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James W Iii Hall

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NEWS
February 28, 1989
An Army warrant officer accused of spying for the Warsaw Pact has waived his right to an Article 32 hearing, a grand jury-type proceeding, and will face an immediate court-martial starting next week, the service said. The case has been referred to trial as a "non-capital case," meaning if convicted the maximum punishment would be life in prison, the Army added. Warrant Officer James W. Hall III, 30, of New York City, was arrested Dec. 21 near Savannah, Ga.
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NEWS
July 20, 1989
A federal jury went behind closed doors in Savannah, Ga., to weigh the fate of Huseyin Yildirim, a 61-year-old Turk accused of plotting with an Army officer to sell U.S. military secrets to the Soviet bloc. The case went to the jury after defense attorney Lamar Walter wrapped up his case without calling a single witness for Yildirim, accused of acting as a courier between Army Warrant Officer James W. Hall II and agents for East Germany, beginning in 1982.
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NEWS
December 23, 1988 | Associated Press
The Army on Thursday moved from Georgia to Maryland a soldier suspected of spying for the Warsaw Pact. Pentagon officials meanwhile expressed some optimism that the security breach might not be as severe as originally feared. Lt. Col. John Chapla, an Army spokesman, said Warrant Officer James W. Hall III was transferred under guard from Ft. Stewart, Ga., where he was assigned, to Ft. Meade, Md., outside Washington.
NEWS
January 5, 1989 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
Providing new details of the alleged spying of Warrant Officer James W. Hall III, the Army Wednesday accused him of providing East German agents with film and documents on military satellites, communications intelligence and the capability of the United States to retaliate against a large-scale attack. The charges brought against Hall, 30, include conspiracy, security violations and espionage--charges that could result in the death penalty under military law.
NEWS
January 5, 1989 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
Providing new details of the alleged spying of Warrant Officer James W. Hall III, the Army Wednesday accused him of providing East German agents with film and documents on military satellites, communications intelligence and the capability of the United States to retaliate against a large-scale attack. The charges brought against Hall, 30, include conspiracy, security violations and espionage--charges that could result in the death penalty under military law.
NEWS
December 22, 1988 | RONALD J. OSTROW and ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writers
Moving to shut off what one official called "a massive hemorrhage" of U.S. defense secrets to East Germany and the Soviet Union, federal agents Wednesday arrested an Army specialist in electronic eavesdropping equipment and a Turkish citizen accused of serving as his courier in a six-year espionage operation. Warrant Officer James W. Hall III, 30, whose "high-living style" first alerted U.S. authorities, was arrested by Army intelligence agents at Ft. Stewart, Ga.
NEWS
December 23, 1988 | Associated Press
The Army on Thursday moved from Georgia to Maryland a soldier suspected of spying for the Warsaw Pact. Pentagon officials meanwhile expressed some optimism that the security breach might not be as severe as originally feared. Lt. Col. John Chapla, an Army spokesman, said Warrant Officer James W. Hall III was transferred under guard from Ft. Stewart, Ga., where he was assigned, to Ft. Meade, Md., outside Washington.
NEWS
December 22, 1988 | RONALD J. OSTROW and ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writers
Moving to shut off what one official called "a massive hemorrhage" of U.S. defense secrets to East Germany and the Soviet Union, federal agents Wednesday arrested an Army specialist in electronic eavesdropping equipment and a Turkish citizen accused of serving as his courier in a six-year espionage operation. Warrant Officer James W. Hall III, 30, whose "high-living style" first alerted U.S. authorities, was arrested by Army intelligence agents at Ft. Stewart, Ga.
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