major doughnuts on that last set wave." nug n. Short for nugget. A beautiful girl. "Sean's girlfriend is a nug." SKATEBOARDING: ghetto adj. Second-rate or crappy. "That ramp they put up for yesterday's vert contest was ghetto." sick adj. Amazing. "Did you see Steve's 360 flip? That was sick!" SPIRITUALIZING: woo-woo adj. Spiritually unstable. "The publicist for JAMES VAN PRAAGH (right) says he's a down-to-earth medium, not the woo-woo type."
HEALTH
March 29, 1999
HARDCOVER and PAPERBACK 1. "Dr. Atkins' New Diet Revolution," by Robert C. Atkins (Avon, $6.50 paper) 2. "Protein Power," by Michael R. Eades and Mary D. Eades (Bantam, $6.50 paper) 3. "Zagat Survey 1999: Los Angeles / Southern California Restaurant Guide," edited by Merrill Shindler and Karen Berk (ZagatSurvey, $10.95 paper) 4. "How to Get What You Want and Want What You Have: A Practical and Spiritual Guide to Personal Success," by John Gray (HarperCollins, $24.95) 5.
MAGAZINE
June 29, 1997
I was struck by the curious juxtaposition of articles in the May 18 magazine. In Paul Lieberman's story ("The Butler, the Heiress, the Maid and the Medium"), one reads of the $600 seance held by medium James Van Praagh in which the spirit of Doris Duke's butler and heir, Bernard Lafferty, was contacted. Next, one reads Miles Corwin's article on the young men gunned down in South-Central whose murders go unsolved ("For the Longest Time I Just Wanted to Die"). Perhaps Van Praagh could be called upon to solve the South-Central murders--or could it be that the spirits he contacts inhabit an afterlife where only the white, wealthy and famous reside?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2004 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
"The Dead Will Tell" (premiering Sunday night on CBS) is an effective creep show involving the familiar story of an amateur sleuth (Anne Heche this time) impelled by supernatural clues to solve an old murder.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1994 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Talking to the Dead II. . . . The response was heavy concerning my recent face-to-face chat with James Van Praagh, the mesmerizing spiritualist medium who claimed to communicate with my dead stepfather, just as he regularly had made contact on television with others who have "passed over."
NEWS
April 21, 1998 | ROY RIVENBURG, Times Staff Writer
Proof the Cold War Is Over: A 7-foot-tall pickle is touring American military bases as part of a weird publicity stunt by the Heinz pickle company. The colossal cucumber, dubbed Pvt. Pickle, is scheduled to march through 100 domestic and overseas bases during the next three months, handing out pickle coupons and pickle pins in his role as the nation's "first mascot for military families." According to Heinz, the Godzilla-sized gherkin is a dill.
NEWS
April 28, 2002 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To hear the participants describe it, CBS' four-hour movie "Living With the Dead" was literally a spirited production. "There was definitely some intervention from the other side on this miniseries," said executive producer Stanley M. Brooks. "Living With the Dead," which will be shown on Sunday and Tuesday, is based on the life of James Van Praagh, who purports to talk with people who have died.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2002 | Howard Rosenberg
Dead people talking ... and walking. Bad is one thing, but this week television gets really putrid. It starts tonight on ABC when George Anderson's chitchat with the dead includes Robert Blake's slain wife, Bonny Lee Bakley, and continues Sunday when Ted Danson--as James Van Praagh--talks and even runs away from the dead on CBS. You just have to be there when spooks pop from the ground at night and chase him through a forest. Anderson's special is "Contact: Talking to the Dead," the Van Praagh miniseries "Living With the Dead."
MAGAZINE
June 13, 1999
SURFING: get doughnuts v. Wipe out. "Brock got major doughnuts on that last set wave." nug n. Short for nugget. A beautiful girl. "Sean's girlfriend is a nug." SKATEBOARDING: ghetto adj. Second-rate or crappy. "That ramp they put up for yesterday's vert contest was ghetto." sick adj. Amazing. "Did you see Steve's 360 flip? That was sick!" SPIRITUALIZING: woo-woo adj. Spiritually unstable. "The publicist for JAMES VAN PRAAGH (right) says he's a down-to-earth medium, not the woo-woo type."
HEALTH
March 29, 1999
HARDCOVER and PAPERBACK 1. "Dr. Atkins' New Diet Revolution," by Robert C. Atkins (Avon, $6.50 paper) 2. "Protein Power," by Michael R. Eades and Mary D. Eades (Bantam, $6.50 paper) 3. "Zagat Survey 1999: Los Angeles / Southern California Restaurant Guide," edited by Merrill Shindler and Karen Berk (ZagatSurvey, $10.95 paper) 4. "How to Get What You Want and Want What You Have: A Practical and Spiritual Guide to Personal Success," by John Gray (HarperCollins, $24.95) 5.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1999 | AL MARTINEZ
It was the night of a full moon and a representative at Brentano's bookstore had just said to a crowd of about 200 people, "We're all going to die," when the spiritualist James Van Praagh appeared. I would like to tell you he floated down from the ceiling, his dark cape flowing and his eyes a window on hell, but that would be wrong. Instead, he bounced into the room like a balloon, said "Hi!" as though he were a Mouseketeer, stood on a stool and began to talk.
MAGAZINE
February 14, 1999
As a mental-health professional for Los Angeles County and one who has met with James Van Praagh and Brian Hurst, I am intrigued by the fact that Paul Lieberman focuses on the same polemics as the usual critics of mediumship ("Medium of the Moment," Jan. 24). Has it occurred to anyone that these gentlemen may in fact be communicating with a real spirit world? And if that is the case, why on earth aren't Van Praagh and Hurst afforded greater respect, even though they dare to make a living helping the bereaved?
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